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Pre-commercial Scale Trellis

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  • puffyjbo
    Hello, I m toying with the idea of planting a 200x100 space with hops next year as a trial and growing more the year after if it goes well. I have a fairly
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 1, 2009
      Hello,

      I'm toying with the idea of planting a 200x100' space with hops next year as a trial and growing more the year after if it goes well. I have a fairly tight budget for this and am looking for some trellis brainstorming.

      If I do a 16-20' tall trellis with wooden poles I can afford to do about half of this area without changing the budget.

      I've found a lot of home-sized trellises in the archives here that are 12' high. If I only go that high I can afford to do the whole thing.

      My thought is that if the next few years go well the plants will be providing enough return to pay for the taller trellis. If things go poorly it doesn't matter much.

      My question is, if I can do twice as many plants for roughly the same cost, will that extra 4-6' of trellis height be more than made up for?

      Thanks,
      Jim
    • Ronald Myers
      Hi I would do the taller trellis with the area you can afford and let the profit from them pay for more trellis later. My plants are first year plants and I
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 1, 2009
        Hi
        I would do the taller trellis with the area you can afford and let the profit from them pay for more trellis later. My plants are first year plants and I only have 7' trellis that I plan on extending to 14' next spring. I have 50 plants and the tallest have the most hopps that are about 2 weeks from harvest. The taller the bines the stronger they are, more leaves = more hopps. I planted in 1 gal pots in May and transplanted in June to a 128' fenceline that I used for a trellis. When I extend to 14' I will have a cable pulley system every 20' so I can lower for a second harvest. In a couple of years I plan on seperating the resones and planting both sides of the fence line. My plants are 2' apart and 2' from the fenceline. If I can't make any money next year I probably won't do the second row.
        Ron in CA

        --- On Thu, 10/1/09, puffyjbo <jbosmith@...> wrote:

        From: puffyjbo <jbosmith@...>
        Subject: [Grow-Hops] Pre-commercial Scale Trellis
        To: Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 8:31 PM

         
        Hello,

        I'm toying with the idea of planting a 200x100' space with hops next year as a trial and growing more the year after if it goes well. I have a fairly tight budget for this and am looking for some trellis brainstorming.

        If I do a 16-20' tall trellis with wooden poles I can afford to do about half of this area without changing the budget.

        I've found a lot of home-sized trellises in the archives here that are 12' high. If I only go that high I can afford to do the whole thing.

        My thought is that if the next few years go well the plants will be providing enough return to pay for the taller trellis. If things go poorly it doesn't matter much.

        My question is, if I can do twice as many plants for roughly the same cost, will that extra 4-6' of trellis height be more than made up for?

        Thanks,
        Jim


      • John Whitaker
        I think it largely depends on the hops you want to grow.  If you go with Cascades, in my experience, the bulk of the growth happens in the last ten feet of
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 2, 2009
          I think it largely depends on the hops you want to grow.  If you go with Cascades, in my experience, the bulk of the growth happens in the last ten feet of the bine, assuming that its a 20ft tall trellis.  Hops need as much sun exposure as possible, something a smaller trellis may not be able to provide and the growth itself will provide too much shade for the undergrowth.

          Hope that makes sense.

          John L. Whitaker



          --- On Thu, 10/1/09, puffyjbo <jbosmith@...> wrote:

          From: puffyjbo <jbosmith@...>
          Subject: [Grow-Hops] Pre-commercial Scale Trellis
          To: Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 11:31 PM

           

          Hello,

          I'm toying with the idea of planting a 200x100' space with hops next year as a trial and growing more the year after if it goes well. I have a fairly tight budget for this and am looking for some trellis brainstorming.

          If I do a 16-20' tall trellis with wooden poles I can afford to do about half of this area without changing the budget.

          I've found a lot of home-sized trellises in the archives here that are 12' high. If I only go that high I can afford to do the whole thing.

          My thought is that if the next few years go well the plants will be providing enough return to pay for the taller trellis. If things go poorly it doesn't matter much.

          My question is, if I can do twice as many plants for roughly the same cost, will that extra 4-6' of trellis height be more than made up for?

          Thanks,
          Jim


        • Jamie McCarty
          I would have to agree. My trellis is only 12 , and I only got hops on the top 4 feet of the plant. On Fri, Oct 2, 2009 at 7:44 AM, John Whitaker
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 2, 2009
            I would have to agree. My trellis is only 12", and I only got hops on
            the top 4 feet of the plant.

            On Fri, Oct 2, 2009 at 7:44 AM, John Whitaker <johnlwhitaker@...> wrote:


            I think it largely depends on the hops you want to grow.  If you go
            with Cascades, in my experience, the bulk of the growth happens in the
            last ten feet of the bine, assuming that its a 20ft tall trellis.
            Hops need as much sun exposure as possible, something a smaller
            trellis may not be able to provide and the growth itself will provide
            too much shade for the undergrowth.
            Hope that makes sense.
            John L. Whitaker
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