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DIY Antenna Install?

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  • weinstro
    Has anyone done their own HD antenna installation? Any suggestions and recommendations? I d be interested in hearing about - method of mounting (e.g., tripod,
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 1, 2009
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      Has anyone done their own HD antenna installation?

      Any suggestions and recommendations?

      I'd be interested in hearing about
      - method of mounting (e.g., tripod, etc.)
      - installing the mount on the typical ceramic roof shingles we use in N. California
      - other challenges
      - things you'd do different
      - wind rating considerations
      - grounding and lightening protection
      - avoiding injury
      - results

      Thanks,

      Rob
    • nwsayer
      ... Uh oh. To me, that s a big alarm bell. If you have a chimney, you might consider a chimney-strap mount, but I don t think you want to mess with the
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 1, 2009
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        --- In HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com, "weinstro" <weinstro@...> wrote:
        >
        > Has anyone done their own HD antenna installation?
        >
        > Any suggestions and recommendations?
        >
        > I'd be interested in hearing about
        > - method of mounting (e.g., tripod, etc.)
        > - installing the mount on the typical ceramic roof shingles we use in N. California

        Uh oh. To me, that's a big alarm bell.

        If you have a chimney, you might consider a chimney-strap mount, but I don't think you want to mess with the integrity of a tile roof.

        We have a typical three-tab asphalt shingle roof. Tripod mounts work well, because they include a pitch pad that helps seal around the hole the screw makes.

        > - other challenges
        > - things you'd do different

        I'd have gone higher.

        > - wind rating considerations

        The 4228 doesn't weigh a lot, but it is a *sail* in the wind.

        > - grounding and lightening protection

        Since I live in Santa Clara, lightning isn't a big threat - lightning typically hits the hills more than the valley floor. Still, you should still run a ground wire bonded to the mast and tie it to a ground rod. Do what I say, not what I do. :)


        > - avoiding injury

        If it starts to fall, let go. Better to break the antenna than go with it and break yourself.

        There is a power line running along the edge of our property. The rule of thumb is to stay twice the height of your mast away. This because a wind can grab the antenna and make it do more than simply fall down.
      • Otto
        I attempted to install our antenna using a chimney strap on our chimney about 23 years ago and it was a disaster. Lasted about 2 weeks until the first winds
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 1, 2009
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          I attempted to install our antenna using a chimney strap on our chimney about 23 years ago and it was a disaster. Lasted about 2 weeks until the first winds came. I decided to have a professional installer mount the antenna on a 15 foot mast at the apex of our roof line (single story house) using 3 guy wires anchored to the roof supports. The antenna is a big Weingard (Chromstar 2000 series, 79 elements)and has stayed rock solid for all those years regardless of the weather. We removed the antenna briefly about 3 years ago when we had our metal roof installed. Reinstalled the antenna the same way and it has been fine ever since.

          I grounded the antenna by connecting the coax cable to a signal booster which is in the garage. The signal booster was then grounded to the ground wire that the cable company used for the cable tv that we don't have. The signal continues on thru a splitter for our 3 tv's. Granted we don't get heavy electrical storms here in Evergreen Valley (southeast San Jose) but I feel we are protected just in case.

          I have a rotor on the antenna that I never have to use. We get all of the HD stations that Sutro and San Bruno offer and again, our reception is fine regardless of rain, wind, or summer heat.

          Depending on your surrounding conditions, I'd highly recommend having a professional installer install the antenna as high as possible and secure it in place with guy wires. A tripod might be a good alternative if you don't want your antenna 15 feet above your roof line (which is about the recommended 30 feet above ground level). A good installer should also be able to tell you if installing it on ceramic tiles is feasible or not.

          HTTH,

          Scott

          --- In HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com, "weinstro" <weinstro@...> wrote:
          >
          > Has anyone done their own HD antenna installation?
          >
          > Any suggestions and recommendations?
          >
          > I'd be interested in hearing about
          > - method of mounting (e.g., tripod, etc.)
          > - installing the mount on the typical ceramic roof shingles we use in N. California
          > - other challenges
          > - things you'd do different
          > - wind rating considerations
          > - grounding and lightening protection
          > - avoiding injury
          > - results
          >
          > Thanks,
          >
          > Rob
          >
        • sorenk1855
          This is a nice reference to have: http://manuals.solidsignal.com/AntInstallGuide.pdf I myself have only a 5-foot chimney-mounted mast, which is not tall enough
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 1, 2009
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            This is a nice reference to have:

            http://manuals.solidsignal.com/AntInstallGuide.pdf

            I myself have only a 5-foot chimney-mounted mast, which is not tall enough so the reception of a few stations is flaky. I plan to install a taller (>10ft) mast later this year, which will definitely require guy wires. I don't know much about roofs so I will have to find anchor points without messing with the roof.

            The National Electric Code (NEC) has much to say about grounding; the requirements are sometimes hard to meet. You'll have to do your best to run the grounding wire (minimum #10 AWG) as short and as straight down to the ground rod as possible.

            Best wishes for your success!


            --- In HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com, "weinstro" <weinstro@...> wrote:
            >
            > Has anyone done their own HD antenna installation?
            >
            > Any suggestions and recommendations?
            >
            > I'd be interested in hearing about
            > - method of mounting (e.g., tripod, etc.)
            > - installing the mount on the typical ceramic roof shingles we use in N. California
            > - other challenges
            > - things you'd do different
            > - wind rating considerations
            > - grounding and lightening protection
            > - avoiding injury
            > - results
            >
            > Thanks,
            >
            > Rob
            >
          • GeraldP
            ... I did my own installation. I did not want an unsightly roof rig or install a rooftop antenna myself. I installed the antenna pole in the ground at the
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 2, 2009
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              --- In HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com, "weinstro" <weinstro@...> wrote:
              >
              > Has anyone done their own HD antenna installation?

              I did my own installation. I did not want an unsightly roof rig or install a rooftop antenna myself. I installed the antenna pole in the ground at the side of the house. I sunk a pipe into the ground into which the antenna pole is inserted; it is about 12" deep, set in concrete. A (loose) clamp at the roof line and guy wires (on a slip ring) at the top support the pole. The antenna rises about 10 ft above the eaves. It is not as high as a roof mounted antenna, but it works well (in Cupertino near 7-springs). The antenna is a 52-element Winegard UHF, about 8' long. I purposely installed it so that I could rotate the antenna manually by turning the pole near the base. That is convenient for initial adjustment, but it requires occasional readjustment after windy days, the only negative about the installation. The antenna is not noticeable from the street. It has been up since the start of HDTV (when the RCA DTC-100 first came out).


              >
              > Any suggestions and recommendations?
              >
              > I'd be interested in hearing about
              > - method of mounting (e.g., tripod, etc.)
              > - installing the mount on the typical ceramic roof shingles we use in N. California
              > - other challenges
              > - things you'd do different
              > - wind rating considerations
              > - grounding and lightening protection
              > - avoiding injury
              > - results
              >
              > Thanks,
              >
              > Rob
              >
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