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RE: [HDTV-in-SFbay] Internet bandwidth is a lot more than you guys think.

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  • Richard Swank
    You know I use an over the air internet service now. As a general internet data service it is OK yet there are times when user use is heavy and not even low
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 5 4:24 PM
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      You know I use an over the air internet service now.  As a general internet data service it is OK yet there are times when user use is heavy and not even low res youtube videos come in without stops.  Adding high res transmissions will probably make me switch to cable internet service which is much wider bandwidth.

       

      From: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com [mailto:HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Neutrino78x
      Sent: Monday, April 05, 2010 3:04 PM
      To: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [HDTV-in-SFbay] Internet bandwidth is a lot more than you guys think.

       

       

      Guys, I posted this in another thread, but I thought it deserved a separate thread so people wouldn't miss it.

      Some have claimed there is less than 1 terabit per second capability in Silicon Valley. I strongly dispute that.

      In 2008, Google's campus in The Dalles, Oregon, had 3 petabits per second total bandwidth. A petabit is 1024 terabits, a terabit is 1024 gigabits.

      http://tinyurl.com/236rcm

      From the article:

      "The extended Googleplex comprises an estimated 200 petabytes of hard disk storage – enough to copy the Net's entire sprawling cornucopia dozens of times – and four petabytes of RAM. To handle the current load of 100 million queries a day, its collective input-output bandwidth must be in the neighborhood of 3 petabits per second."

      Again, that was two years ago, which is like 10 years in Silicon Valley. Imagine how much bandwidth a typical server farm for an online database must be today!!

      The issue with national broadband initiative is to increase the bandwidth to the home. Right now, with cable internet, I have like 2 Megabits per second (DSL is typically 768 Kilobits). They are talking about increasing that, for 90% of households, to 100 Mbps. This will be done through a combination of wireless to the home (WiMAX), fiber optics, DSL (phone line), and cable. In other words, a typical home user would have a choice of all those methods, competing with each other, to get high bandwidth internet.

      I don't know why anybody would object to that. It is going to make the US more competitive in the world, generate private sector jobs, create new uses for the internet.

      One of those uses, eventually, will be to replace over the air television with HD internet television. The initiative in question will not do that, but it will happen eventually. The broadcast networks have already been talking about how they would like to get rid of expensive broadcast TV.

      --Brian

    • Neutrino78x
      ... Well the National Broadband Initiative is all about consumer choices and fast internet for consumers. So, by all means, whatever is the fastest in your
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 6 9:54 PM
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        --- In HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com, "Richard Swank" <rswank@...> wrote:
        >
        > You know I use an over the air internet service now. As a general >internet
        > data service it is OK yet there are times when user use is heavy >and not
        > even low res youtube videos come in without stops. Adding high res
        > transmissions will probably make me switch to cable internet >service which
        > is much wider bandwidth.

        Well the National Broadband Initiative is all about consumer choices and fast internet for consumers. So, by all means, whatever is the fastest in your situation...We use cable internet here, too...

        Do you use satellite internet? That has a much higher latency than terrestrial wireless (signal has to go up to space, back down, through another link to the target, back up to space, etc., you can have over 1 second delay in some cases). Not sure what the bandwidth is like, although I know it is considered broadband.

        --Brian
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