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Re: Comcast coming to install HD...

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  • Eugene Chan
    I m not biased toward one or the other. I have some components that only have one or the other, so it s not like I could just choose one anyway. I think
    Message 1 of 14 , Jan 2, 2004
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      I'm not biased toward one or the other. I have some components that only have one
      or the other, so it's not like I could just choose one anyway. I think
      academically coax will suffer more from attenuation and such, but in practically all
      cases, you wouldn't notice the effects. Sound quality should not be an issue.

      So in choosing one over the other, I'd say the most important issues are what kind of
      hardware you have, and if they have outstanding issues with either interface, price,
      and if you care about cable flex. Most of the higher-quality coaxial cable uses a solid
      18 gauge center conductor. Kink the cable more than 90 degrees or flex it repeatedly
      in one area and it will shear. That also deforms the dielectric layer, which effects its
      shielding properties.

      I use coax where possible because it's cheaper for me to buy, or make myself.

      --- In HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com, "ET" <fflyer35@y...> wrote:
      > This is a subject of great debate. Some really picky people insist that coaxial digital
      connections sound better in direct head-to-head comparisons. But the trend among
      AVR and DVD player manufacturers is toward optical, especially as home theater
      components get smaller (TOSlink connectors are physically smaller and probably
      require less space inside). For example, my JVC DVD player and Sony AV receiver
      support only optical connections (both are low-profile). When laptops start
      supporting digital audio outputs, I'm sure they'll go with optical. I prefer optical
      because the cables are less bulky, but I think both types of connectors sound great
      and don't think most consumers will be able to tell the difference.
    • Chris Rempel
      ... Actually most higher quality coaxial cable has a stranded center conductor, but this not compatible with the cheap F connectors that are used. You have
      Message 2 of 14 , Jan 2, 2004
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        Eugene Chan wrote:

        > Most of the higher-quality coaxial cable uses a solid
        > 18 gauge center conductor. Kink the cable more than 90 degrees or flex it repeatedly
        > in one area and it will shear. That also deforms the dielectric layer, which effects its
        > shielding properties.
        >

        Actually most higher quality coaxial cable has a stranded center conductor, but this not
        compatible with the cheap "F" connectors that are used. You have to use a more commercial or
        industrial connector like a BNC or for larger cables an "N" This then gives you more flex.
        If you go to a really large cable, more than 1/2", then they go back to solid, because you
        can't flex a big cable very much anyway. That's why you see on commercial video equipment
        they use BNC connectors.

        Chris aka the antenna doctor
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