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    KAISER DAILY HIV/AIDS REPORT A service of kaisernetwork.org http://www.kaisernetwork.org/dailyreports/hiv ________________________________________Tuesday,
    Message 1 of 275 , Jul 1, 2003
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      KAISER DAILY HIV/AIDS REPORT
      A service of kaisernetwork.org
      http://www.kaisernetwork.org/dailyreports/hiv
      ________________________________________



      Tuesday, July 1, 2003

      POLITICS AND POLICY
      ========================================
      1. 151 AIDS Organizations, Advocacy Groups Ask Bush To Increase Domestic
      AIDS Funding, Suspend Potential Regulatory 'Censorship'


      GLOBAL CHALLENGES
      ========================================
      2. HIV/AIDS Epidemic Hindering Agricultural Output, Threatening Millions
      With Hunger, Poverty, FAO/UNAIDS Report Says

      3. Southern African Development Community To Create Plan To Fight AIDS in
      Region


      ACROSS THE NATION
      ========================================
      4. African-American, Hispanic Men Who Have Sex With Men Spreading HIV To
      Minority Heterosexual Women, Study Shows

      5. Philadelphia Inquirer Examines Increase in Number of HIV/AIDS Cases
      Among Women


      SCIENCE & MEDICINE
      ========================================
      6. Irish Researcher Identifies Previously Undiscovered Strain of HIV


      OPINION
      ========================================
      7. Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report Summarizes Editorials on Bush's Upcoming
      Trip to Africa

      ****************************************

      POLITICS AND POLICY


      1. 151 AIDS Organizations, Advocacy Groups Ask Bush To Increase Domestic
      AIDS Funding, Suspend Potential Regulatory 'Censorship'

      Access this story and related links online:
      http://www.kaisernetwork.org/daily_reports/rep_index.cfm?DR_ID=18561

      A group of 151 AIDS organizations and other advocacy groups yesterday sent
      a letter to President Bush outlining their concerns about the Bush
      administration's policies concerning domestic HIV funding levels and the
      potential "censorship" of prevention programs and federally funded
      research, as well as the CDC's new HIV prevention initiative. The group
      also sent the letter to members of Congress and the 2004 Democratic
      presidential candidates. Several recent events, including the CDC's request
      that the STOP AIDS Project to discontinue some of its HIV prevention
      workshops, "appear to prioritize political ideology over sound science and
      public health practices," the groups say in the letter (Letter text, 6/20).
      The CDC on June 13 informed STOP AIDS in a letter that some of the group's
      HIV prevention workshops violate a Public Health Service Act ban on
      encouraging sexual activity and asked the group to discontinue the
      workshops, four months after an agency review found that the workshops were
      acceptable (Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, 6/16). Such "regressive policies
      of censorship and intimidation -- both regulatory and informal -- ... put
      American lives at risk" and will increase the number of new HIV cases, the
      groups say. The groups continue, "This trend is not acceptable and works
      against not just the health and safety of at-risk groups, but the health
      and safety of all citizens. We need your leadership on this issue." The
      groups ask that the administration:

      * Increase funding for domestic HIV/AIDS programs;

      * Ensure that new CDC HIV prevention guidelines allow "comprehensive
      prevention strategies" for those most at risk;

      * Allow local groups to continue to operate "culturally relevant"
      prevention programs without the "relentless and intrusive" scrutiny of the
      CDC;

      * Allow comprehensive sex education programs that address the use and
      efficacy of condoms; and

      * Protect science from the "clear censorship of potentially life-saving
      information."

      The groups conclude, "Mr. President, your administration has the
      responsibility to support sound public health and science-based HIV
      prevention models and programs that allow all Americans to benefit from
      research and public health policy without regard to the divisive politics
      of a few politicians" (Letter text, 6/20).

      GLOBAL CHALLENGES


      2. HIV/AIDS Epidemic Hindering Agricultural Output, Threatening Millions
      With Hunger, Poverty, FAO/UNAIDS Report Says

      Access this story and related links online:
      http://www.kaisernetwork.org/daily_reports/rep_index.cfm?DR_ID=18562

      The HIV/AIDS epidemic in Africa is affecting agricultural output and
      threatening millions of people with poverty and hunger, according to a
      joint report released yesterday by UNAIDS and the U.N. Food and Agriculture
      Organization. The report, titled "Addressing the Impact of HIV/AIDS on
      Ministries of Agriculture: Focus on Eastern and Southern Africa," calls
      for agricultural institutions to scale up their efforts to combat HIV/AIDS.
      FAO Director-General Dr. Jacques Diouf and UNAIDS Executive Director Dr.
      Peter Piot presented the report during the U.N. Economic and Social
      Council's 2003 session, which ends July 25 (FAO/UNAIDS release, 6/30).
      According to the report, approximately 30 million of the 42 million people
      living with HIV/AIDS are in sub-Saharan Africa, and more than 50% of them
      are in rural areas. In addition, up to 80% of the population in Southern
      Africa depends on small-scale agriculture for food and livelihood, Agence
      France-Presse reports. Many countries in the region are likely to see 25%
      of their farmers affected by HIV/AIDS, according to the report (Agence
      France-Presse, 6/30). Piot said, "The majority of African countries
      worst-hit by HIV/AIDS are also those heavily reliant on agriculture. For
      many rural households in these countries, AIDS has turned what used to be a
      food shortage into a food crisis." Diouf said, "Hunger and poverty,
      aggravated by HIV/AIDS, create a vicious spiral," adding, "Where farmers
      and their families fall sick, they cultivate less land and shift to less
      labor-intensive and less nutritious crops, agricultural productivity
      decreases and hunger and malnutrition are on the rise. Many children are
      losing their parents before learning how to farm, to prepare food and to
      fend for themselves. Severe malnutrition among orphans is already reported
      in the worst affected areas" (FAO/UNAIDS release, 6/30).

      3. Southern African Development Community To Create Plan To Fight AIDS in
      Region

      Access this story and related links online:
      http://www.kaisernetwork.org/daily_reports/rep_index.cfm?DR_ID=18563

      The 14 member nations of the Southern African Development Community are
      scheduled to meet on Friday in Lesotho to develop a joint plan to combat
      AIDS in the region, officials announced last week, Reuters reports. The
      region, where about 1% of the world's population lives, has an estimated
      40% of the world's HIV-positive people, according to the United Nations
      Development Programme. "Despite all our efforts, the disease is not
      abating. By sharing our experiences in care, treatment and education about
      HIV/AIDS, we might be able to come up with a successful common strategy,"
      Esther Kanaimba, SADC spokesperson, said. The SADC member nations include
      Angola, Botswana, Democratic Republic of Congo, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius,
      Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia
      and Zimbabwe (Reuters, 6/27).

      ACROSS THE NATION


      4. African-American, Hispanic Men Who Have Sex With Men Spreading HIV To
      Minority Heterosexual Women, Study Shows

      Access this story and related links online:
      http://www.kaisernetwork.org/daily_reports/rep_index.cfm?DR_ID=18564

      Although HIV-positive African-American and Hispanic men are more likely
      than their white counterparts to have sex with both men and women,
      African-American and Hispanic women are less likely than white women to
      know that their partners have sex with both men and women, according to
      results from a study that is scheduled to be published later this year, the
      Detroit News reports. The study, conducted by the Michigan Department of
      Community Health and the CDC, used data from state health departments in
      Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, New Jersey, New
      Mexico, South Carolina and Washington, as well as data from the Los Angeles
      County Health Department. According to the study, 34% of HIV-positive
      African-American men said that they had engaged in sex with both women and
      men, compared with 26% of HIV-positive Hispanic men and 13% of HIV-positive
      white men. However, among HIV-positive women, 14% of white women said that
      they knew their partners had also had sex with men, compared with 6% of
      African-American and Hispanic women. The disparity in awareness is partly
      responsible for the rapid spread of HIV in minority communities, according
      to the AIDS CARE study. In 2001, 12% of the U.S. population was African
      American, but African Americans represented 50% of the new HIV cases
      reported in that year, according to the News. In addition, HIV/AIDS is the
      leading cause of death for African-American women ages 25 to 34, and the
      disease is among the top three leading causes of death for African-American
      women ages 35 to 44 and black men ages 25 to 54, according to the News.

      Reaction


      The study "confirms what people have been saying and what they knew
      anecdotally," Loretta Davis Satterla, director of the division of
      HIV/AIDS-STDs at the Michigan Department of Community Health, said. "This
      is not a myth," Eve Mokotoff, chief of HIV/AIDS epidemiology at the
      Michigan Department of Community Health and lead author of the study, said,
      adding, "We interviewed these men and this is very real. What underlies
      this problem is our unacceptance of homosexuality." Rosalind
      Andrews-Worthy, executive director of Detroit-based Gospel Against AIDS,
      agreed, saying, "The stigma we have put on homosexuality is causing people
      to make the decisions they are making. It's devastating African-American
      men. These men are living a suppressed life." Andrews-Worthy added, "We
      have to start embracing everyone. Until we do, we will have men who have
      sex with men and go back to women." Phill Wilson, executive director of
      the Black AIDS Institute, said that in order to combat the problem, black
      women must stop "knowingly sharing" men, educate themselves about how to
      prevent HIV infection and build their self-esteem, according to the News
      (Hayes Taylor, Detroit News, 6/27).

      5. Philadelphia Inquirer Examines Increase in Number of HIV/AIDS Cases
      Among Women

      Access this story and related links online:
      http://www.kaisernetwork.org/daily_reports/rep_index.cfm?DR_ID=18565

      The Philadelphia Inquirer yesterday examined the nationwide increase in
      the number of HIV/AIDS cases among women, noting that black and Hispanic
      women have been particularly hard hit by the disease. Many of the women do
      not engage in traditional high-risk behaviors, such as having multiple sex
      partners and injecting drugs, but instead contract HIV through heterosexual
      sex without a condom and often with men who also have sex with men. In
      2001, about 30% of Philadelphia's new HIV/AIDS cases were among women,
      compared with 12% in 1990. The trend, which is occuring nationwide,
      presents a challenge to public health workers, who are trying to develop
      outreach and education strategies to reach women. However, women without
      obvious risk factors for HIV/AIDS tend to delay testing and are difficult
      to reach because they do not have well-defined hangouts and habits,
      according to the Inquirer. Prevention workers in the city plan to begin a
      federal pilot project later this year in which they will go into
      neighborhoods to talk to people about the disease. "We'll probably hang
      out on certain street corners and ask people to sit down for an interview
      in the neighborhood pizza parlor or doughnut shop," Kathleen Brady, an HIV
      epidemiologist for the Philadelphia Department of Public Health, said. "We
      reimburse them for their time. We're trying to reach high-risk
      heterosexuals to define who they are and where to find them," Brady added
      (McCullough, Philadelphia Inquirer, 6/30).

      SCIENCE & MEDICINE


      6. Irish Researcher Identifies Previously Undiscovered Strain of HIV

      Access this story and related links online:
      http://www.kaisernetwork.org/daily_reports/rep_index.cfm?DR_ID=18566

      An Irish researcher has uncovered a previously unknown strain of HIV that
      could aid in the development of an HIV vaccine, Reuters/Fort Lauderdale
      Sun-Sentinel reports. The findings were published in the International
      Retrovirology Association's journal AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
      and were made public yesterday by the National University of
      Ireland-Maynooth (Reuters/Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel, 6/30). Dr. Grace
      McCormack of the university's biology department found the strain in blood
      samples from Malawi during research on the molecular evolution of HIV
      (Holland, Irish Times, 6/30). Some of the samples in McCormack's study,
      which she has been working on for three years, are from the early 1980s
      when the AIDS epidemic was first recognized, according to
      Reuters/Sun-Sentinel. McCormack said, "It is very interesting because
      while we have found people infected with it in the 1980s, we haven't found
      any examples of it in the 1990s yet." She added, "As a result, it might be
      a strain of the virus that has failed. Because of that it may give us
      information on how to defeat the virus." Researchers said that they hope
      the findings could lead to new prevention and control tools to fight
      HIV/AIDS, including an HIV vaccine, Reuters/Sun-Sentinel reports.
      McCormack said that she has applied for additional funding and hopes to
      finish her research within the next three years (Reuters/Fort Lauderdale
      Sun-Sentinel, 6/30).

      OPINION


      7. Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report Summarizes Editorials on Bush's Upcoming
      Trip to Africa

      Access this story and related links online:
      http://www.kaisernetwork.org/daily_reports/rep_index.cfm?DR_ID=18567

      Several newspapers have recently featured editorials discussing Bush's
      global AIDS initiative and his upcoming trip to Africa. Bush is scheduled
      to visit five African nations -- Senegal, South Africa, Botswana, Uganda
      and Nigeria -- from July 7 to July 12 to promote economic development and
      the fight against HIV/AIDS. During the trip, Bush is expected to discuss
      several initiatives that focus on Africa, including the five-year, $15
      billion AIDS initiative (HR 1298), which he signed into law in May, and the
      Millennium Challenge Account, which calls for increasing aid to developing
      countries in exchange for a range of political and economic reforms (Kaiser
      Daily HIV/AIDS Report, 6/27). Summaries of the editorials are as follows:

      * Toronto Globe and Mail: According to some AIDS advocates, Bush's trip to
      Africa is a "premature victory lap" celebrating the passage of his global
      AIDS initiative, a Globe and Mail editorial says. The amount of money
      allocated to the initiative is "nothing to be proud of" in the fight
      against "diseases that are laying waste to parts of Africa, and areas
      beyond," the editorial says. The Globe and Mail concludes that Bush was
      right in his insistence that the international community build its policies
      in Africa based on a moral duty to stop suffering, but "he should follow
      through on his commitments and other nations ... should do more too" (Globe
      and Mail, 6/30).

      * Long Island Newsday: Bush is "using his international bully pulpit to
      focus needed attention on Africa" to draw attention to the continent's
      "grievous crises [of] ... ferocious civil wars, pervasive official
      corruption and the scourge of AIDS, malaria and famine," a Newsday
      editorial says. While Bush's "ambitious agenda" seems to lack the
      necessary "money or muscle" to back it up, the international attention that
      this plan will garner is "not a bad thing," the editorial concludes (Long
      Island Newsday, 6/30).

      * New York Times: While Africa's problems may "seem remote to some
      Americans, Mr. Bush recognizes that they are not," and his trip to Africa,
      promises of increased aid to the region and the global AIDS initiative
      "symboliz[e] that concern," a Times editorial says. The AIDS initiative is
      especially "welcome" because it can "save hundreds of thousands of lives"
      and is also "remarkably cost effective," compared with the costs of war or
      farm subsidies, the editorial concludes (New York Times, 6/28).

      * Salt Lake Tribune: If Bush's trip to Africa and commitment of funding
      for the global AIDS initiative is "truly a new American commitment to
      dealing with Africa, then it is good news indeed," a Tribune editorial
      says. "It is a hopeful sign indeed that the president ... seems to realize
      that the problems of Africa impose upon America both the moral duty and the
      security necessity to do all we can, with long-term, committed policies, to
      help that sad continent overcome its ... burdens and rise to full
      membership in the family of nations," the editorial concludes (Salt Lake
      Tribune, 6/30).

      ________________________________________

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    • kaisernetwork
      KAISER DAILY HIV/AIDS REPORT A service of kaisernetwork.org http://www.kaisernetwork.org/dailyreports/hiv ________________________________________ Monday,
      Message 275 of 275 , Feb 9, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        KAISER DAILY HIV/AIDS REPORT
        A service of kaisernetwork.org
        http://www.kaisernetwork.org/dailyreports/hiv
        ________________________________________


        Monday, February 9, 2004

        POLITICS AND POLICY
        ========================================
        1. Wilmington, Del., City Council Adopts Measure Supporting Bill
        That Would Create Pilot Needle-Exchange Program

        ACROSS THE NATION
        ========================================
        2. Illinois, New York Attorneys General Launch Investigations
        Into Abbott's Price Increase of AIDS Drug

        PUBLIC HEALTH & EDUCATION
        ========================================
        3. New York City Schools To Revise HIV/AIDS, Sex Education
        Curricula

        4. Newspapers Cover Local Events, AIDS Awareness Efforts on
        National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

        GLOBAL CHALLENGES
        ========================================
        5. Wealthy Nations Must Stop 'Decade of Financial Abstinence,'
        Increase International AIDS Spending, U.N. Envoy Lewis Says

        DRUG ACCESS
        ========================================
        6. Indiana University Program Receives $1.6M Federal Grant To
        Provide Treatment, Care to HIV-Positive Kenyans

        7. Los Angeles Times Examines Growing Concern Over Counterfeit
        Drugs, Including Some HIV/AIDS Medications

        HEALTH ON THE HILL FROM KAISERNETWORK.ORG AND CQ
        ========================================
        8. CQ's Schuler Discusses Bush FY 2005 Budget Proposal,
        Including AIDS Funding

        ****************************************

        POLITICS AND POLICY

        1. Wilmington, Del., City Council Adopts Measure Supporting Bill
        That Would Create Pilot Needle-Exchange Program

        Access this story and related links online:
        http://cme.kff.org/Key=1852.Cbg.C.D.6yRD1

        The Wilmington, Del., City Council on Thursday adopted 12-1 a
        resolution supporting a state Senate bill (SB 209) that would
        create a pilot needle-exchange program in Delaware, the
        Wilmington News Journal reports. The bill, which state Sen.
        Margaret Rose Henry (D) introduced last week in the General
        Assembly, would establish a five-year pilot program in which
        state health workers would distribute clean needles to drug
        users from a van in several locations throughout Wilmington.
        Henry has tried since the mid-1990s to pass a measure to allow a
        needle-exchange program, which would cost the state about
        $175,000 per year, according to the News Journal. Opponents of
        the program say that a needle-exchange program would condone
        drug use in the city, which they say already is a "hot spot" for
        injection drug use, the News Journal reports. Wilmington Police
        Chief Michael Szczerba said, "People say these programs get
        dirty needles off the street, but what it boils down to is
        putting clean needles into the hands of drug addicts so they can
        continue their illegal and dangerous activities." He added, "We
        need to strengthen, not weaken, drug laws. And we shouldn't send
        contradictory and harmful messages to our children." However,
        Wilmington Mayor James Baker (D) said that he supports a
        needle-exchange program because it would help the city reach its
        Health Wilmington 2010 goal of reducing HIV prevalence by 20%
        over the next six years. "We've got to do something," Baker
        said, adding, "We've got an epidemic on our hands, and so far
        just wringing our hands about it hasn't helped." The state
        Senate Health and Social Service Committee next will debate the
        bill (Taylor, Wilmington News Journal, 2/6).

        ACROSS THE NATION

        2. Illinois, New York Attorneys General Launch Investigations
        Into Abbott's Price Increase of AIDS Drug

        Access this story and related links online:
        http://cme.kff.org/Key=1852.Cbg.D.D.0nGgv

        Attorneys general for Illinois and New York have begun
        investigations into whether Chicago-based Abbott Laboratories
        violated antitrust laws when it increased by 400% the price of
        its antiretroviral drug Norvir, the Chicago Tribune reports
        (Japsen, Chicago Tribune, 2/8). In December, Abbott increased
        the wholesale price of Norvir -- which is known generically as
        ritonavir -- from $54 per month to $265 per month. Norvir is
        primarily used as a booster for other protease inhibitors, such
        as Bristol-Myers Squibb's Reyataz and Merck's Crixivan (Kaiser
        Daily HIV/AIDS Report, 1/30). On Friday, Illinois Attorney
        General Lisa Madigan (D) announced that her office has opened an
        investigation into whether the price increase of Norvir was
        designed to make antiretroviral drug combinations that use
        Norvir as a booster more expensive, steering patients toward
        Abbott's newer antiretroviral drug Kaletra. Kaletra, which does
        not need a booster for other protease inhibitors because it
        includes Norvir, costs about $18.78 per day, or $563.40 per
        month, and has a longer patent life, the Tribune reports.

        Reaction

        "Norvir is not like a hay fever medication that people take to
        lessen symptoms to be more comfortable," Madigan said, adding,
        "It is a drug they take to survive. This investigation is aimed
        at determining the real reason for the price increase and
        whether it violates Illinois law." Abbott officials said that
        the company "denies any wrongdoing" and will "vigorously defend
        its pricing" of Norvir because a price increase for the drug was
        "long overdue after years of being priced well below rivals,"
        the Tribune reports. "Many companies have known the value of
        Norvir to their drugs and priced their drugs at a premium
        despite this," Abbott spokesperson Melissa Brotz said. She
        added, "Competitors need to price their drugs based on their
        clinical value. Perhaps those concerned about the cost of
        therapy should look at the highest cost component of HIV
        regimens." Abbott officials also said that the company is
        "committed to ensuring that every patient has unrestricted
        access to" Norvir and has frozen the price of Norvir for
        government health insurers, community clinics and drug
        assistance programs. According to Illinois state prosecutors,
        about 40% of HIV-positive people who take Norvir are covered by
        private medical insurance and another 2% to 5% of people pay out
        of pocket. Madigan said, "Every consumer is affected by unfair
        or deceptive practices that drive up the cost of drugs." The
        investigation by New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer (D),
        which was confirmed by Abbott, also concerns whether the Norvir
        price increase was made in order to drive market share toward
        Kaletra. A spokesperson for Spitzer's office would not confirm
        or deny the investigation. However, officials for Abbott said
        that they were cooperating with and supplying information to the
        New York attorney general's antitrust bureau (Chicago Tribune,
        2/8).

        Editorial

        With its price increase of Norvir, Abbott is "playing by the
        rules, or lack of them," a Fresno Bee editorial states. To
        combat the "contemptible" price increase, consumers must "play
        just as tough in this market as" the drug companies, but that
        will "require the federal government to be more than a passive
        player in this game," the Bee contends. The editorial concludes
        that until President Bush changes his stance from what the drug
        industry wants, which is "to reduce the role of government in
        protecting the consumer," consumers will have to "pay up or go
        without" (Fresno Bee, 2/6).

        PUBLIC HEALTH & EDUCATION

        3. New York City Schools To Revise HIV/AIDS, Sex Education
        Curricula

        Access this story and related links online:
        http://cme.kff.org/Key=1852.Cbg.F.D.4N8w0

        New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's (R) administration on
        Thursday announced that city schools will revise their
        "outdated" HIV/AIDS and sex education curricula and likely begin
        teaching the subjects to students earlier than eighth grade, the
        New York Post reports. New York City schools currently teach sex
        education in eighth and 11th grades, according to the Post
        (Campanile, New York Post, 2/6). Dr. Roger Platt, director of
        the Office of School Health, said that the city schools' sex
        education curriculum has not been updated for 20 years and the
        AIDS curriculum has not been updated in 10 years (Yan, Long
        Island Newsday, 2/6). According to Planned Parenthood of New
        York City, the sex education curriculum still lists the Today
        Sponge as a contraceptive option even though the product has not
        been available since 1994. In addition, the AIDS curriculum
        states that gay, white men account for the "overwhelming
        majority" of AIDS cases, despite the fact that blacks and
        Latinos account for 82% of new HIV/AIDS cases among teenagers,
        the Post reports.

        Reaction

        Schools Chancellor Joel Klein said that in addition to the
        "inadequate" curricula, there is a shortage of high school
        health teachers and they do not have time to attend the required
        30 hours of training to teach the subjects (New York Post, 2/6).
        "It's pretty hard to justify to people to invest 30 hours of
        their time to learn a 20-year-old curriculum," Platt said,
        according to Newsday (Long Island Newsday, 2/6). Platt said that
        the new HIV/AIDS curriculum and information on preventing
        pregnancy will be based on "sound advice" from health
        professionals and education experts, according to the Post (New
        York Post, 2/6). Education officials said that the health
        curriculum could be complete by the end of the year, but they
        have not yet set a timeline for the new HIV/AIDS curriculum,
        which is a "more complicated process" because public comment is
        required, Newsday reports.

        Health Education Mandates

        The state Education Department requires schools to give general
        health and age-appropriate HIV/AIDS instruction in every grade,
        but the requirement is being met "unevenly at best," according
        to Newsday (Long Island Newsday, 2/6). According to state
        Assembly member Scott Stringer (D), who wrote a report titled
        "Failing Grade: Health Education in New York City Schools," at
        least 75% of schools in the city violate government health
        education requirements, according to the New York Sun. Platt
        said that in 2002, almost 10,000 city women younger than 18
        became pregnant and 3,000 became mothers, according to the Sun.
        In addition, teens represented 114 new HIV cases in the city
        (Lucadamo, New York Sun, 2/6). Last month, the New York AIDS
        Coalition released a report stating that New York City schools
        have violated state mandates on HIV/AIDS education. The report,
        titled "A Call for Reform: Strengthening HIV/AIDS Education in
        New York City's Public Schools," found that the schools have
        failed to meet guidelines requiring students in sixth through
        12th grades to receive six HIV/AIDS lessons per year and
        guidelines requiring students in kindergarten through fifth
        grade to receive five AIDS-related lessons per year. The report
        recommends that the school system update its HIV/AIDS lessons,
        employ well-trained personnel to teach the lessons and improve
        oversight and evaluation procedures to better ensure compliance.
        "Examining the stipulations of the mandate one by one reveals
        that the school system is not in full compliance," the report
        said, adding, "These grave inadequacies exist in the face of
        increasing HIV infections among youth" (Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS
        Report, 1/9).

        4. Newspapers Cover Local Events, AIDS Awareness Efforts on
        National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

        Access this story and related links online:
        http://cme.kff.org/Key=1852.Cbg.G.D.4l0BD

        Saturday marked the fourth annual National Black HIV/AIDS
        Awareness Day, which is sponsored by the Community Capacity
        Building Coalition, a consortium of national minority-focused
        groups supported by CDC through the National Minority AIDS
        Initiative. The CCBC includes: Concerned Black Men, the Health
        Watch Information and Promotion Service, the Jackson State
        University-Mississippi Urban Research Center, the National Black
        Alcoholism and Addictions Council and the National Black
        Leadership Commission on AIDS (National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness
        Day Web site, 2/8). The goal of National Black HIV/AIDS
        Awareness Day is to urge African Americans to "get educated, get
        tested and get involved" with HIV/AIDS in black communities
        (NBHAAD release, 1/20). Although African Americans represent
        about 12% of the U.S. population, more than 50% of all AIDS
        cases diagnosed in 2002 were among African Americans. HHS
        Secretary Tommy Thompson in a statement said that National Black
        HIV/AIDS Awareness Day "serves as a springboard for action
        against the devastating effects HIV/AIDS continues to have on
        the African-American community" and "is an important opportunity
        to understand and educate people nationwide about mobilizing in
        the fight against HIV/AIDS." Thompson added, "Together, we can
        make a difference" (HHS release, 2/6).

        Newspaper Coverage

        Newspapers around the country covered events taking place in
        honor of National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. Links to some of
        the articles published appear below:

        * AP/Charlotte Observer, "Health workers take aim at AIDS: In
        N.C. towns, focus is on stemming disease among minorities"
        (Holmes, AP/Charlotte Observer, 2/8).

        * Atlanta Journal-Constitution, "Groups share facts about
        blacks, AIDS" (Guthrie, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 2/7).

        * Austin American-Statesman, "Offer of free HIV testing draws
        few takers" (Brulliard, Austin American-Statesman, 2/8).

        * Cincinnati Enquirer, "Volunteers warn African Americans about
        AIDS threat" (Leingang, Cincinnati Enquirer, 2/8).

        * Daytona Beach News-Journal, "Groups to promote AIDS awareness"
        (Weiss, Daytona Beach News-Journal, 2/6).

        * Houston Chronicle, "Pop group brings message on HIV's
        prevalence" (Lezon, Houston Chronicle, 2/7).

        * New Orleans Times-Picayune, "AIDS program geared to African
        Americans" (Kaplinsky, New Orleans Times-Picayune, 2/8).

        * Omaha World-Herald, "Advocates say AIDS takes toll on blacks"
        (Grace, Omaha World-Herald, 2/7).

        * South Florida Sun-Sentinel, "HIV group stresses dangers for
        blacks" (LaMendola, South Florida Sun-Sentinel, 2/7).

        Media Coverage

        The following broadcast programs reported on National Black
        HIV/AIDS Awareness Day:

        * CNN's "Live Sunday": The segment includes comments from former
        Surgeon General David Satcher (Whitfield, "Live Sunday," CNN,
        2/8). The complete transcript is available online.

        * CNN's "Saturday Night": The segment includes comments from
        Debra Fraser-Howze, president and CEO of the National Black
        Leadership Commission on AIDS; Zachary Jones, a bishop with the
        Unity Fellowship Church Movement; J.L. King, author of the book
        "No More Secrets, No More Lies"; and AIDS advocates Maria Davis
        and Michael Saunders (Udoji, "Saturday Night," CNN, 2/7). The
        complete transcript is available online.

        * NPR's "Tavis Smiley Show": The segment includes comments from
        Jacob Levenson, author of the book "The Secret Epidemic: The
        Story of AIDS and Black America," and Dr. Mindy Fullilove, a
        psychiatrist whose work is featured in the book (Smiley, "Tavis
        Smiley Show," NPR, 2/6). The complete segment is available
        online in RealPlayer.

        GLOBAL CHALLENGES

        5. Wealthy Nations Must Stop 'Decade of Financial Abstinence,'
        Increase International AIDS Spending, U.N. Envoy Lewis Says

        Access this story and related links online:
        http://cme.kff.org/Key=1852.Cbg.H.D.v6Fg

        U.N. Special Envoy for HIV/AIDS in Africa Stephen Lewis on
        Sunday at the opening of the 11th Conference on Retroviruses and
        Opportunistic Infections in San Francisco said that wealthy
        nations must contribute more money to the international fight
        against HIV/AIDS to make up for a "decade of financial
        abstinence," the San Francisco Chronicle reports. No country is
        "paying an adequate share" of money to finance the Global Fund
        to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, Lewis said, adding that
        the fund needs $3.6 billion for 2005. The "fair share" for the
        United States would be $1.6 billion in 2005, Lewis said,
        according to the Chronicle (Russell, San Francisco Chronicle,
        2/9). However, President Bush in his proposed fiscal year 2005
        budget requests $200 million for the Global Fund. Congress
        appropriated $550 million for the fund in FY 2004 (Kaiser Daily
        HIV/AIDS Report, 1/29). Lewis said that although Bush has
        pledged $15 billion over five years to fight HIV/AIDS, most of
        the funding will go directly to programs in 12 African
        countries. However, programs such as the Global Fund are needed
        to address the epidemic in countries that are not included on
        the U.S. list, Lewis said. Lewis also highlighted the World
        Health Organization's goal of bringing antiretroviral drug
        treatment to three million people by 2005, calling it the
        "single most important and dramatic development that has
        happened in years" (San Francisco Chronicle, 2/9). WHO's $5.5
        billion plan calls for training 100,000 health care workers,
        refocusing 10,000 clinics in developing countries to treat
        HIV/AIDS and using some common antiretroviral drug combinations.
        However, the plan does not provide the drugs or subsidize their
        cost (Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, 1/21). Lewis said that an
        additional $200 million in funding is needed from developed
        countries to "get [the program] under way" this year, according
        to the Chronicle (San Francisco Chronicle, 2/9).

        DRUG ACCESS

        6. Indiana University Program Receives $1.6M Federal Grant To
        Provide Treatment, Care to HIV-Positive Kenyans

        Access this story and related links online:
        http://cme.kff.org/Key=1852.Cbg.J.D.LttJn

        A program established 14 years ago by Indiana University
        physicians to fight HIV/AIDS in Kenya has received a $1.6
        million grant from USAID that will allow the program to provide
        treatment to about 15,000 HIV-positive Kenyans, the
        AP/Indianapolis Star reports (AP/Indianapolis Star, 2/5). Sen.
        Richard Lugar (R-Ind.), chair of the Senate Foreign Relations
        Committee, made the announcement on Thursday (Indiana University
        School of Medicine release, 2/5). Over the past two years,
        doctors from the Indiana University School of Medicine, the Moi
        Teaching and Referral Hospital and the Moi University Faculty of
        Health Sciences have treated about 2,000 HIV-positive adults and
        children in Kenya through the Academic Model for the Prevention
        and Treatment for HIV/AIDS, or AMPATH program. Until now, the
        program has been financed largely by private donations, but the
        federal grant will allow a nearly eight-fold increase in the
        program's caseload, according to the AP/Star. With the new
        money, the doctors over the next five years plan to establish
        HIV prevention and treatment programs in two additional rural
        communities in Kenya. AMPATH Director Dr. Robert Einterz said
        that the "tireless efforts" of IU physicians and "years of
        support" from many private donors in Indiana have contributed to
        the success of the program. Since 1990, more than 600 IU
        students, residents and faculty members have worked in Kenya to
        care for HIV/AIDS patients, according to IU spokesperson Pamela
        Perry. The AMPATH program also operates a program that has
        trained more than 90 traditional birth attendants to care for
        HIV-positive pregnant women to help them reduce the risk of
        mother-to-child HIV transmission. In addition, the program
        provides AIDS education to community support groups and runs a
        10-acre farm to provide "high quality nutrition" to HIV-positive
        families, according to the AP/Star (AP/Indianapolis Star, 2/5).

        7. Los Angeles Times Examines Growing Concern Over Counterfeit
        Drugs, Including Some HIV/AIDS Medications

        Access this story and related links online:
        http://cme.kff.org/Key=1852.Cbg.K.D.GvG8X

        The Los Angeles Times on Monday examined the growing problem of
        counterfeit prescription drugs, including some medications used
        to treat people living with HIV/AIDS. Although the FDA says that
        the U.S. pharmaceutical supply is the "safest in the world,"
        recent seizures of counterfeit drugs raise concerns that
        consumers no longer can be certain that the drugs they receive
        are genuine and safe, the Times reports. One of the drugs
        counterfeiters have targeted is Serostim, which some
        HIV-positive people take to treat wasting, according to the
        Times. A 12-week course of Serostim costs approximately $21,000,
        and the labels and packaging needed to counterfeit the drug can
        be purchased over the Internet. In addition, officials in
        California in 2001 discovered a counterfeit shipment of the
        growth hormone Neupogen -- which is prescribed to some HIV/AIDS
        patients -- with drug bottles filled with salt water rather than
        medicine. Counterfeiting has increased with the emergence of
        more "unscrupulous" secondary drug wholesalers, according to the
        Times. Some HIV/AIDS clinics, which receive discounts on drugs,
        buy more drugs than they need and sell the remainder to
        wholesalers at a profit, according to the Times. With more
        secondary wholesalers in the market, it can be more difficult to
        trace the original source of drugs, the Times reports. To fight
        counterfeiting, Serostim's manufacturer, Swiss-based Serono, has
        stopped using wholesalers, authorizes only 100 pharmacies in the
        United States to sell the drug and tracks every shipment of the
        drug until it reaches a buyer, according to the Times (Jaret,
        Los Angeles Times, 2/9).

        HEALTH ON THE HILL FROM KAISERNETWORK.ORG AND CQ

        8. CQ's Schuler Discusses Bush FY 2005 Budget Proposal,
        Including AIDS Funding

        Access this story and related links online:
        http://cme.kff.org/Key=1852.Cbg.L.D.WCk2l

        Congressional Quarterly's Kate Schuler in this week's "Health
        on the Hill from kaisernetwork.org and CQ" discusses President
        Bush's fiscal year 2005 budget proposal released last week,
        including an increase in funding for international and domestic
        HIV/AIDS programs, which some critics say is "still not enough."
        The proposal includes $2.7 billion for international AIDS
        programs, which is an increase from FY 2004 spending but does
        not match the $3 billion authorized by Congress. According to
        Schuler, critics have said that the initiative is "moving too
        slowly," but Randall Tobias, head of the State Department's
        Office of the Global AIDS Coordinator, said that the
        administration is "laying a foundation" for the program. Randall
        added that the full pledge of $15 billion over five years for
        the global AIDS initiative will be met. According to Schuler,
        Bush expects that by 2008 the initiative will have "prevented
        millions of new infections and treated and cared for millions"
        of HIV-positive people (Schuler, "Health on the Hill from
        kaisernetwork.org and CQ," 2/9).

        The report will be available online after noon on Monday.

        ________________________________________

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