Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Tired of wrecked antennas falling over on the roof

Expand Messages
  • Jason
    Since it is difficult for me to get signals from Mt. Bruno, my antenna is raised quite high, about 15ft above my roof. We ve had some fairly strong winds this
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 21, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Since it is difficult for me to get signals from Mt. Bruno, my antenna is raised quite high, about 15ft above my roof. We've had some fairly strong winds this past year, but nothing out of the ordinary. However, I'm on my third antenna.

      I've built a stand for the mast. Its a cross of 2x8 boards, about 5" across on both arms. From each arm, I have 2x2 beams that going up towards the center to create a pyramid which meet at a bracket for the mast. The mast comes down through that bracket and slips into a similar bracket at the base.

      It looks something like this: http://www.tvantenna.com/products/tvreception/mounting/non-penetrating/NPRM-2.html

      My contraption is quite heavy, but it doesn't stop my antenna from smashing into the roof. I swear, a sparse antenna could catch enough wind to bring Larry Ellison's Spirit of America to an easy America's Cup victory. I should've taken pictures of these demolished antennae before recycling them.

      At any rate, I've been resisting using guy wires because I'm afriad of leaks. And, I really believe these winds would pull the wires right out. For the same reason I do not want to put on of those side/gable mounts. A friend suggested using sandbags on the arms of my contraption. Say its already about 60 lbs and I put another 100lbs of sand (total) on the ends of the arms. That's 160lbs (or more) in a 5'x5' spot on my roof.

      Is this a bad idea? Are there better solutions out there?

      Die Comcast, die.

      jason
    • weinstro
      Hi, I would consider the item you linked to be OK for a temporary install. For something permanent, you need to consider a guy wires, or tripod plus guy wires.
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 22, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi,

        I would consider the item you linked to be OK for a temporary install. For something permanent, you need to consider a guy wires, or tripod plus guy wires.

        If you're unwilling to mount to the roof, you could also consider a tower, but that starts to run into major $$$$.

        There's a very nice antenna install guide available for download at http:www.solidsignal.com. If you have time, give it a read.

        Regards,

        Rob
      • Link Perry
        There are also some mast guying recommendations here: http://www.dslreports.com/faq/7151 The writer insists that the eye hooks must be installed into rafters,
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 22, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          There are also some mast guying recommendations here: http://www.dslreports.com/faq/7151

          The writer insists that the eye hooks must be installed into rafters, not just the roof deck. Although I'm not sure how easy this is on a completed roof, even with a stud finder.

          Link

          On Wed, Jul 21, 2010 at 12:47 PM, Jason <jasongabler@...> wrote:
          Since it is difficult for me to get signals from Mt. Bruno, my antenna is raised quite high, about 15ft above my roof.  We've had some fairly strong winds this past year, but nothing out of the ordinary.  However, I'm on my third antenna.

          I've built a stand for the mast.  Its a cross of 2x8 boards, about 5" across on both arms.  From each arm, I have 2x2 beams that going up towards the center to create a pyramid which meet at a bracket for the mast.  The mast comes down through that bracket and slips into a similar bracket at the base.

          It looks something like this:  http://www.tvantenna.com/products/tvreception/mounting/non-penetrating/NPRM-2.html

          My contraption is quite heavy, but it doesn't stop my antenna from smashing into the roof.  I swear, a sparse antenna could catch enough wind to bring Larry Ellison's Spirit of America to an easy America's Cup victory.  I should've taken pictures of these demolished antennae before recycling them.

          At any rate, I've been resisting using guy wires because I'm afriad of leaks.  And, I really believe these winds would pull the wires right out.  For the same reason I do not want to put on of those side/gable mounts.   A friend suggested using sandbags on the arms of my contraption.  Say its already about 60 lbs and I put another 100lbs of sand (total) on the ends of the arms.  That's 160lbs (or more) in a 5'x5' spot on my roof.

          Is this a bad idea?  Are there better solutions out there?

          Die Comcast, die.

          jason



          ------------------------------------

          Yahoo! Groups Links

          <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
             http://groups.yahoo.com/group/HDTV-in-SFbay/

          <*> Your email settings:
             Individual Email | Traditional

          <*> To change settings online go to:
             http://groups.yahoo.com/group/HDTV-in-SFbay/join
             (Yahoo! ID required)

          <*> To change settings via email:
             HDTV-in-SFbay-digest@yahoogroups.com
             HDTV-in-SFbay-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

          <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
             HDTV-in-SFbay-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

          <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
             http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


        • Otto
          Using guy wires is your best bet. I ve had an antenna on my roof for over 20+ years sitting on top of a 15 mast. It is attached to the roof with a small clamp
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 22, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Using guy wires is your best bet. I've had an antenna on my roof for over 20+ years sitting on top of a 15' mast. It is attached to the roof with a small clamp (not a tripod) and secured with 3 guy wires with their eye hooks screwed into the rafters. I even had to remove the antenna when we had a metal roof installed and the eye hooks were re-attached thru the metal roof to the rafters underneath. Any competent antenna installer should be able to do that. Our's was re-installed by the Antenna Doctor but I'm not sure if they're still in business after the owner's passing away a few years back. The antenna has withstood 20+ years of wind, rain, heat, and icy conditions without any trouble (never had to replace it), and we have always been able to get all that Sutro and San Bruno have to offer. I do have a rotor installed as well but rarely have to use it. Never had a leak either. HTH.

            Scott

            --- In HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com, Link Perry <link.perry@...> wrote:
            >
            > There are also some mast guying recommendations here:
            > http://www.dslreports.com/faq/7151
            >
            > The writer insists that the eye hooks must be installed into rafters, not
            > just the roof deck. Although I'm not sure how easy this is on a completed
            > roof, even with a stud finder.
            >
            > Link
            >
            > On Wed, Jul 21, 2010 at 12:47 PM, Jason <jasongabler@...> wrote:
            >
            > > Since it is difficult for me to get signals from Mt. Bruno, my antenna is
            > > raised quite high, about 15ft above my roof. We've had some fairly strong
            > > winds this past year, but nothing out of the ordinary. However, I'm on my
            > > third antenna.
            > >
            > > I've built a stand for the mast. Its a cross of 2x8 boards, about 5"
            > > across on both arms. From each arm, I have 2x2 beams that going up towards
            > > the center to create a pyramid which meet at a bracket for the mast. The
            > > mast comes down through that bracket and slips into a similar bracket at the
            > > base.
            > >
            > > It looks something like this:
            > > http://www.tvantenna.com/products/tvreception/mounting/non-penetrating/NPRM-2.html
            > >
            > > My contraption is quite heavy, but it doesn't stop my antenna from smashing
            > > into the roof. I swear, a sparse antenna could catch enough wind to bring
            > > Larry Ellison's Spirit of America to an easy America's Cup victory. I
            > > should've taken pictures of these demolished antennae before recycling them.
            > >
            > > At any rate, I've been resisting using guy wires because I'm afriad of
            > > leaks. And, I really believe these winds would pull the wires right out.
            > > For the same reason I do not want to put on of those side/gable mounts. A
            > > friend suggested using sandbags on the arms of my contraption. Say its
            > > already about 60 lbs and I put another 100lbs of sand (total) on the ends of
            > > the arms. That's 160lbs (or more) in a 5'x5' spot on my roof.
            > >
            > > Is this a bad idea? Are there better solutions out there?
            > >
            > > Die Comcast, die.
            > >
            > > jason
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ------------------------------------
            > >
            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
          • Jason
            Thanks all. Sounds like its time too be more confident about guy wires. I ll play with my stud finder and see if I can get consistent spacing... then I ll
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 22, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              Thanks all. Sounds like its time too be more confident about guy wires. I'll play with my stud finder and see if I can get consistent spacing... then I'll know if I can find beams.
              jason
            • E Frank Ball III
              Guy wires are the way to go. Way more leverage than any base can give. My guy wires all anchor into the eaves out at the edge of the roof, so even if they
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 23, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                Guy wires are the way to go. Way more leverage than any base can give.
                My guy wires all anchor into the eaves out at the edge of the roof, so
                even if they leak it can't harm the house. I have a 20' mast with three
                antennas and even in the worst wind storms it's solid.

                --

                Frank Ball frankb@...
              • bill weber
                The OP(original poster) built a massive mount out of wood and had failure due to wind. The recommondations of using guy wires is inaugumentable. But everyone
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 23, 2010
                • 0 Attachment
                  The OP(original poster) built a massive mount out of wood and had failure due to wind. The recommondations of using guy wires is inaugumentable. But everyone is ignoring the antenna elements and the effect the wind in his unque microclimate causes on them. I set up an antenna on the High Plains of America for my father in Parker, Colo. When I returned two years later, several of the antenna's elements were gone. I could see where they had been bent back and forth by the wind until they failed. So, keep in mind the OP might need a solid element antenna also.
                   

                  >
                  > Guy wires are the way to go. Way more leverage than any base can give.
                  > My guy wires all anchor into the eaves out at the edge of the roof, so
                  > even if they leak it can't harm the house. I have a 20' mast with three
                  > antennas and even in the worst wind storms it's solid.
                  >
                  > --
                  >


                  Hotmail is redefining busy with tools for the New Busy. Get more from your inbox. See how.
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.