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RE: [HDTV-in-SFbay] Antenna Rules

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  • Richard Swank
    If all you watch is local television I would suggest never ever go third party delivery. There are however 400+ non local television channels that are
    Message 1 of 28 , Oct 2, 2008
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      If all you watch is local television I would suggest never ever go third party delivery.  There are however 400+ non local television channels that are available via the third party delivery method and not available via local broadcasters.  The choice is yours.  Of course if you spend enough time watching television to make the cost a break even point I’d suggest you get a hobby as it might be a good idea.

       

      Third party delivery is not a quality issue as far as I’m concerned.  It’s in fact a decision is local broadcast content enough to satisfy the entertainment need?  By the way I’ve been a local broadcaster by occupation for 40+ years.

       


      From: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com [mailto: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Louis R Briones
      Sent: Thursday, October 02, 2008 4:53 PM
      To: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [HDTV-in-SFbay] Antenna Rules

       

      What I find that is a bother to me is the fact the small dish providers,
      along with Cable providers have the right to mislead the general public as
      to the ways they are delivering the local broadcast TV stations, depending
      on the area that one lives, knowing very well the the local broadcast
      television is not being directly sent to one's receiving device whatever it
      might be. I say this as mention by the following message below
      "C-Band quality is superior to any other viable delivery method. Almost all
      Cable, DirecTV, and Dish Net channels originate from the C-Band Backbone,
      the very same C-Band Master Broadcasts we enjoy first generation. Little
      dish and cable bandwidth limitations force providers to compress "the crap"
      out of the unadulterated C-Band master broadcast, before sending them to
      their "Pizza Pan" Satellites, and cable headends. Over compression causes
      channels to become fuzzy and colors are washed out. They save by delivering
      compressed "sardine TV". Why pay more for over compressed 3rd generation
      washed out TV?"
      Then you keep hearing in the news of the prices going up three times a year
      with false advertisement of Turbo boost HD. What is the meaning of Turbo
      boost HD, when it doesn't not make any different as to the way the small
      dish receiver is performing in the first place. The quality of the picture
      and the sound is still going to remain the same, with a 2 to 3 second delay,
      by the time the signal reaches one's home receiving device. then there is
      the fact of the poor quality with the sound and knowing with these small
      dish providers and your local cable operator, can not seem to give you as to
      what audio bit rate they are using.
      What I find interesting is that your local Network TV stations has a much
      better quality with respect to the picture and sound and also with their
      audio bit rate having a much higher quality.
      I agree with the person who has posted the fact as his sound reason for not
      paying for a broadcast TV stations when the local TV stations is free in the
      first place, and it is not right for one being forced to pay to view a local
      broadcast TV station also outline here in this message.

    • xhpspd
      http://www.fcc.gov/mb/facts/otard.html This is a really nice rule. When I fought my city years ago regarding a long wire HAM antenna, contract law was not
      Message 2 of 28 , Oct 3, 2008
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        http://www.fcc.gov/mb/facts/otard.html

        This is a really nice rule. When I fought my city years ago regarding
        a long wire HAM antenna, contract law was not preempted but I see now
        that it is. I won, btw. Good news for OTA viewers.

        You can only put the antenna up in areas you control, however, so the
        roof of your apartment building are still off limits. That would not
        stop me from going up and installing one and waiting to see if anyone
        complained, however... assuming I was prepared to part with the
        antenna if someone took it down.

        Allen


        --- In HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com, "Richard Swank" <rswank@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Only if the antenna installation is considered a public health or
        safety
        > issue can it be prevented and that would require a city or county
        official
        > to declare that. It might require or be best to have a building
        permit if
        > everyone gets to fighting over the installation. I believe there is
        a
        > restriction on tower height or a height that a permit is required if
        > exceeded. I'm no expert on this however,
        >
        > _____
        >
        > From: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com [mailto:HDTV-in-
        SFbay@yahoogroups.com]
        > On Behalf Of Nick Sayer
        > Sent: Thursday, October 02, 2008 11:02 AM
        > To: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [HDTV-in-SFbay] Re: Can't get KNTV digital signal in Palo
        Alto
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In HDTV-in-SFbay@ <mailto:HDTV-in-SFbay%40yahoogroups.com>
        > yahoogroups.com, "Louis R Briones" <cbandman1949@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Reception issues seem to be the problem when one's live in an
        apartment or
        >
        > > Home owner, when 20-30 miles away from the television transmitter
        site.2.
        > > then there is the cost of the three providers raising their
        prices, making
        >
        > > it very difficult for those that are on a fixed income unable to
        have any
        > > kind of service. What is one to do in this case, given this fact?
        >
        > Put up an antenna! Landlords and home owner's associations cannot
        prevent
        > you from doing
        > so. Google "FCC OTARD".
        >
        > > It would seem that the government would have found a better way
        with this
        > > reception issues with the hope of finding a much easier solution,
        finding
        > > something in the law enforcing the apartment associations alike to
        install
        >
        > > some kind of receiving antenna so that folks that are on a fixed
        income
        > > would have the full benefits to enjoy their over the air reception
        of the
        > > local channels within their given area.
        >
        > Surprise! They did!
        >
      • Allen Edwards
        I would suggest you ask if you can put an antenna on the roof. If a UHF antenna gets the stations you want, they really are not that large. A friend is using
        Message 3 of 28 , Oct 3, 2008
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          I would suggest you ask if you can put an antenna on the roof. If a
          UHF antenna gets the stations you want, they really are not that
          large. A friend is using an old one of mine and it is about a foot
          long, an inch high, and less than a foot wide. You would mount it to
          a pole on a block of wood and set it on a flat roof of an apartment
          building. You could bring the coax in through a crack in an open
          window. Perhaps a piece of wood with a hole in it could fill the
          otherwise open window. Me, I would just put the thing up there but
          asking is probably the right way to do it.

          Allen


          On Thu, Oct 2, 2008 at 3:53 PM, Herold Finkelmeyer <herry@...> wrote:
          > I've been reading this thread with interest.
          >
          > It seems to me that the FCC rule protects home-owners (and even some
          > home-renters) who want to put up an antenna, but I fail to see what it
          > does for people in my situation. I live in an apartment; the only space
          > that isn't shared is inside my apartment. So where am I to put up a
          > decent antenna? I suppose I could put one up inside, but that would
          > take up half my apartment.
          >
          > Cable and satellite aren't reasonable options, either. I watch so
          > little TV regularly, I'm not going to pay $15/mo (or more) just to
          > watch a dozen episodes of the Simpsons each year.
          >
          > I really doubt the FCC rule that's been mentioned would let me climb on
          > the roof of the apartment building I'm in to put up an antenna. And the
          > closest thing I have to a balcony is the common walkway in front.
          >
          > Anyone have any good suggestions besides downloading the shows via p2p
          > (which is basically stealing)?
          >
          > On Thu, 2 Oct 2008 15:21:56 -0700
          > "Richard Swank" <rswank@...> wrote:
          >
          >> Only if the antenna installation is considered a public health or
          >> safety issue can it be prevented and that would require a city or
          >> county official to declare that. It might require or be best to have
          >> a building permit if everyone gets to fighting over the
          >> installation. I believe there is a restriction on tower height or a
          >> height that a permit is required if exceeded. I'm no expert on this
          >> however,
          >>
          >> _____
          >>
          >> From: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
          >> [mailto:HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Nick Sayer
          >> Sent: Thursday, October 02, 2008 11:02 AM
          >> To: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
          >> Subject: [HDTV-in-SFbay] Re: Can't get KNTV digital signal in Palo
          >> Alto
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> --- In HDTV-in-SFbay@ <mailto:HDTV-in-SFbay%40yahoogroups.com>
          >> yahoogroups.com, "Louis R Briones" <cbandman1949@...> wrote:
          >> >
          >> > Reception issues seem to be the problem when one's live in an
          >> > apartment or
          >>
          >> > Home owner, when 20-30 miles away from the television transmitter
          >> > site.2. then there is the cost of the three providers raising their
          >> > prices, making
          >>
          >> > it very difficult for those that are on a fixed income unable to
          >> > have any kind of service. What is one to do in this case, given
          >> > this fact?
          >>
          >> Put up an antenna! Landlords and home owner's associations cannot
          >> prevent you from doing
          >> so. Google "FCC OTARD".
          >>
          >> > It would seem that the government would have found a better way
          >> > with this reception issues with the hope of finding a much easier
          >> > solution, finding something in the law enforcing the apartment
          >> > associations alike to install
          >>
          >> > some kind of receiving antenna so that folks that are on a fixed
          >> > income would have the full benefits to enjoy their over the air
          >> > reception of the local channels within their given area.
          >>
          >> Surprise! They did!
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >
          >
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