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RE: [HDTV-in-SFbay] Re: No KTVU on Comcast -irony

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  • Deepak Munjal
    Squabble costs Cox customers their HDTV view of games 01:00 AM EDT on Friday, October 29, 2004 BY ANDY SMITH Journal Television Writer Lynn Dressler, a travel
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 4, 2004
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      Squabble costs Cox customers their HDTV view of games

      01:00 AM EDT on Friday, October 29, 2004


      BY ANDY SMITH
      Journal Television Writer



      Lynn Dressler, a travel agent living in North Kingstown, went out and got a high-definition TV set.
      She signed up for high-definition service from Cox. So she figured she would see the World Series in
      crisp high-def.

      Nope. Thanks to a long-running disagreement between Cox and LIN TV, which operates both CBS affilate
      Channel 12 and Fox 64, this week's historic World Series between the Red Sox and the Cardinals was
      not shown on Cox in high definition.

      "We're paying, and we're ticked off that we're not getting what we're paying for," Dressler said.
      "Everyone's advertising for high-def, and you go out and get the stupid thing, and then you can't
      get the game."

      (The same squabble kept Cox customers from getting the Super Bowl in high definition from Cox last
      January.)

      But across the Massachusetts border, Comcast customers throughout Southeastern Massachusetts were
      able to get the World Series in high definition from WFXT, the Fox affiliate in Boston.

      Cox spokesman John Wolfe wouldn't give figures on how many Cox customers can receive high definition
      TV through Cox. About 300,000 Rhode Island households get Cox, with about a third of those getting
      Cox's digital cable.

      High definition television is the top tier of digital television, offering a picture with seven
      times the clarity of an old-fashioned analog TV set. "It stops you in your tracks. It's
      mind-boggling," said Dressler of the HDTV picture.

      So why can't Dressler, and other Cox customers in Rhode Island, receive CBS and Fox programming on
      high definition cable?

      Part of the problem is a disagreement over exactly what Cox will be transmitting. A digital signal
      can carry more information than the old analog signals, so a station can broadcast more than just
      one channel.

      LIN wants Cox to broadcast its entire digital signal, not just network programming from Fox or CBS.

      Cox says no. "We don't want to write them a blank check for spectrum," said Wolfe.

      At the moment, the only other thing on Fox's digital bandwidth, besides Fox programming, is the
      station's weather radar. But Jay Howell, general manager for Channel 12 and Fox 64, said LIN may
      choose to put something else there in the future.

      Paul Karpowicz, vice-president of television for LIN, said that Cox charges its customers for
      digital cable and for the box used to get high definition TV.

      In order to get high-definition TV on Cox, you must first have digital cable. Then you must have a
      special cable box, which costs $9.99 per month, about $5 more than a regular digital cable box.

      If the company wants to make CBS and Fox programming part of that package, Karpowicz said, LIN
      should get "value" in return.

      Value, he added, doesn't necessarily mean money, but might involve Cox adding programming in other
      markets. LIN, based in Rhode Island, owns 25 TV stations.

      Wolfe said the decision is entirely in LIN's hands. "It's up to them to determine when to make their
      high-definition signal available," he said.

      Karpowicz said LIN is in "ongoing negotiations" with Cox, but didn't have a timetable for when the
      issue might be resolved.

      Cox has already reached agreements with ABC affiliate Channel 6 and NBC affiliate Channel 10 to
      broadcast their network programming. Cox spokesman Wolfe declined to give details on Cox's
      arrangements with other stations.

      To complicate matters, it is still possible to receive high-definition programming from both CBS and
      Fox in Rhode Island without using cable -- if you have the right equipment.

      That's because both Channel 12 and Fox 64 broadcast their high definition signals over the air.

      High definition TVs come in two configurations, one with a HD receiver already built in. The other,
      often advertised as "HDTV ready," requires either a high-definition cable box or an external
      high-definition receiver and an antenna.

      If you have a TV set with the receiver already inside, or buy an external receiver, then you can get
      a high definition signal without cable.

      "We are providing a high-definition signal for free right now, I want to be very clear about that,"
      Howell said.



      -----Original Message-----
      From: Eric [mailto:rinpoche420@...]
      Sent: Thursday, November 04, 2004 4:39 PM
      To: HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [HDTV-in-SFbay] Re: No KTVU on Comcast -irony



      any chance that you can post the text here, on the group??

      thanks!

      --- In HDTV-in-SFbay@yahoogroups.com, "stkaus" <skaus@c...> wrote:
      >
      > As part of keeping the pressure on KTVU, I thought I would post the
      > URL of an article about Cox Cable taking the exact opposite
      position
      > to Cox as KTVU owner.
      >
      > http://www.projo.com/redsox/content/projo_20041029_hdsox.13700e.html
      >
      > (you have to register to read, but there is no charge)





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    • Leo G. Divinagracia III
      ... that s why www.bugmenot.com is so great: username: me@me.localhost password: password use that to read that article... ;)
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 5, 2004
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        stkaus wrote:

        >
        > http://www.projo.com/redsox/content/projo_20041029_hdsox.13700e.html
        >
        > (you have to register to read, but there is no charge)
        >

        that's why www.bugmenot.com is so great:

        username: me@...
        password: password

        use that to read that article... ;)
      • hyy55
        Well there s no talk about carriage fees. In a way, I would prefer that cable and satellite companies push back when local stations demand all the multicasted
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 5, 2004
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          Well there's no talk about carriage fees.

          In a way, I would prefer that cable and satellite
          companies push back when local stations demand all the
          multicasted SD channels get carried.

          Because if they can't get those SD channels
          distributed, then maybe they devote their full
          bandwidth to HDTV.

          Anyways, no lost tears that Cox is getting screwed
          over. But if their HDTV subscribers were a more
          significant number, I'm sure they'd make a deal.

          I think Comcast will have more leverage here, since
          KTVU's carriage agreement for their main channel is
          also coming up.



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