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Re: 12 volt input on LCD TV ??

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  • Bob
    The exception to what I wrote below would be wall wart AC to DC power supplies, the ones with a male plug designed to plug directly into an AC wall outlet.
    Message 1 of 10 , Aug 8, 2005
      The exception to what I wrote below would be wall wart AC to DC power
      supplies, the ones with a male plug designed to plug directly into an
      AC wall outlet. Power regulation can be very poor on these. Full
      load versus no load voltages can be quite different. In these cases
      it's a good idea to match up voltage and current when buying a
      replacement. Not to mention polarity. Sometimes plus (+) is on the
      center pin, sometimes minus (-) is on the center pin. But I
      digress...

      LopakaBob


      --- In HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com, "Bob" <Lopakabob@a...> wrote:
      > One can have too high a voltage but one can't have too many amps.
      A device will only draw the current it requires, provided sufficient
      > current is available, which isn't an issue in this case. Ahhh,
      Ohm's Law, brings back memories...
      >
      > Also, you have to be careful of DC to AC power converters. Most
      put out a square wave rather than a sine wave.
      >
      > LopakaBob
      >
      >
      > --- In HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com, "keenan424" <keenan@s...>
      wrote:
      > > I would use the AC/DC converter that came with the display and
      plug
      > it into a DC/AC power converter designed for automotive use. If you
      > just draw a 12 volt feed off the vehicle it may have too may amps
      to
      > feed the display directly. I couldn't find anything on that display
      > but if it doesn't come with a converter see if it has a miliamp
      > reading by the input and you can get a universal AC/DC converter
      from
      > places like
      > > Radio Shack.
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com, "Chris Rempel"
      <chrisrem@r...>
      > > wrote:
      > > > It depends on how well the regulation circuitry on that
      particular
      > > set is.
      > > > There is a good possibility that it would work just fine, but I
      > > would check
      > > > with the manufactures web site first. Also you may want to see
      how
      > > clean
      > > > your 12V power is. If is running strictly off the battery, it
      > will
      > > be very
      > > > clean, but the alternator, or other charging device may
      introduce
      > > noise and
      > > > spikes into the system which may not be tolerated by the TV.
      Now
      > > if the
      > > > circuitry in the TV is built for a mobile power environment, it
      > > should
      > > > handle it just fine.
      > > >
      > > > Chris aka the antenna doctor
      > > >
      > > > -----Original Message-----
      > > > From: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
      > > > [mailto:HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of vineguy123
      > > > Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2005 8:29 PM
      > > > To: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
      > > > Subject: [HDTV-in-SFbay] 12 volt input on LCD tv ??
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > I know this may be a bit off topic, but there are some very
      > talented
      > > > electronics wizards out there that could probably answer this
      > > easily.
      > > > I'm looking at a "GenesisTM GTA200A" LCD 20" TV that has a "DC
      > 12V"
      > > > input in the back where the power supply plugs in. Would it be
      > safe
      > > to
      > > > run this directly from the 12 volt system in my camper? I know
      my
      > 12
      > > > volt system will vary from 11.5 to 14.0 volts during
      > > charge/discharge
      > > > cycles. could this harm the TV? How much voltage variation is
      > > > acceptable in a typical LCD unit?
      > > > Phil
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
    • bobby6048
      ... Ah yes, E=MC², no..... E=IR..... :)
      Message 2 of 10 , Aug 8, 2005
        --- In HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com, "Bob" <Lopakabob@a...> wrote:
        > One can have too high a voltage but one can't have too many amps. A
        > device will only draw the current it requires, provided sufficient
        > current is available, which isn't an issue in this case. Ahhh, Ohm's
        > Law, brings back memories...
        >
        > Also, you have to be careful of DC to AC power converters. Most put
        > out a square wave rather than a sine wave.
        >
        > LopakaBob

        Ah yes, E=MC², no..... E=IR..... :)
      • Bob
        Yep, in this case I=E/R. The current would be equal to the voltage (12 volts dc) divided by the resistance, aka the load. Moving on to quadratic equations and
        Message 3 of 10 , Aug 8, 2005
          Yep, in this case I=E/R. The current would be equal to the voltage
          (12 volts dc) divided by the resistance, aka the load.

          Moving on to quadratic equations and parabolic reflectors for
          microwave dishes... or not, :-)

          LopakaBob


          --- In HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com, "bobby6048" <bobcapl@p...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Ah yes, E=MC², no..... E=IR..... :)
        • Chris Rempel
          Time for my layman s explanation of electricity; If you think of electricity as water flowing through a pipe; The voltage would be the same as the water
          Message 4 of 10 , Aug 8, 2005
            Time for my layman's explanation of electricity; If you think of
            electricity as water flowing through a pipe; The voltage would be the same
            as the water pressure. The current measured in amps is the amount of water
            flow. The resistance is the restrictions to the flow of the water, i.e. the
            size of the water pipe. The larger the pipe, the greater the water flow and
            the lower the resistance. Power is the combined effect of voltage and
            current which would be the same as the volume of water flowing in a
            particular time. A battery is like a large tank of water. The current
            capacity is the maximum potential amount of electricity that can safely flow
            out of a battery. An amplifier is the same as a pump. You can have a very
            large tank of water with a large pipe coming out of it with a valve. If you
            open the valve a tiny amount, only a trickle of water will come out, and
            that may be all you need. I hope this helps people to visualize what
            electricity is.

            Chris aka the antenna doctor
            www.antennadoctor.com
            650-548-1992

            -----Original Message-----
            From: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of keenan424
            Sent: Monday, August 08, 2005 1:31 AM
            To: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [HDTV-in-SFbay] Re: 12 volt input on LCD TV ??


            I would use the AC/DC converter that came with the display and plug it
            into a DC/AC power converter designed for automotive use. If you just
            draw a 12 volt feed off the vehicle it may have too may amps to feed
            the display directly. I couldn't find anything on that display but if
            it doesn't come with a converter see if it has a miliamp reading by
            the input and you can get a universal AC/DC converter from places like
            Radio Shack.


            --- In HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com, "Chris Rempel" <chrisrem@r...>
            wrote:
            > It depends on how well the regulation circuitry on that particular
            set is.
            > There is a good possibility that it would work just fine, but I
            would check
            > with the manufactures web site first. Also you may want to see how
            clean
            > your 12V power is. If is running strictly off the battery, it will
            be very
            > clean, but the alternator, or other charging device may introduce
            noise and
            > spikes into the system which may not be tolerated by the TV. Now
            if the
            > circuitry in the TV is built for a mobile power environment, it
            should
            > handle it just fine.
            >
            > Chris aka the antenna doctor
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
            > [mailto:HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of vineguy123
            > Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2005 8:29 PM
            > To: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [HDTV-in-SFbay] 12 volt input on LCD tv ??
            >
            >
            > I know this may be a bit off topic, but there are some very talented
            > electronics wizards out there that could probably answer this
            easily.
            > I'm looking at a "GenesisTM GTA200A" LCD 20" TV that has a "DC 12V"
            > input in the back where the power supply plugs in. Would it be safe
            to
            > run this directly from the 12 volt system in my camper? I know my 12
            > volt system will vary from 11.5 to 14.0 volts during
            charge/discharge
            > cycles. could this harm the TV? How much voltage variation is
            > acceptable in a typical LCD unit?
            > Phil
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links







            Yahoo! Groups Links
          • vineguy123
            Chris, Thank you for your original reply. I think I will wire it so I can run off batteries when we re not hooked up to shore power , but use the A/C when
            Message 5 of 10 , Aug 9, 2005
              Chris,
              Thank you for your original reply. I think I will wire it so I can
              run off batteries when we're not hooked up to "shore power", but use
              the A/C when that's available. I like your layman's explanation of
              electricity, that puts it in terms I can understand. I would add
              however that electricity does not always obey the rules. Unlike
              water it can travel pretty effectively outside of the "pipe", such
              as on the surface of a wet firehose.....
              Thanks again,
              Phil

              --- In HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com, "Chris Rempel" <chrisrem@r...>
              wrote:
              > Time for my layman's explanation of electricity; If you think of
              > electricity as water flowing through a pipe; The voltage would be
              the same
              > as the water pressure. The current measured in amps is the amount
              of water
              > flow. The resistance is the restrictions to the flow of the
              water, i.e. the
              > size of the water pipe. The larger the pipe, the greater the water
              flow and
              > the lower the resistance. Power is the combined effect of voltage
              and
              > current which would be the same as the volume of water flowing in a
              > particular time. A battery is like a large tank of water. The
              current
              > capacity is the maximum potential amount of electricity that can
              safely flow
              > out of a battery. An amplifier is the same as a pump. You can have
              a very
              > large tank of water with a large pipe coming out of it with a
              valve. If you
              > open the valve a tiny amount, only a trickle of water will come
              out, and
              > that may be all you need. I hope this helps people to visualize
              what
              > electricity is.
              >
              > Chris aka the antenna doctor
              > www.antennadoctor.com
              > 650-548-1992
              >
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
              > [mailto:HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of keenan424
              > Sent: Monday, August 08, 2005 1:31 AM
              > To: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: [HDTV-in-SFbay] Re: 12 volt input on LCD TV ??
              >
              >
              > I would use the AC/DC converter that came with the display and
              plug it
              > into a DC/AC power converter designed for automotive use. If you
              just
              > draw a 12 volt feed off the vehicle it may have too may amps to
              feed
              > the display directly. I couldn't find anything on that display but
              if
              > it doesn't come with a converter see if it has a miliamp reading by
              > the input and you can get a universal AC/DC converter from places
              like
              > Radio Shack.
              >
              >
              > --- In HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com, "Chris Rempel"
              <chrisrem@r...>
              > wrote:
              > > It depends on how well the regulation circuitry on that
              particular
              > set is.
              > > There is a good possibility that it would work just fine, but I
              > would check
              > > with the manufactures web site first. Also you may want to see
              how
              > clean
              > > your 12V power is. If is running strictly off the battery, it
              will
              > be very
              > > clean, but the alternator, or other charging device may introduce
              > noise and
              > > spikes into the system which may not be tolerated by the TV. Now
              > if the
              > > circuitry in the TV is built for a mobile power environment, it
              > should
              > > handle it just fine.
              > >
              > > Chris aka the antenna doctor
              > >
              > > -----Original Message-----
              > > From: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
              > > [mailto:HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of vineguy123
              > > Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2005 8:29 PM
              > > To: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
              > > Subject: [HDTV-in-SFbay] 12 volt input on LCD tv ??
              > >
              > >
              > > I know this may be a bit off topic, but there are some very
              talented
              > > electronics wizards out there that could probably answer this
              > easily.
              > > I'm looking at a "GenesisTM GTA200A" LCD 20" TV that has a "DC
              12V"
              > > input in the back where the power supply plugs in. Would it be
              safe
              > to
              > > run this directly from the 12 volt system in my camper? I know
              my 12
              > > volt system will vary from 11.5 to 14.0 volts during
              > charge/discharge
              > > cycles. could this harm the TV? How much voltage variation is
              > > acceptable in a typical LCD unit?
              > > Phil
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
            • Chris Rempel
              Hello Phil, I m glad you like my layman s explanation of electricity. These types of things helped a lot of people when I was tutoring other students in
              Message 6 of 10 , Aug 9, 2005
                Hello Phil,
                I'm glad you like my layman's explanation of electricity. These types of
                things helped a lot of people when I was tutoring other students in college.
                Of course this analogy is not perfect, but it does cover the basics. When
                you get into AC and especially RF it needs other analogies to support it.

                Chris

                -----Original Message-----
                From: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
                [mailto:HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of vineguy123
                Sent: Tuesday, August 09, 2005 4:36 PM
                To: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [HDTV-in-SFbay] Re: 12 volt input on LCD TV ??


                Chris,
                Thank you for your original reply. I think I will wire it so I can
                run off batteries when we're not hooked up to "shore power", but use
                the A/C when that's available. I like your layman's explanation of
                electricity, that puts it in terms I can understand. I would add
                however that electricity does not always obey the rules. Unlike
                water it can travel pretty effectively outside of the "pipe", such
                as on the surface of a wet firehose.....
                Thanks again,
                Phil

                --- In HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com, "Chris Rempel" <chrisrem@r...>
                wrote:
                > Time for my layman's explanation of electricity; If you think of
                > electricity as water flowing through a pipe; The voltage would be
                the same
                > as the water pressure. The current measured in amps is the amount
                of water
                > flow. The resistance is the restrictions to the flow of the
                water, i.e. the
                > size of the water pipe. The larger the pipe, the greater the water
                flow and
                > the lower the resistance. Power is the combined effect of voltage
                and
                > current which would be the same as the volume of water flowing in a
                > particular time. A battery is like a large tank of water. The
                current
                > capacity is the maximum potential amount of electricity that can
                safely flow
                > out of a battery. An amplifier is the same as a pump. You can have
                a very
                > large tank of water with a large pipe coming out of it with a
                valve. If you
                > open the valve a tiny amount, only a trickle of water will come
                out, and
                > that may be all you need. I hope this helps people to visualize
                what
                > electricity is.
                >
                > Chris aka the antenna doctor
                > www.antennadoctor.com
                > 650-548-1992
                >
                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
                > [mailto:HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of keenan424
                > Sent: Monday, August 08, 2005 1:31 AM
                > To: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: [HDTV-in-SFbay] Re: 12 volt input on LCD TV ??
                >
                >
                > I would use the AC/DC converter that came with the display and
                plug it
                > into a DC/AC power converter designed for automotive use. If you
                just
                > draw a 12 volt feed off the vehicle it may have too may amps to
                feed
                > the display directly. I couldn't find anything on that display but
                if
                > it doesn't come with a converter see if it has a miliamp reading by
                > the input and you can get a universal AC/DC converter from places
                like
                > Radio Shack.
                >
                >
                > --- In HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com, "Chris Rempel"
                <chrisrem@r...>
                > wrote:
                > > It depends on how well the regulation circuitry on that
                particular
                > set is.
                > > There is a good possibility that it would work just fine, but I
                > would check
                > > with the manufactures web site first. Also you may want to see
                how
                > clean
                > > your 12V power is. If is running strictly off the battery, it
                will
                > be very
                > > clean, but the alternator, or other charging device may introduce
                > noise and
                > > spikes into the system which may not be tolerated by the TV. Now
                > if the
                > > circuitry in the TV is built for a mobile power environment, it
                > should
                > > handle it just fine.
                > >
                > > Chris aka the antenna doctor
                > >
                > > -----Original Message-----
                > > From: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
                > > [mailto:HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of vineguy123
                > > Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2005 8:29 PM
                > > To: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
                > > Subject: [HDTV-in-SFbay] 12 volt input on LCD tv ??
                > >
                > >
                > > I know this may be a bit off topic, but there are some very
                talented
                > > electronics wizards out there that could probably answer this
                > easily.
                > > I'm looking at a "GenesisTM GTA200A" LCD 20" TV that has a "DC
                12V"
                > > input in the back where the power supply plugs in. Would it be
                safe
                > to
                > > run this directly from the 12 volt system in my camper? I know
                my 12
                > > volt system will vary from 11.5 to 14.0 volts during
                > charge/discharge
                > > cycles. could this harm the TV? How much voltage variation is
                > > acceptable in a typical LCD unit?
                > > Phil
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links






                Yahoo! Groups Links
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