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Re: Brass engines

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  • M├írio
    ... I m with you, Doug. Let s give a big hand on Duncan. THANK YOU Duncan for your offer. Sooner or later I will certainly need your advice.This is a VERY nice
    Message 1 of 17 , Dec 3, 2001
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      --- In HOn3@y..., "Doug Coffey" <dougcoffey1950@y...> wrote:

      I'm with you, Doug.

      Let's give a big hand on Duncan.

      THANK YOU Duncan for your offer. Sooner or later I will certainly
      need your advice.This is a VERY nice offer and can make us save our
      precious bucks, and, in the end, we all be one more satisfied
      customer.

      Mario

      >
      > > Isn't that a very nice offer ?
      > >
      > > Mario
      >
      > I thought so . I had been looking at a locomotive from Caboose
      Hobbies
      > for awhile now and decided I probably wouldn't buy anymore brass
      > without running it first.
      > I took Duncan to task and emailed him to look into it for me.
      > I recieved a prompt email back outlining his time schedule and
      > informing me whe he would be back at work and able to test run it
      for
      > me. He plans to give me a full report.
      > I was impressed and probably will buy that locomotive after all if
      > he gives me a good report.
      > Some call it spam. Some call it service.
      > I am one that appreciates the vendors of model railroad products
      > getting personally involved in the internet groups. I'm glad they
      are
      > here and I am glad to be free to make my own choices.
      > Doug
    • drgwbob
      ... Hobbies ... for ... are ... I have purchased many locos over the years from Caboose Hobbies, and I feel comfortable saying that they have probably the most
      Message 2 of 17 , Dec 15, 2001
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        --- In HOn3@y..., "Doug Coffey" <dougcoffey1950@y...> wrote:
        >
        > > Isn't that a very nice offer ?
        > >
        > > Mario
        >
        > I thought so . I had been looking at a locomotive from Caboose
        Hobbies
        > for awhile now and decided I probably wouldn't buy anymore brass
        > without running it first.
        > I took Duncan to task and emailed him to look into it for me.
        > I recieved a prompt email back outlining his time schedule and
        > informing me whe he would be back at work and able to test run it
        for
        > me. He plans to give me a full report.
        > I was impressed and probably will buy that locomotive after all if
        > he gives me a good report.
        > Some call it spam. Some call it service.
        > I am one that appreciates the vendors of model railroad products
        > getting personally involved in the internet groups. I'm glad they
        are
        > here and I am glad to be free to make my own choices.
        > Doug

        I have purchased many locos over the years from Caboose Hobbies, and
        I feel comfortable saying that they have probably the most
        knowledgeable staff in the world with regard to brass, especially
        with regard to western steam, and especially with regard to HOn3.
        When I buy an engine, I ask the person to pull both the engine and
        the box, and ask if they can run the engine for me. They can usually
        give me a good assessment of running characteristics and quality of
        paint.

        In addition, they have what I would consider to be the most uniform
        coding system of any dealer with regard to how brass is listed. If
        you go to their on-line brass list, you will find that the codes in
        the description will tell you such things as quality of foam, quality
        of the box, wheel wear, tarnish, etc. These are all important
        considerations.

        Finally, their on-line brass list also provides photos of the items
        in many cases, and that's of great help.

        Most important of all is their no questions asked return policy,
        which always gives you a way out if you don't like the engine. Bob
        Schaefer.
      • dougcoffey1950
        Bob, What exactly does the term worn wheels mean when applied to brass. I have often seen this term and shied away because I thought perhaps the plating was
        Message 3 of 17 , Dec 16, 2001
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          Bob,
          What exactly does the term "worn wheels" mean when applied to brass. I
          have often seen this term and shied away because I thought perhaps the
          plating was off the tires and worn down to the brass.
          Since I operate the locomotives this would be a bad thing. If it
          simply means the wheels show signs of wear from being operated on a
          layout then it would not matter to me.
          Please explain.
          Doug
        • Duncan Harvey
          Doug, I may be able to help a little here. The worn wheels note usually means that there is enough wear that it is noticeable. It can just be wear on the
          Message 4 of 17 , Dec 16, 2001
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            Doug,
            I may be able to help a little here. The "worn wheels"
            note usually means that there is enough wear that it is
            noticeable. It can just be wear on the nickel silver tires,
            all the way to, worn through the plating on the tires
            exposing the base metal beneath. Some don't mind the wear,
            as they say it shows the engine runs well enough to have
            been operated a lot. Others say when it is bad enough to
            warrant the label then it may begin to interfere with the
            running. There are services that offer to replate wheels.
            I don't know much about them - how good it is, how
            expensive, how time consuming. I have just heard about
            them. Hope this helps you find the ideal loco. Take care.
            Duncan

            dougcoffey1950 wrote:

            > Bob,
            > What exactly does the term "worn wheels" mean when applied
            > to brass. I
            > have often seen this term and shied away because I thought
            > perhaps the
            > plating was off the tires and worn down to the brass.
            > Since I operate the locomotives this would be a bad thing.
            > If it
            > simply means the wheels show signs of wear from being
            > operated on a
            > layout then it would not matter to me.
            > Please explain.
            > Doug
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
            ADVERTISEMENT


            >
            > HOn3 list web pages are:
            > http://www.railway-eng.com/hon3/
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/archive/Hon3/
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/files/HOn3/
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms
            > of Service.


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Anne Ogborn
            Often a local jeweler can replate wheels. -- Anne Ogborn Need motors? HOn30? Try Annie s Depot - http://www.idiom.com/~anniepoo/depot/index.html
            Message 5 of 17 , Dec 16, 2001
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              Often a local jeweler can replate wheels.


              --
              Anne Ogborn

              Need motors? HOn30? Try Annie's Depot -
              http://www.idiom.com/~anniepoo/depot/index.html
            • drgwbob
              ... brass. I ... the ... When I see the term worn wheels in a listing, I generally assume that the wear is significant, perhaps to the point of wearing
              Message 6 of 17 , Dec 16, 2001
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                --- In HOn3@y..., "dougcoffey1950" <dougcoffey1950@y...> wrote:
                > Bob,
                > What exactly does the term "worn wheels" mean when applied to
                brass. I
                > have often seen this term and shied away because I thought perhaps
                the
                > plating was off the tires and worn down to the brass.
                > Since I operate the locomotives this would be a bad thing. If it
                > simply means the wheels show signs of wear from being operated on a
                > layout then it would not matter to me.
                > Please explain.
                > Doug

                When I see the term "worn wheels" in a listing, I generally assume
                that the wear is significant, perhaps to the point of wearing through
                to the brass. Bob S.
              • drgwbob
                ... Does the tire then need to be removed, and then reattached after plating? Bob S.
                Message 7 of 17 , Dec 16, 2001
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                  --- In HOn3@y..., Anne Ogborn <anniepoo@n...> wrote:
                  > Often a local jeweler can replate wheels.
                  >
                  >
                  > --
                  > Anne Ogborn
                  >
                  > Need motors? HOn30? Try Annie's Depot -
                  > http://www.idiom.com/~anniepoo/depot/index.html

                  Does the tire then need to be removed, and then reattached after
                  plating? Bob S.
                • Edward Loechler
                  Hi Doug: Ambiguity: I once sold a brass loco at The Caboose that they listed as worn wheels . It had scarring of the nickel plating but no wear through to the
                  Message 8 of 17 , Dec 17, 2001
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                    Hi Doug:

                    Ambiguity:
                    I once sold a brass loco at The Caboose that they listed as "worn wheels".
                    It had scarring of the nickel plating but no wear through to the brass.
                    Soemtimes brass dealers will not mention "worn wheels" (e.g., on their
                    webpage--for whatever reason), and this is something that you should ask
                    about when inquiring about a brass piece. And get a clear explanation of
                    what the "worn" means.

                    Concern:
                    The more rigosities in the drivers, the easier they pick up dirt and then
                    they run worse (less contact, more hesitations). This is especially true
                    if drivers have worn through to the brass. I avoid locos with worn wheels
                    for this reason.

                    Hypothesis:
                    I think that drivers get "worn" by picking up dirt and then when the dirty
                    portion turns to the track, an arc of electricity zaps the driver, which
                    begins the process of pitting. Once the pitting begins, drivers pick up
                    dirt more easily and...vicious cycle. I think it is important to clean
                    drivers often. And do not clean them using any kind of grinding mechanism.


                    A few thoughts.

                    Ed
                  • Anne Ogborn
                    ... I believe so. Be sure to have them mask the inside surface. Otherwise the plating will reduce the inside diameter by the plating thickness, which you will
                    Message 9 of 17 , Dec 17, 2001
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                      > Does the tire then need to be removed, and then reattached after
                      > plating? Bob S.

                      I believe so.

                      Be sure to have them mask the inside surface. Otherwise the plating will
                      reduce the inside diameter by the plating thickness, which you will not
                      like when you try to reassemble them.
                    • hobosteve
                      The general problem is that-for what reason ever - the builders use those d.... plated wheels instead of making them intire of nickel German) silver which is
                      Message 10 of 17 , Dec 19, 2001
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                        The general problem is that-for what reason ever - the builders use
                        those d.... plated wheels instead of making them intire of nickel
                        German) silver which is far less exposed to corrosion. Samhongsha and
                        other Korean builders did and do models for the European market with
                        nickel silver wheels for some years. So why not for US importerns ???
                        I think Overland and Hallmark are the only ones which prefer nickel
                        silver wheels.

                        I bought several engines where the plating was gone becaue I blacken
                        all my wheels after a cleaning process. So the brass surface is
                        sealed and the electrical pickup is excellent. I repeat this process
                        every 3-4 years (depending on the running time).


                        Steffen
                        Stoner Creek Miniatures


                        --- In HOn3@y..., Edward Loechler <loechler@b...> wrote:
                        > Hi Doug:
                        >
                        > Ambiguity:
                        > I once sold a brass loco at The Caboose that they listed as "worn
                        wheels".
                        > It had scarring of the nickel plating but no wear through to the
                        brass.
                        > Soemtimes brass dealers will not mention "worn wheels" (e.g., on
                        their
                        > webpage--for whatever reason), and this is something that you
                        should ask
                        > about when inquiring about a brass piece. And get a clear
                        explanation of
                        > what the "worn" means.
                        >
                        > Concern:
                        > The more rigosities in the drivers, the easier they pick up dirt
                        and then
                        > they run worse (less contact, more hesitations). This is
                        especially true
                        > if drivers have worn through to the brass. I avoid locos with worn
                        wheels
                        > for this reason.
                        >
                        > Hypothesis:
                        > I think that drivers get "worn" by picking up dirt and then when
                        the dirty
                        > portion turns to the track, an arc of electricity zaps the driver,
                        which
                        > begins the process of pitting. Once the pitting begins, drivers
                        pick up
                        > dirt more easily and...vicious cycle. I think it is important to
                        clean
                        > drivers often. And do not clean them using any kind of grinding
                        mechanism.
                        >
                        >
                        > A few thoughts.
                        >
                        > Ed
                      • purgatory1101
                        Steffen wrote: I blacken all my wheels after a cleaning process. So the brass surface is sealed and the electrical pickup is excellent. I repeat this process
                        Message 11 of 17 , Dec 19, 2001
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                          Steffen wrote:
                          I blacken all my wheels after a cleaning process. So the brass
                          surface is sealed and the electrical pickup is excellent. I repeat
                          this process every 3-4 years (depending on the running time).
                          =================================================================

                          Steffen,

                          Thanks for the tip, it makes good sense.

                          Paul Richardson
                          Purgatory & Devil River Railroad
                          Garland, Texas
                          http://pinecreekstation.home.attbi.com
                        • Edward Loechler
                          Steffen how do you blacken your worn wheels? Ed
                          Message 12 of 17 , Dec 19, 2001
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                            Steffen how do you blacken your worn wheels?

                            Ed
                          • afaprinz@t-online.de
                            Hello Ed, I think he uses blacken it ... You will find it in the Walthers catalog Andreas Prinz
                            Message 13 of 17 , Dec 19, 2001
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                              Hello Ed,

                              I think he uses "blacken it" ... You will find it in the Walthers catalog

                              Andreas Prinz
                            • hobosteve
                              Hi Andreas, tried blacken it, but found Pahl s much better. But when you can t get Pahl s blacken it is the best choice. Steffen ... catalog
                              Message 14 of 17 , Dec 20, 2001
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                                Hi Andreas,
                                tried blacken it, but found Pahl' s much better. But when you can't
                                get Pahl's blacken it is the best choice.

                                Steffen

                                --- In HOn3@y..., afaprinz@t... wrote:
                                > Hello Ed,
                                >
                                > I think he uses "blacken it" ... You will find it in the Walthers
                                catalog
                                >
                                > Andreas Prinz
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