Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Volume 18 Issue 10

Expand Messages
  • Larry M Sivertson
    HOH-LD-News Vol. 18, Issue 10 March 6, 2004 Copyright (C) 2004 Hearing Loss Web. All rights reserved. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Table of Contents ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ -
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 6, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      HOH-LD-News
      Vol. 18, Issue 10
      March 6, 2004

      Copyright (C) 2004 Hearing Loss Web. All rights reserved.

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      Table of Contents
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      - Article 1: Listening With a "Third Ear" - FM Systems - Part 2
      - Article 2: Digital TV National Consumer Advisory Board Report - Part 2
      - Article 3: Cochlear Implants in Both Ears Help Deaf Localize
      Sound, Hear Speech in Noisy Backgrounds
      - Article 4: Airport's Innovation for Deaf
      - Classifieds
      - Contact Information and Disclaimers

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      Contact information and disclaimers are at the end of this
      newsletter.
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


      ------ Amplified Phones on Sale at Harris Communications -------
      Only one more week to save on amplified phones at Harris
      Communications. Some of our most popular phones are on sale now
      for up to 20% off retail price---you can save over $30!
      Telephones include models from Ameriphone and Williams Sound as
      well as modified Vtech phones. Find the model you like and save
      money. Hurry, sale ends March 14th. Check them all out at
      www.harriscomm.com/?source=hohnews or contact us at
      mailto:mail@... .
      ----------------------------------------------------------------


      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      - Article 1: Listening With a "Third Ear" - FM Systems - Part 2
      By Mark Ross Ph.D.
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Editor: Once again we're happy to bring you the thoughts of Dr.
      Mark Ross, one of our real hearing loss gurus. In this article
      Dr. Ross discusses FM Systems and how they are helpful in
      promoting better communications for people with hearing loss.

      This is Part two of three parts.

      Reprinted with permission from www.healthyhearing.com & Dr. Mark
      Ross

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Let's consider some situations in which having a "third" ear can
      be useful. I shall review situations I have experienced and I
      will comment on other potential applications, particularly in
      various employment situations.

      1.. One persistent problem people with hearing loss complain of
      is difficulty hearing their companion in a noisy restaurant. A
      personal FM system is made to order for this situation. The
      dining companion simply places the transmitter close to him/her,
      either on the table, or around the neck (a neck cord comes with
      the microphone) or in a pocket. That's all there is to it. My
      wife often reminds me to bring my FM system when we go to
      restaurants. It makes life easier for me and for her too.
      Without an FM System, talking to me in a noisy restaurant is a
      strain. She finds herself leaning over the table, struggling to
      make sure I understand. With the FM System, she can sit back and
      relax and we can converse easily.

      2.. The situation is not quite so easy when another person, or
      another couple is present. In these situations, the FM
      microphone has to be placed in the most strategic location, as
      close to everybody as possible. I usually place the microphone
      between the other people on the other side of the table. To hear
      the person next to me, I set the hearing aid to the FM/M
      position, so both the FM system and the hearing microphone are
      picking up sounds. This situation is far from perfect, but
      better than trying to hear two or three people with my regular
      hearing aids. Dinner with a large group of people, or at a
      banquet is often presents an impossible situation. In those
      large group situations, one can communicate effectively only
      with people immediately to one side or the other. The best bet
      for managing conversations in large groups is usually to employ
      directional microphone hearing aids, being sure to locate the
      major sources of noise to one's rear. In other words, taking
      advantage of a personal FM system does not mean ignoring the
      potential benefits of directional microphone hearing aids.

      3.. People with hearing loss watch the lips of the person
      speaking for good reason: it improves their understanding of
      speech. Combining hearing with vision allows for maximal
      communication. Virtually everybody "lip reads" or "speech reads"
      as acoustic signals deteriorate. However, when driving a car, it
      is not a good idea for the driver to watch the passenger's mouth
      while engaged in conversation! Safety while driving takes
      precedence! But we can have it both ways! By speaking into an FM
      microphone, the passenger can talk to a hard of hearing driver
      without the driver taking his or her attention away from the
      road. Whenever my wife and I take a drive in our car, I bring my
      FM system. I bring the FM system whenever we drive with another
      couple too. If we're in the back seat, I place the microphone
      between the two front seats when talking to the other couple. If
      the other couple is in the back seat, my wife places the
      microphone behind me or she hands the microphone to the people
      in the back seat. Again, not a perfect solution, but a lot
      better than depending on hearing aids alone.

      4.. A hand-held FM microphone is the best solution for hard of
      hearing people in noisy group situations, such as a reception or
      a cocktail party. At such events, people are often standing,
      talking, and milling around. All one needs to do is place the
      microphone as close to the lips of the conversational partner as
      is feasible. This can be awkward at first for both parties! Many
      hearing aid users feel this is a too public a display of their
      handicap (Yes -- hearing loss is a handicap no matter how one
      slices it or defines it). Some conversational partners may react
      negatively to having a microphone placed near their mouths
      (while others preen a bit while looking for the hidden camera!).
      It does take a modicum of assertiveness for hard of hearing
      people to use FM microphones in this manner, but in a little
      while, it becomes the most natural thing in the world. FM
      systems help illustrate that communication is a two-way street
      and that hard of hearing people bear the greatest responsibility
      for managing their handicap.

      5.. Many people enjoy watching TV at home. While at home, one
      can use any number of "permanent" TV listening systems to
      enhance comprehension (infrared, FM transmitters, floor loop
      systems, etc.). However, "permanent" systems are less practical
      when traveling. While traveling, the hard of hearing person can
      place their FM systems' microphone/transmitter next to the TV
      speaker. The close distance between the TV and the FM microphone
      ensures a loud and distortion-free signal transmitted to a
      listener. When I compare the FM transmission to what I would
      understand while using my hearing aids alone, there is a
      clear-cut advantage to the FM condition. When traveling with my
      wife, and while using my FM system, I can watch (and understand)
      TV without disturbing her while she reads.

      6.. I've used FM systems in many settings. FM has been useful
      during small meetings, while walking down the street in a noisy
      city, at lectures, and on various tours. The FM system makes it
      unnecessary for a hard of hearing person to elbow other people
      aside while trying to get close to the tour guide in order to
      hear! All that is necessary is for the tour guide to wear the FM
      microphone. I know of workers in noisy factories who use an FM
      system to talk to their supervisor or co-workers, interviewers
      who place the FM microphone close to an interviewee and hard of
      hearing teachers who require their students to talk into their
      "third" ear. I have personally "velcroed" the FM microphone to
      the loudspeaker of PA systems in places that did not supply
      assistive listening systems. An FM system can be used in any
      situation in which the desired source of sound is some distance
      from the listener. All it takes it some ingenuity and a fair
      amount of assertiveness.


      ------- Eye on Washington --------------------------------
      Stay informed and protect your rights! The Eye on
      Washington (EOW) is a national advocacy ezine published by
      the National Association of the Deaf (NAD) that focuses on
      activities occuring on Capitol Hill that affect deaf and
      hard of hearing civil rights.

      The EOW is open to all, members and non-members. It is
      distributed once a month, sometimes more.
      http://www.nad.org/ezine/ecommadmin.html
      ----------------------------------------------------------


      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      - Article 2: Digital TV National Consumer Advisory Board Report - Part 2
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Editor: Remember all the buzz about digital television (DTV)
      awhile ago? Then the whole thing seemed to just go away. It
      turns out that it didn't really go away, it just didn't have the
      visibility it initially had. Here's Cheryl Heppner's report on a
      meeting of the Digital TV National Consumer Advisory Board
      Presentation. It provides a great summary of DTV status and
      issues.

      And thanks to NVRC and Cheryl Heppner for this report. This is
      Part two of two parts.

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Presentation by Rick Chessen, Federal Communications Commission
      Media Bureau
      - The Media Bureau is working on DTV transition issues.
      - Rules are still being developed but the foundation is in
      place.
      - Consumers need information about why they should buy DTV and
      how it is better than analog.
      - Although there are not a lot of interactive programs, that may
      be the next area of growth.

      Content protection
      - Programs being broadcast must be protected from being illegaly
      distributed while giving consumers the ability to have the
      programs for their personal use.
      - Content protection has to include accessibility features.

      Distribution of DTV
      - The price of a DTV has dropped to below $1,000.
      - The FCC is trying to ensure that all TVs, whether flat screen,
      plasma, small or large size, etc. are DTV.

      Consumer Information
      - Labeling is being discussed to make it easier for consumers to
      understand the capabilities of TVs.
      - A survey found that 40% of Americans haven't heard of this
      transition to DTV.
      - It's expected that soon, with cooperation of the electronics
      industry, all TVs sold will have both analog and DTV capability.
      - In the future, only DTVs will be available.

      Pam Gregory, FCC Disability Rights Office (DRO)
      - The DRO doesn't work on captioning issues but works closely
      with the bureaus that do address them.
      - The FCC will hold a summit on March 26 on access issues
      related to homeland security.

      Martha Contee, FCC Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau
      - This bureau facilitates consumer complaints by web, e-mail,
      voice phone, TTY, fax.
      - They address only informal complaints; formal complaints are
      passed to the enforcement bureau.
      - They follow how complaints are referred and tracked.
      - A continuing problem with captioning-related complaints is
      that the FCC does not get sufficient information to take action.
      - In January 2004, of 38 complaints related to captioning, only
      7 had enough information to act upon.

      Information from the question/comment period following the
      presentations:
      - A Buyers Guide for Consumers on Buying DTV is being prepared
      by the FCC.
      - Some people will be impacted by monitors sold without DTV
      receivers; Gerry Field of WGBH has talked to some manufacturers
      and they now better understand the issue.
      - Reference was made to a Broadcast Content Protection
      proceeding with a comment deadline of March 3 that might impact
      captioning.
      - For DTV problems related to captioning, there are 2
      strategies: either to request rulemaking to clarify questions
      about the regulations or to file a formal complaint.
      - Some reports are coming in from consumers related to TiVo (a
      device which records program) and DirecTV. When played, the
      captions and the video were not in synchronization. The problem
      was traced to compression. DirecTV is aware of the problem and a
      fix is being worked on.

      Consumer Advisory Board Discussion

      1. Regulations require that any TV with a screen that is 13
      inches or larger has to have a built-in caption decoder chip. A
      complaint was filed by consumer organizations many years ago,
      related to captioning and PC-TV, on which no action was ever
      taken by the FCC. At the time, a large number of PC monitors of
      less than 13 inches-- and could be used as TVs -- had no cards
      with captioning capabilities. While the vast majority of
      monitors sold today are larger than 13 inches, it's still a
      relevant complaint because the number of devices with screens
      smaller than 13" and great resolution will spread. Larry
      Goldberg of WGBH passed around a PDA running a Star Wars movie
      segment with captions, which were small but readable.

      2. Consumers have great difficulty when shopping for a DTV and
      requesting a demonstration of the captioning features. Among the
      problems experienced are the confusion over what is a DTV. High
      definition (HD) TVs and large displays do not always have DTV
      capability. There are confusing terms like HDTV monitor and HDTV
      ready. Plasma screens have a separate box to control the video.
      These may not be connected to a device. Stores also control the
      programs that are shown to demonstrate the TVs, often in way
      that will make their pictures appear high quality, and to show
      co-op advertising. Thus the program available for testing a TV
      may not have digital captions. In addition, the sales people
      often have very little understanding of captioning and how to
      operate the caption features.

      Recommendation: If there is a set-top box with the TV, ask for
      its remote control. You may have to hunt or be persistent in
      your request, because some stores hide or lose them. One success
      is that consumer feedback is causing more TV manufacturers to
      put a caption button on the remote. If you don't see one, press
      the button for the menu and you should see something for closed
      captioning. An analog TVs is likely to have a caption on/off
      button, or a choice between CC1, CC2, etc. A DTV will give you
      choices of features such as different fonts, size of font,
      background color, and caption color.

      Recommendation #2: WGBH arranged for demonstration of four
      different DTV setups side by side at our meeting. Take your time
      and try all the features. The same font can look clearer and
      more pleasing on one TV than the other, and I also noted some
      real differences in how smoothly the captions scrolled up
      (without jerky movements) on one model.

      3. We discussed laws that might be used to require stores to
      always have captions activated on all their display TVs. Section
      255 of the Telecommunications Act covers only telecommunications
      products and services, not TVs. A question was raised about
      whether ADA Title III for access to public places might be used.
      This will need to be explored.

      4. WGBH was asked to develop a fact sheet with a checklist that
      would help consumers better understand what they should look for
      when shopping for a DTV.

      5. WGBH was also asked to assist in listing all DTV
      manufacturers and getting information about an appropriate
      contact person for each manufacturer. The Deaf and Hard of
      Hearing Consumer Advocacy Network coalition will then draft a
      letter asking each manufacturer to list all available DTV models
      and show which have the required DTV captioning features (called
      708 captions, as opposed to the analog's 608 captions). It was
      suggested that the manufacturers be given 6-8 weeks because
      collecting this information may take them some time. It may be
      possible to enlist the Consumer Electronics Association to
      support this project.

      6. The FCC's Consumer Advisory Council will have a meeting in
      March; it was suggested that problems related to captioning and
      DTV be raised during the public comment period.

      7. Another avenue consumer organizations should look at is
      involving a network of consumers across the US in requesting
      information from local stations what specific programs are being
      broadcast with DTV captions.

      Special Resource Note:

      Gerry Field of WGBH told me about an interesting website
      resource: www.titantv.com

      This website has been around a while and Gerry said it was
      recently revamped. I went to the TitanTV home page and clicked
      on a link that took me to a page to find the digital TV stations
      in my area. You type in your address and zip code, and it gives
      you a table of the results and DTV channels for them. For me,
      these include WRC, WTTG, WJLA, WUSA, WDCA, WMPT, WETA, WBDC,
      WNVT, WNVC, and WPXW. WFDC is due to start March 1, 2004 and
      WHUT is "under review". If I click on the TitanTV.com button at
      the bottom of the table, it shows digital channels available via
      cable or satellite.

      ***************
      (c)2004 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard
      of Hearing Persons (NVRC), www.nvrc.org. When sharing this
      information, please ensure credit is given to NVRC.


      ---------- Hearing Loss Web "New to Hearing Loss" Info ---------
      We are happy to announce a new website section specifically for
      people who are new to hearing loss. We have provided answers to
      the questions we are most frequently asked by people with newly
      identified hearing loss - and also to some questions people
      don't ask, but should! ;-) Check it out at
      http://www.hearinglossweb.com/Misc/new.htm. Please send
      questions, comments, or suggestions to larry@....
      ----------------------------------------------------------------


      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      - Article 3: Cochlear Implants in Both Ears Help Deaf Localize
      Sound, Hear Speech in Noisy Backgrounds
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Editor: We've recently started hearing about the benefit of
      bilateral cochlear implants (CIs), which means having a CI in
      each ear. This may not seem like a really good idea to the
      organizations that pay for the surgery, but it's becoming clear
      that the benefits to the recipient are considerable. (It's
      almost a common sense thing, and the same sort of progression
      from one ear to two occurred as the use of hearing aids
      increased. Here's a report from the Association for Research in
      Otolaryngology that itemizes some of the benefits of bilateral
      CIs.

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Newswise - In the United States alone, about 13,000 adults and
      nearly 10,000 children have received a cochlear implant, an
      electronic device that stimulates the hearing nerve in people
      with severe to profound hearing loss who can derive little or no
      benefit from hearing aids.

      Cochlear implants do not restore hearing; they allow deaf people
      to hear sounds, which the user must then interpret into speech.
      As with any electronic hearing device, a person with a cochlear
      implant faces distinctive communication challenges, particularly
      with localizing sound, i.e. identifying the location of sounds,
      and making sense of speech in a noisy environment.

      Typically, cochlear implants are implanted in just one ear.
      Researchers Ruth Litovsky and Patti Johnstone of the Waisman
      Center, University of Wisconsin, and Jennifer Arcaroli and Aaron
      Parkinson of Clinical Studies, Cochlear Americas, and the
      clinical team from Dallas Cochlear (Dr. Bob Peters and Jennifer
      Lake) questioned if having an implant in both ears (bilateral
      implantation) would improve the ability to localize sound and
      understand speech. The results of their study, "Effect of
      Experience on Sound Localization and Speech Intelligibility in
      Noise in Adults and Children with Bilateral Cochlear Implants,"
      will be presented at the Mid Winter Meeting of the Association
      for Research in Otolaryngology (http://www.aro.org) being held
      February 22-26, 2004 at the Adam's Mark Hotel, Daytona Beach,
      FL.

      Methodology: Two studies were completed; one on adults and
      another on children.

      Adults: Seventeen post-lingually deaf (deaf after development of
      speech) adults who had been deaf for less than 15 years received
      simultaneous bilateral cochlear implants (Nucleus(tm)). Ability
      to identify the location of sound was tested at three months
      post-surgery; ability to understand speech in noise was tested
      at three and six months post-surgery.

      Children: The children who were enrolled in this study, aged
      eight to 12, received cochlear implants successively (second
      implant after first successful implant). Children were tested on
      sound localization, right to left discrimination, and
      understanding of speech in noise using computerized games. Three
      children were tested at three and nine months post-activation of
      the implant, and some children were only tested at nine months.
      Several children with a unilateral cochlear implant also
      participated. In order to assess the extent to which bilateral
      cochlear implants improve performance, testing was conducted
      with both cochlear implants activated, and with only one implant
      activated.

      Results:

      Adults: None of the adults had identical hearing in both ears
      post-surgically. Each demonstrated a "good" or "bad" ear, the
      determination of which was highly correlated with pre-surgery
      audiological assessment. Speech in quiet discrimination scores
      ranged from five to 25 percent. For the majority of adults,
      sound localization performance is significantly better under
      bilateral conditions compared with either ear in isolation. On
      the speech tests, performance is significantly better under a
      number of conditions with competing noise, and the bilateral
      benefit was especially evident at six months post-activation
      compared with three months.

      Children: The largest benefit from bilateral cochlear implants
      was observed in speech understanding in the presence of
      interfering speech, as well as in quiet. Children also showed
      improvement with experience, as noted by better performance at
      nine months than three months after activation of the second
      cochlear implant. However, performance on sound localization and
      right/left discrimination was generally poor with little
      evidence for improved performance with bilateral cochlear
      implants.

      Conclusion: This work suggests that bilateral cochlear implants
      can improve sound localization and the ability to understand
      speech in a noisy environment in adults. In children, the
      benefit was especially noted in the speech-in-noise tests. The
      ability to fully recognize the benefit of having two cochlear
      implants may require time after implantation during which the
      user learns to use both ears and to utilize binaural cues.


      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      - Article 4: Airport's Innovation for Deaf
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Editor: If people with hearing loss are supposed to have equal
      access in public places, why is there STILL no system in place
      to provide decent communications in airports? I don't have a
      good answer for that, but there is encouraging news coming from
      England. The Birmingham airport has recently introduced a device
      that may evolve into a very capable system. Here's the report
      from the Birmingham Post. Our thanks for their permission to
      share this with you.

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Birmingham International Airport has become the first in the UK
      to introduce an innovative alerter system for passengers,
      visitors and staff who are deaf or hard of hearing.

      The �22,000 Deaf Alerter system notifies the user via a small
      hand-held unit, known as an alerter, in the event of a fire
      alarm situation.

      Permanently connected to the airport's fire alarm system, Deaf
      Alerter responds immediately to an alarm activation and
      transmits a message simultaneously to each alerter.

      Once triggered, the alerter will vibrate and flash to attract
      the wearer's attention and will continue until the person is
      outside the building.

      It is anticipated that in the future the system will be
      programmed to provide flight and boarding information.

      Cathy Hill, general manager of customer services for BIA, said:
      "This initiative demonstrates our commitment to making BIA safer
      and more accessible for people with disabilities.

      "Over the years we have invested in a number of facilities to
      assist deaf and hard-of-hearing people, including textphones, a
      minicom system and induction loops. Furthermore, a number of our
      employees have learnt the art of sign language to help to
      communicate with our passengers and ease their journey."

      She added: "I'm so happy that we can now provide this new
      system, which will ultimately give our deaf and hard-of-hearing
      passengers and our employees more freedom and confidence whilst
      they are at Birmingham Airport."

      Bryan Sheppard, chief executive of BID Services with Deaf People
      in Birmingham, praised the airport for its commitment to helping
      deaf and hard of hearing people.

      "BIA has constantly been at the forefront of ensuring equality
      for deaf people with disabilities - being the first airport in
      the UK to introduce this system proves this commitment."

      Deaf Alerter's technical director, Martyn Coldicott, added:
      "Deaf Alerter is delighted to have been able to assist BIA in
      their efforts to comply with the Disability Discrimination Act,
      by making their services accessible to deaf passengers."


      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      - Classifieds
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Two Events and six Employment Opportunities in this issue. (Ads
      appear after this brief table of contents.)

      Event 1
      ALDAcon 2004 Offers Variety of Promotional Opportunities
      You Can Take Advantage of these Opportunities From Anywhere
      Up Until ALDAcon 2004 in September

      Event 2
      Certified Deaf Interpreter (CDI) Training
      Hempstead, NY
      March 12 - 14, 2004

      Employment Opportunity 1
      Staff Interpreter
      JCIL Deaf & Hard of Hearing Svcs
      Jackson, TN

      Employment Opportunity 2
      Several Positions
      South Dakota School for the Deaf
      Sioux Falls, SD

      Employment Opportunity 3
      Principal, PK-12
      Idaho School for the Deaf and the Blind (ISDB)
      Gooding, Idaho

      Employment Opportunity 4
      Director of Curriculum and Special Education Services
      Idaho School for the Deaf and the Blind (ISDB)
      Gooding, Idaho

      Employment Opportunity 5
      High School Supervising Teacher
      Oregon School for the Deaf
      Salem, Oregon

      Employment Opportunity 6
      Kindergarten - 1st Grade Auditory-Oral Teacher
      Idaho School for the Deaf and the Blind (ISDB)
      Boise, Idaho


      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      Event 1
      ALDAcon 2004 Offers Variety of Promotional Opportunities
      You Can Take Advantage of these Opportunities From Anywhere
      Up Until ALDAcon 2004 in September
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      ALDAcon 2004! You Can Help Us! We Can Help You!

      There are several ways for vendors of products and services to
      participate in ALDAcon 2004. We anticipate over 300 members to
      attend. BUT, the contacts don't end there. Many of our national
      members are also members in their local chapters. And they take
      home information and materials that they collect at ALDAcon to
      share.

      ALDAcon is always an excellent opportunity to show products and
      services that enhance the lives of those with severe hearing
      losses. For many of our first-time attendees, this is the first
      opportunity they have had to see ANY materials developed to make
      their lives easier. We also are always glad to have any vendors
      who seek to develop a previously untapped group of consumers.
      Your product does not have to relate directly to hearing loss.

      Major ALDAcon events are available for sponsorship. If your
      company is interested in sponsoring a meal, coffee-break,
      speaker or other event during ALDAcon, please contact Mary Clark
      at ldmpoppins@... or (708)524-0144 TTY. All sponsors are
      acknowledged in the program book and at the event sponsored.

      The exhibit area is in direct flow to registration, workshop and
      the silent auction. Coffee breaks will be held in this area to
      encourage our members to explore the exciting exhibits.
      Exhibits must be in place by 10 a.m., Thursday, Sept. 2nd and
      dismantled by 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 4th. Exhibits are
      expected to be open each day, all day. The exhibit room will be
      locked during non-exhibit hours. A 6 x 30" skirted table and
      two chairs will be provided. Electricity and phone lines are
      extra. Fees for tables are available for businesses, government
      agencies and non-profit organizations.

      Another option is to place an advertisement in the 'con program
      book. This provides a handy reference for members to carry
      home. Ads in the program book vary from $35 for a business card
      size ad to $300 for a cover (inside or outside, or back).

      Two other options are available for sharing your information
      with ALDAns. You may have materials put in the registration
      tote bags for a "stuffing fee" of $150 or you may have
      information placed on a table (limited to 300 copies) for a fee
      of $75

      For the exhibits, the program book, and the registration bags,
      contact Kathy Schlueter at KSCtryLn@... or Captel Voice
      1-877-243-2823, then enter (815) 789-4537.

      One of the "hot" sites at ALDAcon is our Silent Auction! We
      invite you to donate an item which will surely create some
      competitive bidding! To learn more about the auction, including
      shipping information, contact Helen Ferrara at
      matt812@... or (508)378-6000.

      For more information on ALDAcon 2004, check out
      www.aldaboston.org/con_2004.htm
      We're looking forward to seeing you in Burlington, Vermont,
      September 1st through 5th!


      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      Event 2
      Certified Deaf Interpreter (CDI) Training
      Hempstead, NY
      March 12 - 14, 2004
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Mill Neck Sponsors Three-Day Deaf Interpreter Training Seminar

      Mill Neck Interpreter Service is proud to announce its upcoming
      Certified Deaf Interpreter (CDI) training course. This three-
      day training workshop is designed to introduce Deaf individuals
      to the field of interpretation. While seminar participants will
      not leave with National RID certification, they will receive the
      16 hours of the ethical and interpretation studies recommended
      by RID.

      Topics to be covered include cultural and linguistic
      considerations, ethical studies and expectations of the NRID CDI
      exam preparatory. Held at Hofstra University on March 12, 13 and
      14, this seminar will be presented by certified interpreter
      educator Carole Lazorisak, MA, CDI, ASLTA Professional, a
      lecturer at CUNY's LaGuardia Community College.

      For more information about this workshop or to enroll, please
      e-mail Judi Rackovitch at judirocks10@... or call (516)
      512-6222. TTY users can call 512-6260. Space is limited, so
      please act quickly!


      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      Employment Opportunity 1
      Staff Interpreter
      JCIL Deaf & Hard of Hearing Svcs
      Jackson, TN
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Full-Time Staff Interpreter

      Requirements:
      RID CI or NAD IV/V Nationally Certified.
      Three years minimum experience.
      ITP Degree Preferred w/Certification.

      Three Letters of Recommendation from Professionals in the field
      of interpreting.

      Benefits: Health & Dental Insurance, Vacation, Sick Leave,
      Travel & Training expenditure reimbursements.

      Salary: $33,000.00 annually
      $2,000.00 sign on bonus

      Please send resumes with proof of requirements to:

      JCIL Deaf & Hard of Hearing Svcs (JDHHS)
      ATTN: Gerrilynn Caudill, Director
      1981 Hollywood Drive
      Jackson, TN 38305
      E-Mail: gerrilynn@...
      FAX: 731.668.0406


      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      Employment Opportunity 2
      Several Positions
      South Dakota School for the Deaf
      Sioux Falls, SD
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      The South Dakota School for the Deaf is seeking applicants for
      the following positions for 2004/2005:

      * K-12 Art Teacher for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (9-mo.)
      * K-8 Elementary Teacher for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
      (9-mo.)
      * Secondary Education Teacher for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
      with 7-12 Math Endorsement (9-mo.)
      * Outreach Consultant for the Southeastern Area of South Dakota
      (10-month, full-time)
      * Auditory Oral Teachers for Cochlear Implant Students
      (Positions available: Preschool, 1st/2nd Grade, and
      2nd/3rdGrade, all 9-month positions)

      Send resume, transcripts, and three (3) work references to:

      Office of Human Resources at the South Dakota School f/t Deaf
      2001 East 8th Street
      Sioux Falls, SD 57103-1899
      (605) 367-5200 (Voice/TDD) or (605) 367-5209 (Fax)

      The SDSD does not discriminate on the basis of race, color,
      national origin, sex, religion, age or disability in employment
      or the provision of service.


      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      Employment Opportunity 3
      Principal, PK-12
      Idaho School for the Deaf and the Blind (ISDB)
      Gooding, Idaho
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Serving Deaf, Hard of Hearing, Blind and Visually Impaired
      Students of Idaho Since 1906

      STARTING DATE: August 2004

      SALARY RANGE: $40,000 --- $60,000 (Depending on Experience);
      11-month contract

      BENEFITS: Comprehensive fringe benefit package included. (see
      detailed description on Division of Human Resources website at:
      www.dhr.state.id.us)

      DESIRED QUALIFICATIONS:
      - Master's degree in Education of the Blind and/or Deaf
      preferred.
      - Idaho Exceptional Child with Hearing and/or Visually Impaired
      Endorsement or equivalent from another state. (willing to accept
      training if deficient in one of the sensory modalities)
      - Idaho Principal K-12 School Administration Certification.
      - Able to communicate fluently in sign language. (willing to be
      evaluated by ISDB staff)
      - Administrative experience in a residential school setting
      preferred.

      DUTIES:
      - Administration of a comprehensive Pre-K to 12th grade program
      - Provide strong leadership to the elementary, middle, high
      school and special needs support teams on the main campus.
      - Supervise and evaluate permanent faculty and substitute
      teachers in all departments.
      - Responsible for developing overall school-wide and teacher
      schedules.
      - Contribute to fiscal management and oversight of education
      programs.
      - The Principal reports directly to the Superintendent and is a
      member of the school's Administrative Leadership Team.
      - Other responsibilities deemed appropriate by the
      Superintendent.

      LOCATION: ISDB is located in Gooding, Idaho (pop. 3,500) a small
      agricultural community located in south central Idaho within a
      short distance to mountains, rivers and related outdoor
      activities. The City of Gooding is a family oriented community.
      For more information about ISDB check our website at:
      http://www.isdb.state.id.us

      APPLICATION PROCEDURES: Apply by submitting a letter of
      application, resume, transcripts, teaching certification and
      three letters of reference.

      Please tell us if we may contact your current employer.

      DEADLINE: March 31, 2004

      FOR MORE INFO: CONTACT: Ms. Sherry Hann, Director of Human
      Resources at 208-934-4457(V/TTY) or send email to:
      shann@...

      Successful candidate is required to complete a background check
      within three months of employment per Idaho Code 33-130


      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      Employment Opportunity 4
      Director of Curriculum and Special Education Services
      Idaho School for the Deaf and the Blind (ISDB)
      Gooding, Idaho
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Serving Deaf, Hard of Hearing, Blind and Visually Impaired
      Students of Idaho Since 1906

      STARTING DATE: August, 2004

      SALARY RANGE: $47,000 - $70,000 (Depending on Experience);
      12-month contract.

      BENEFITS: Comprehensive fringe benefit package included. (see
      detailed description on Division of Human Resources website
      http://www.dhr.state.id.us )

      DESIRED QUALIFICATIONS:
      - Master's degree in Special Education, School Administration,
      Curriculum Development or other related fields.
      - Idaho Exceptional Child with Hearing and/or Visual Impaired
      Endorsement or equivalent from another state.
      - Experience with curriculum development at school district
      level.
      - Administrative experience in a residential school setting
      preferred.
      - Able to communicate in sign language (to be evaluated by ISDB
      staff) or willing to enter in-house training program.
      - Knowledge of Approaches and Techniques for Blind and/or Deaf
      Education.

      (willing to accept training if deficient in one of the sensory
      modalities)

      DUTIES:
      - Team leadership in curriculum development and special
      education services.
      - Consult with Principal on daily school activities.
      - Educational program development for elementary, middle, high
      school and special needs levels.
      - Consult with Cottage Life Program (including health care)
      Special Services, and Outreach Programs.
      - Develop, plan, and implement school-wide curricula.
      - Contribute to fiscal management and oversight of education
      programs.
      - Supervise IEP Process in accordance with State and Federal
      laws and regulations.
      - The Director of Curriculum and Special Education Services
      reports directly to the Superintendent and is a member of the
      school's Administrative Leadership Team.
      - Other responsibilities deemed appropriate by the
      Superintendent.

      LOCATION: ISDB is located in Gooding, Idaho (pop. 3,500) a small
      agricultural community located in south central Idaho within a
      short distance to mountains, rivers and related outdoor
      activities. The city of Gooding is a quiet, family oriented
      community. For more information about ISDB check our website at:
      http://www.isdb.state.id.us

      APPLICATION PROCEDURES: Apply by submitting a letter of
      application, resume, transcripts, teaching certification, and
      three letters of reference.

      Please tell us if we may contact your current employer.

      DEADLINE: March 31, 2004.

      FOR MORE INFO CONTACT: Ms. Sherry Hann, Director of Human
      Resources at 208-934-4457 (V/TTY) or send email to:
      shann@...

      Successful candidate is required to complete a background check
      within three months of employment per Idaho Code 33-130.


      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      Employment Opportunity 5
      High School Supervising Teacher
      Oregon School for the Deaf
      Salem, Oregon
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      $31,572 - $58,872 Annually

      There is one permanent, full-time management position available
      at the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem, Oregon.

      Required qualifications:
      * Have four (4) years of teaching experience with
      deaf/hard-of-hearing students; and
      * Qualify for an Oregon Administrative License/Certificate; and
      * Have level 2 fluency in American Sign Language as measured by
      the ASLPI at the time of hire and qualify to reach Level 3
      within 3 years of hire.
      * Have effective professional and personal communication skills,
      both written and verbal/signed

      Preference may be given to applicants with two or more of these
      additional qualifications:
      * 5 years or more of teaching experience at the high school
      level,
      * Supervisory or administrative experience in an educational
      program for deaf/hard of hearing students,
      * Level 3 or higher fluency in American Sign Language as
      measured by the ASLPI.

      For information on how to apply for an Oregon teaching license
      and/or certificate, contact Oregon Teacher Standards and
      Practices Commission at 503/378-3586 or www.tspc.state.or.us.

      The Oregon School for the Deaf (OSD) provides a 24-education and
      residential program for approximately 130 deaf/hard of hearing
      students from K-12 grades. The High School Department provides
      academic and special-needs services to hearing-impaired high
      school students and to post-secondary students who continue to
      have unmet needs in transitioning to adult life. Students
      receive individualized instruction in small group settings as
      outlined by their IEPs (Individualized Education Programs). For
      further information about OSD, go to www.osd.k12.or.us.

      For information contact Liz Snook at liz.snook@... or
      call 503/378-3600 x4445 or 503/378-2892 tty. The announcement
      and PD100 application may be accessed at www.oregonjobs.org.

      ANNOUNCEMENT NUMBER: UC058175
      OPEN: FEBRUARY 24, 2004
      CLOSE: APRIL 23, 2004


      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      Employment Opportunity 6
      Kindergarten - 1st Grade Auditory-Oral Teacher
      Idaho School for the Deaf and the Blind (ISDB)
      Boise, Idaho
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Idaho School for the Deaf and the Blind (ISDB)

      Serving Deaf, Hard of Hearing, Blind and Visually Impaired
      Students of Idaho Since 1906

      POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT
      Kindergarten - 1st Grade
      Auditory-Oral
      TEACHER OF THE DEAF/HH - BOISE

      STARTING DATE: August 9, 2004

      SALARY RANGE:
      Commensurate with education and experience levels, based on 185
      day contract.

      BENEFITS:
      Comprehensive fringe benefit package included.
      Employees and spouses receive reduced tuition at state
      universities ($5 per credit hour).

      MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:
      * Eligible for Idaho Teacher Certification for Hearing Impaired.
      * Certification in Early Childhood preferred.
      * Master's degree preferred.
      * Excellent skills in developing use of spoken language and
      audition.
      * Experience teaching deaf children in an oral/aural setting
      preferred

      DUTIES:
      * Provide educational services to kindergarten-1st grade
      deaf/hard of hearing students.
      * Provide oral/aural skills instruction to parents and family
      members.
      * Provide information to parents related to their deaf child.

      LOCATION:
      Boise, ID with occasional trips to the ISDB main campus in
      Gooding, ID.
      Boise is the capitol of Idaho and a major city featuring several
      universities, cultural, recreational and nightlife
      opportunities. For more information check our website at:
      www.isdb.state.id.us

      APPLICATION PROCEDURES: Submit:
      1. Letter of application
      2. Copies of certification
      3. Three letters of recommendation
      4. Official transcripts
      5. Resume

      SUBMIT TO:
      Human Resource Office, ISDB
      1450 Main Street, Gooding, Idaho 83330

      DEADLINE: Open until filled.

      FOR MORE INFO CONTACT:
      Ms. Sherry Hann, Human Resource Director, at 208-934-4457
      (V/TTY)
      or send email to: shann@...

      Successful candidate will be required to furnish a background
      check within three months of employment per Idaho Code 33-130.

      1450 Main Street
      Gooding, ID 83330-1899
      (208) 934-4457 TTY/V (208) 934-8352 FAX

      We are an Equal Opportunity Employer. We do not discriminate on
      the basis of race, religion, color, gender, age, national origin
      or disability.


      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      - Contact Information and Disclaimers
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      We are very interested in your comments concerning the content
      and format of this newsletter. We want this publication to be
      useful to you. Please send your comments and suggestions to:
      hearinglossweb@...

      Visit our Website at: http://www.hearinglossweb.com

      To subscribe to this newsletter. Email
      HOH-LD-News-subscribe@yahoogroups.com. Yahoogroups will respond
      with a subscription email.

      To unsubscribe to this newsletter, email
      HOH-LD-News-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com. Yahoogroups will
      respond with an unsubscription email.

      Archives for this newsletter are on our website at:
      http://www.hearinglossweb.com.
      Click on "HOH-LD-News" in the header.

      Advertising information for HOH-LD-News and Hearing Loss Web is
      available at http://www.hearinglossweb.com/Misc/adv/adv.htm.

      Publication of articles or advertisements does not constitute an
      endorsement of the products or services offered, nor of the
      companies that offer them.

      Copyright (C) 2004 Hearing Loss Web. All rights reserved.
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.