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FCC Broadcast TV Spectrum Reallocation Plans

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  • Link
    The FCC s spectrum reallocation plan envisions broadcasters surrendering channels 31-51, to be used by cell phone companies. By my count, that would require at
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 25, 2011
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      The FCC's spectrum reallocation plan envisions broadcasters surrendering channels 31-51, to be used by cell phone companies. By my count, that would require at least 12 Bay Area stations to move to lower frequencies. Assuming that channels 2-6 are unsuitable, that leaves 24 slots, 8 of which are already occupied. Fitting 12 channels into the 16 remaining slots while accounting for same and adjacent channel interference from other markets (SAC, Monterey) seems impossible.

      http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9218630/Spectrum_plan_could_shut_down_TV_stations_says_trade_group?taxonomyId=16

      A lot of this seems to be driven by sending video over the cell phone frequencies, which is just a crazy use of limited bandwidth, since it's one to one, instead of one to all, like broadcast TV.

      Link
    • Richard Tidd
      What happened to the freed up VHF channels? I thought that the FCC originally wanted to sell all the old TV VHF band but since stations could continue to
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 25, 2011
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        What happened to the freed up VHF channels?

        I thought that the FCC originally wanted to sell all the old TV VHF band but since stations could continue to broadcast digital in the VHF band, that spectrom is not there as a whole?
         

        _________
        Thank You
        Richard Tidd
        richtidd1@...



        From: Link <link.perry@...>
        To: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Mon, July 25, 2011 5:35:49 PM
        Subject: [HDTV-in-SFbay] FCC Broadcast TV Spectrum Reallocation Plans

         

        The FCC's spectrum reallocation plan envisions broadcasters surrendering channels 31-51, to be used by cell phone companies. By my count, that would require at least 12 Bay Area stations to move to lower frequencies. Assuming that channels 2-6 are unsuitable, that leaves 24 slots, 8 of which are already occupied. Fitting 12 channels into the 16 remaining slots while accounting for same and adjacent channel interference from other markets (SAC, Monterey) seems impossible.

        http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9218630/Spectrum_plan_could_shut_down_TV_stations_says_trade_group?taxonomyId=16

        A lot of this seems to be driven by sending video over the cell phone frequencies, which is just a crazy use of limited bandwidth, since it's one to one, instead of one to all, like broadcast TV.

        Link

      • Link Perry
        At the digital transition, UHF channels 52-69 were surrendered. The VHF spectrum is still all for broadcast TV. No VHF channels were freed up. Link
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 25, 2011
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          At the digital transition, UHF channels 52-69 were surrendered.  The VHF spectrum is still all for broadcast TV. No VHF channels were freed up.

          Link

          On Mon, Jul 25, 2011 at 6:20 PM, Richard Tidd <richtidd1@...> wrote:


          What happened to the freed up VHF channels?

          I thought that the FCC originally wanted to sell all the old TV VHF band but since stations could continue to broadcast digital in the VHF band, that spectrom is not there as a whole?
           

          _________
          Thank You
          Richard Tidd
          richtidd1@...



          From: Link <link.perry@...>
          To: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Mon, July 25, 2011 5:35:49 PM
          Subject: [HDTV-in-SFbay] FCC Broadcast TV Spectrum Reallocation Plans

           

          The FCC's spectrum reallocation plan envisions broadcasters surrendering channels 31-51, to be used by cell phone companies. By my count, that would require at least 12 Bay Area stations to move to lower frequencies. Assuming that channels 2-6 are unsuitable, that leaves 24 slots, 8 of which are already occupied. Fitting 12 channels into the 16 remaining slots while accounting for same and adjacent channel interference from other markets (SAC, Monterey) seems impossible.

          http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9218630/Spectrum_plan_could_shut_down_TV_stations_says_trade_group?taxonomyId=16

          A lot of this seems to be driven by sending video over the cell phone frequencies, which is just a crazy use of limited bandwidth, since it's one to one, instead of one to all, like broadcast TV.

          Link




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