Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: glues

Expand Messages
  • OWENEARL@xxx.xxx
    In a message dated 4/19/99 9:38:16 AM Eastern Daylight Time, Szczowicz@aol.com writes:
    Message 1 of 26 , Apr 19, 1999
    • 0 Attachment
      In a message dated 4/19/99 9:38:16 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
      Szczowicz@... writes:

      << My questions is glueing Evergreen plasticard siding onto wood. Can
      anyone suggest the best bond. >>

      I have used Goo and gap filling CCA, both worked, but I do not know what is
      "the best".

      Earl Owen
    • Mike Conder
      ... Assuming your plasticard is the same as our styrene (a good assumption, since it s from Evergreen), I would recommend simple plastic glue or MEK for
      Message 2 of 26 , Apr 19, 1999
      • 0 Attachment
        Szczowicz@... wrote:
        > There was some correspondance on adhensives some while back none of which I
        > can find. My questions is glueing Evergreen plasticard siding onto wood. Can
        > anyone suggest the best bond.

        Assuming your plasticard is the same as our styrene (a good assumption,
        since it's from Evergreen), I would recommend simple plastic glue or MEK
        for wood/styrene ... the sane thin stuff used for styrene/styrene. it
        melts the plastic, which then locks into the wood.

        Just need a bit of patience to let it dry completely before moving it.

        In your case, I'd experiment a bit first ... too much glue cab ruin the
        styrene.

        Mike Conder
      • HOn3MRR@aol.com
        Hi Mark.......... I hope I can,I sure hope this is within the prescribed limits of HOn3........... In a message dated 99-04-19 09:38:10 EDT, you write:
        Message 3 of 26 , Apr 19, 1999
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Mark..........

          I hope I can,I sure hope this is within the prescribed limits of
          HOn3...........

          In a message dated 99-04-19 09:38:10 EDT, you write:

          << My questions is glueing Evergreen plasticard siding onto wood. Can
          anyone suggest the best bond. >>

          My best results have come with good old Walthers GOO....BTW I have no
          interest in Walthers or GOO, I sure hope that this satisfy's all of the legal
          things and the hope that this is still in the realm of HOn3.

          Bill Martin
        • JimVice@xxx.xxx
          In a message dated 4/19/99 8:34:21 PM Pacific Daylight Time, HOn3MRR@aol.com ... Thanks Bill! I wanted to say that before but thought the general list is too
          Message 4 of 26 , Apr 19, 1999
          • 0 Attachment
            In a message dated 4/19/99 8:34:21 PM Pacific Daylight Time, HOn3MRR@...
            writes:

            > My best results have come with good old Walthers GOO

            Thanks Bill! I wanted to say that before but thought the general
            list is too high tech for that. This is one example of why Goo was
            packaged, to stick dissimilar objects together. I've been using
            it since 1955 including sticking some trimmed Kadee couplers into
            square channel brass to make quasi talgo's on some old Walthers
            passenger cars. Still holding fine all by itself. Of course I'm sure
            that there is better stuff out there today but I still use it a lot.

            Jim
          • Szczowicz@xxx.xxx
            Mike, Yes plasticard is styrene. Sorry, the old Engliash terminology creeps in when the fingers are flaying the keyboard. I ve experiment with MEK but find it
            Message 5 of 26 , Apr 20, 1999
            • 0 Attachment
              Mike,
              Yes plasticard is styrene. Sorry, the old Engliash terminology creeps in when
              the fingers are flaying the keyboard. I've experiment with MEK but find it
              dries very quickly. Do you apply it to the Evergreen or the wood or both?
              Many thanks
              Mark
            • Szczowicz@xxx.xxx
              In a message dated 4/20/99 4:34:17 AM GMT Daylight Time, HOn3MRR@aol.com writes:
              Message 6 of 26 , Apr 20, 1999
              • 0 Attachment
                In a message dated 4/20/99 4:34:17 AM GMT Daylight Time, HOn3MRR@...
                writes:

                << I sure hope that this satisfy's all of the legal
                things and the hope that this is still in the realm of HOn3. >>
                Bill,
                Hmmm. Not sure. Now about my full scale working model of an HOn3 whiskey
                still.....
                Thanks for the GOO idea - I've got Pliobond which the list assured was more
                or less the same. I tend to shy away from American adhesives only because
                they're so difficult to obtain here in England so I use them (it actually)
                very carefully - drop at a time.
                Regards
                Mark
              • Clark Womack
                For gluing styrene to wood I have been using RC-56 for years. RC-56 was developed for gluing plastic canopies on model airplanes. When a model airplane is in
                Message 7 of 26 , Apr 20, 1999
                • 0 Attachment
                  For gluing styrene to wood I have been using "RC-56" for years.
                  RC-56 was developed for gluing plastic canopies on model airplanes.
                  When a model airplane is in flight the stresses on it are considerably more
                  than we in model railroading will subject our structures to.
                  Clark Womack
                • boone@xxxxx.xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx)
                  ... Not so, Jim...Goo is STILL great stuff for it s intended purpose!!! The key, I think, is that it is flexible...and that allows it to hang in there when
                  Message 8 of 26 , Apr 20, 1999
                  • 0 Attachment
                    >From: JimVice@...
                    >
                    >In a message dated 4/19/99 8:34:21 PM Pacific Daylight Time, HOn3MRR@...
                    >writes:
                    >
                    >> My best results have come with good old Walthers GOO
                    >
                    >Thanks Bill! I wanted to say that before but thought the general
                    >list is too high tech for that. This is one example of why Goo was
                    >packaged, to stick dissimilar objects together. I've been using
                    >it since 1955 including sticking some trimmed Kadee couplers into
                    >square channel brass to make quasi talgo's on some old Walthers
                    >passenger cars. Still holding fine all by itself. Of course I'm sure
                    >that there is better stuff out there today but I still use it a lot.
                    >

                    Not so, Jim...Goo is STILL great stuff for it's intended purpose!!! The
                    key, I think, is that it is flexible...and that allows it to hang in there
                    when the more rigid glues fail...

                    Perhaps it's only near-equal is Pliobond, which appears to be similar in
                    composition and performance. One distinct advanted of Pliobond is the
                    availability of it in bubble packs at most hardware stores.

                    Aloha, Boone
                  • DARRYL L HUFFMAN
                    ... From: Boone Morrison Goo is STILL great stuff for it s intended purpose!!! The ... Faded memories. Your statement brought to mind my
                    Message 9 of 26 , Apr 20, 1999
                    • 0 Attachment
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: Boone Morrison <boone@...>
                      Goo is STILL great stuff for it's intended purpose!!! The
                      > key, I think, is that it is flexible...and that allows it to hang in there
                      > when the more rigid glues fail...

                      Faded memories. Your statement brought to mind my first attempt at making
                      an 0n30 Forney type locomotive out of an HO Docksider about 30 years ago.
                      This was back when Walthers was selling O scale "sand" castings. Crude,
                      crude, crude. I was able to order some Kemtrom domes, headlight, and bell.
                      But for the cab and tender(or is it water and fuel bunker) I decided to use
                      materials at hand-wood. For glue I used that Goo! that I had read so much
                      about. So I used Goo for the cab and fuel bunker.

                      Now that's where your words "flexible" and "hang" come in. That glue never
                      really set up, with the effect of having my watertank/fuel bunker
                      s-l-o-w-l-y droop over a period of weeks. I could straighten it out by
                      just pushing it back into place, but then it would slowly begin to sag
                      again.

                      Darryl Huffman
                      Anchorage, Alaska
                    • boone@xxxxx.xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx)
                      Darryl: Your story of drooping Goo is grand...had some of the same problems myself many years ago building 4-4-0 period engines out of Mantua Belle of the
                      Message 10 of 26 , Apr 20, 1999
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Darryl: Your story of "drooping" Goo is grand...had some of the same
                        problems myself many years ago building 4-4-0 period engines out of Mantua
                        Belle of the 80's units...modified the heck out of them and used Goo for a
                        lot of the parts assembly..same result.

                        BUT, I still have one of those some 45 years later and it is still
                        together...but still drooping also!!

                        Oh, Pliobond doesn't seem to "droop" as bad...and holds just as well.

                        Aloha, Boone
                      • Rick C Shoup
                        Jim, Goo is still one of the best. Tip: If you want it to be a little less rubbery, after gooing the two parts together, put a drop of crazy glue on the joint.
                        Message 11 of 26 , Apr 20, 1999
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Jim, Goo is still one of the best.
                          Tip: If you want it to be a little less rubbery, after gooing the two
                          parts together, put a drop of crazy glue on the joint. Won't ever come
                          apart and yet has a little "give". Also sets up a little faster.
                          This tip works for ambroid too. either goo with it or for a quicker set
                          with all the strength of the ambroid a drop of crazy glue will do
                          wonders.
                          Regards.......... Rick Shoup


                          On Tue, 20 Apr 1999 01:27:18 EDT JimVice@... writes:
                          >From: JimVice@...
                          >
                          >In a message dated 4/19/99 8:34:21 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
                          >HOn3MRR@...
                          >writes:
                          >
                          >> My best results have come with good old Walthers GOO
                          >
                          >Thanks Bill! I wanted to say that before but thought the general
                          >list is too high tech for that. This is one example of why Goo was
                          >packaged, to stick dissimilar objects together. I've been using
                          >it since 1955 including sticking some trimmed Kadee couplers into
                          >square channel brass to make quasi talgo's on some old Walthers
                          >passenger cars. Still holding fine all by itself. Of course I'm
                          >sure
                          >that there is better stuff out there today but I still use it a lot.
                          >
                          >Jim
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          >G-SHOCK SPORTS WATCH - Built Tough! Built Cool! G-SHOCK keeps you in
                          >Sync! Shock Resistant and Loaded with Features! Electo-luminescent,
                          >Satisfaction Guaranteed*No-Hassle Returns*Only $69 Free Freight in US
                          > http://www.onelist.com/ad/shoptheglobe6
                          >------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          >HOn3 web page is:
                          >http://www.railway-eng.com/hon3/
                          >

                          ___________________________________________________________________
                          You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail.
                          Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com/getjuno.html
                          or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]
                        • Chris C Short
                          I really like the good old Ambroid wood glue. It s just like Goo except maybe a little thinner and easier to use, and I think it s less expensive.
                          Message 12 of 26 , Apr 20, 1999
                          • 0 Attachment
                            I really like the good old Ambroid wood glue. It's just like Goo except
                            maybe a little thinner and easier to use, and I think it's less
                            expensive.




                            ___________________________________________________________________
                            You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail.
                            Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com/getjuno.html
                            or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]
                          • JimVice@aol.com
                            In a message dated 4/20/99 7:49:26 PM Pacific Daylight Time, rcshoup@juno.com ... Great tip Rick! I ve been using a drop of Tenax-7R (talk about mean stuff)
                            Message 13 of 26 , Apr 20, 1999
                            • 0 Attachment
                              In a message dated 4/20/99 7:49:26 PM Pacific Daylight Time, rcshoup@...
                              writes:

                              > put a drop of crazy glue on the joint. Won't ever come
                              > apart and yet has a little "give"

                              Great tip Rick! I've been using a drop of "Tenax-7R" (talk about
                              mean stuff) which works but I like the "crazy glue" idea better.

                              Jim
                            • Bruce Boldner
                              Rick, I ve missed something here. What is crazy glue? Do you mean superglue? Bruce Boldner. ... rcshoup@juno.com
                              Message 14 of 26 , Apr 21, 1999
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Rick,

                                I've missed something here. What is crazy glue? Do you mean superglue?

                                Bruce Boldner.

                                >In a message dated 4/20/99 7:49:26 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
                                rcshoup@...
                                >writes:
                                >
                                >> put a drop of crazy glue on the joint. Won't ever come
                                >> apart and yet has a little "give"
                              • Rick C Shoup
                                Yes, Super Glue name degenerated into Crazy Glue in the States. Importantly, for us Crazy Glue is lots cheaper. Look in unlikely stores: drug store, small
                                Message 15 of 26 , Apr 21, 1999
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Yes, Super Glue name degenerated into Crazy Glue in the States.
                                  Importantly, for us Crazy Glue is lots cheaper.

                                  Look in unlikely stores: drug store, small quick food shops, supermarket
                                  in addition to hardware store or lumber yard.
                                  I pay about $1.79 for the stuff.

                                  Ours is packaged by Elmers, but made in Japan would you believe? I buy
                                  the 2 gram size. Good shelf life and even will work after top is opened.
                                  Regards.......... Rick Shoup


                                  On Thu, 22 Apr 1999 08:27:51 +1000 Bruce Boldner
                                  <Bruce.Boldner@...> writes:
                                  >From: Bruce Boldner <Bruce.Boldner@...>
                                  >
                                  >Rick,
                                  >
                                  >I've missed something here. What is crazy glue? Do you mean
                                  >superglue?
                                  >
                                  >Bruce Boldner.
                                  >
                                  >>In a message dated 4/20/99 7:49:26 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
                                  >rcshoup@...
                                  >>writes:
                                  >>
                                  >>> put a drop of crazy glue on the joint. Won't ever come
                                  >>> apart and yet has a little "give"
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  >Share the wealth!
                                  >http://www.ONElist.com
                                  >Tell a friend about ONElist's 130,000 free e-mail communities!
                                  >------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  >HOn3 web page is:
                                  >http://www.railway-eng.com/hon3/
                                  >

                                  ___________________________________________________________________
                                  You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail.
                                  Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com/getjuno.html
                                  or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]
                                • Tom Troughton, MMR
                                  Hi Rick, Do you remember when ACC was first introduced as Eastman 9-10 cement sometimes back in the late 60 s? My father was an IBM customer service engineer
                                  Message 16 of 26 , Apr 21, 1999
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Hi Rick,

                                    Do you remember when ACC was first introduced as Eastman 9-10 cement
                                    sometimes back in the late '60's? My father was an IBM customer service
                                    engineer and used the stuff to fix many things inside those big gray
                                    machines with a THINK logo resting nearby.

                                    I guess the 9-10 meant that if you haven't separated your fingers in 9 or 10
                                    seconds, it was off to the emergency room for you.

                                    Take Care,

                                    Tom Troughton
                                    Jefferson City, MO

                                    -----Original Message-----
                                    From: Rick C Shoup <rcshoup@...>
                                    To: HOn3@onelist.com <HOn3@onelist.com>
                                    Date: Wednesday, April 21, 1999 9:48 PM
                                    Subject: [HOn3] Re: glues


                                    >From: Rick C Shoup <rcshoup@...>
                                    >
                                    >Yes, Super Glue name degenerated into Crazy Glue in the States.
                                    >Importantly, for us Crazy Glue is lots cheaper.
                                    >
                                    >Look in unlikely stores: drug store, small quick food shops, supermarket
                                    >in addition to hardware store or lumber yard.
                                    >I pay about $1.79 for the stuff.
                                    >
                                    >Ours is packaged by Elmers, but made in Japan would you believe? I buy
                                    >the 2 gram size. Good shelf life and even will work after top is opened.
                                    >Regards.......... Rick Shoup
                                  • JimVice@xxx.xxx
                                    In a message dated 4/21/99 8:05:24 PM Pacific Daylight Time, ... Originally developed to laminate optical lenses. Jim
                                    Message 17 of 26 , Apr 21, 1999
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      In a message dated 4/21/99 8:05:24 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
                                      tomt491@... writes:

                                      > Eastman 9-10 cement
                                      > sometimes back in the late '60's?

                                      Originally developed to laminate optical lenses.

                                      Jim
                                    • Charles A Davis
                                      ... That may have been one of the first commerciasl uses, but I thought it was a Korean Police action development, to replace suturing in Mash operating
                                      Message 18 of 26 , Apr 22, 1999
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        JimVice@... wrote:
                                        >
                                        > From: JimVice@...
                                        >
                                        > In a message dated 4/21/99 8:05:24 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
                                        > tomt491@... writes:
                                        >
                                        > > Eastman 9-10 cement
                                        > > sometimes back in the late '60's?
                                        >
                                        > Originally developed to laminate optical lenses.
                                        >
                                        > Jim
                                        >
                                        That may have been one of the first commerciasl uses, but I thought it
                                        was a Korean 'Police action' development, to replace 'suturing' in
                                        "Mash" operating rooms. (May just be one of those weird rumors that
                                        floats around now and then.)

                                        Chuck D.
                                      • JimVice@aol.com
                                        In a message dated 4/22/99 5:43:25 AM Pacific Daylight Time, cad@gamewood.net ... Nice try Chuck but it was invented before the Korean Police Action . War,
                                        Message 19 of 26 , Apr 22, 1999
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          In a message dated 4/22/99 5:43:25 AM Pacific Daylight Time, cad@...
                                          writes:

                                          > That may have been one of the first commerciasl uses, but I thought it
                                          > was a Korean 'Police action' development, to replace 'suturing' in
                                          > "Mash" operating rooms. (May just be one of those weird rumors that
                                          > floats around now and then.)
                                          >

                                          Nice try Chuck but it was invented before the Korean "Police Action".

                                          War, War, What war?

                                          Jim
                                        • Rick C Shoup
                                          It is used for that today. Especially cosmetic surgery. (Face lifting) Regards.......... Rick Shoup On Thu, 22 Apr 1999 07:38:26 -0400 Charles A Davis
                                          Message 20 of 26 , Apr 22, 1999
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            It is used for that today. Especially cosmetic surgery. (Face lifting)
                                            Regards.......... Rick Shoup


                                            On Thu, 22 Apr 1999 07:38:26 -0400 Charles A Davis <cad@...>
                                            writes:
                                            >From: Charles A Davis <cad@...>
                                            >
                                            >JimVice@... wrote:
                                            >>
                                            >> From: JimVice@...
                                            >>
                                            >> In a message dated 4/21/99 8:05:24 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
                                            >> tomt491@... writes:
                                            >>
                                            >> > Eastman 9-10 cement
                                            >> > sometimes back in the late '60's?
                                            >>
                                            >> Originally developed to laminate optical lenses.
                                            >>
                                            >> Jim
                                            >>
                                            >That may have been one of the first commerciasl uses, but I thought
                                            >it
                                            >was a Korean 'Police action' development, to replace 'suturing' in
                                            >"Mash" operating rooms. (May just be one of those weird rumors that
                                            >floats around now and then.)
                                            >
                                            >Chuck D.
                                            >
                                            >------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                            >G-SHOCK SPORTS WATCH - Built Tough! Built Cool! G-SHOCK keeps you in
                                            >Sync! Shock Resistant and Loaded with Features! Electo-luminescent,
                                            >Satisfaction Guaranteed*No-Hassle Returns*Only $69 Free Freight in US
                                            > http://www.onelist.com/ad/shoptheglobe6
                                            >------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                            >HOn3 web page is:
                                            >http://www.railway-eng.com/hon3/
                                            >

                                            ___________________________________________________________________
                                            You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail.
                                            Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com/getjuno.html
                                            or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]
                                          • Charles A Davis
                                            ... That _was_ back in the 50s Chuck D.
                                            Message 21 of 26 , Apr 22, 1999
                                            • 0 Attachment
                                              JimVice@... wrote:
                                              >
                                              > From: JimVice@...
                                              >
                                              > In a message dated 4/22/99 5:43:25 AM Pacific Daylight Time, cad@...
                                              > writes:
                                              >
                                              > > That may have been one of the first commerciasl uses, but I thought it
                                              > > was a Korean 'Police action' development, to replace 'suturing' in
                                              > > "Mash" operating rooms. (May just be one of those weird rumors that
                                              > > floats around now and then.)
                                              > >
                                              >
                                              > Nice try Chuck but it was invented before the Korean "Police Action".
                                              >
                                              > War, War, What war?
                                              >
                                              > Jim
                                              >
                                              That _was_ back in the '50s
                                              Chuck D.
                                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.