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Re: Japanese Beetles

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  • abeck1969
    In a matter of 3 days my hops plants were being eaten alive by Japanese beetles. Yesterday I bought a trap, placed it away from the hops and shook the bines
    Message 1 of 15 , Jul 1, 2007
      In a matter of 3 days my hops plants were being eaten alive by
      Japanese beetles. Yesterday I bought a trap, placed it away from the
      hops and shook the bines to get the beetles airborne. By the end of
      the day the trap was loaded and the hops saved. Ahhhh...I feel better
      now.

      We used to gather them up by hand when I was a kid. We would get a
      handful and throw it onto the surface of our pond. The bass would
      feed on them like mad. Unfortunately I don't have a pond where I live
      now :-(

      -Adam
      http://www.brewlounge.com

      --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, stencil <etcs.ret@...> wrote:
      >
      > in [Grow-Hops] Digest Number 41
      > brewmeisterintng wrote:
      >
      >
      > > [ ... ] the largest threat to my hops are them darned
      > > beetles. In years past I would comb over my plants on a ladder
      picking
      > > them off and ripping off their heads but I have resorted to
      pestisides.
      >
      > Use traps upwind to keep them off the hops in the first
      > place. The key is to keep the grub population down in the
      > springtime, before they hatch out. Sevin is good stuff but
      > RTFM.
      >
      >
      > [
      > http://www.pueblo.gsa.gov/cic_text/housing/japanese-beetle/jbeetle.html
      > ]
      >
      > gds, stencil
      >
    • jwright@growinhydro.com
      I ve about eliminated my JB problem with a product called Milky Spore. It took about two years, but I only saw a few dozen beetles this year. By inoculating
      Message 2 of 15 , Oct 12, 2009
        I've about eliminated my JB problem with a product called Milky Spore.  It took about two years, but I only saw a few dozen beetles this year.  By inoculating the soil with Bacillus popilliae, it kills the grubs when ingested and reduces the emerging population.  Less beetles and fewer new eggs.  The eggs that do get layed and subsequent grubs that hatch, again ingest the milky spore and die; and the cycle continues.  Each grub that dies, fuels a new colony of Bacillus popilliae continuing to inoculate the soil.  It only targets the Japanese Beetle and will not affect beneficial insects.  I highly suggest it.
      • reddart1967
        While this will probably work to reduce grub damage to your lawn, I really don t think it will do anything to prevent the beetles from flying the short
        Message 3 of 15 , Oct 13, 2009
          While this will probably work to reduce grub damage to your lawn, I really don't think it will do anything to prevent the beetles from flying the short distance from outside your yard to your plants...unless you have a really big yard.

          I had reduced damage to my plants this year, but it was because of the weather, I believe (relatively cool summer)...

          --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, <jwright@...> wrote:
          >
          > I've about eliminated my JB problem with a product called Milky Spore. It took about two years, but I only saw a few dozen beetles this year. By inoculating the soil with Bacillus popilliae, it kills the grubs when ingested and reduces the emerging population. Less beetles and fewer new eggs. The eggs that do get layed and subsequent grubs that hatch, again ingest the milky spore and die; and the cycle continues. Each grub that dies, fuels a new colony of Bacillus popilliae continuing to inoculate the soil. It only targets the Japanese Beetle and will not affect beneficial insects. I highly suggest it.
          >
        • t2000kwt
          ... Milky spore can help a bit, but it works much better when everyone around you is also using it. One whole town used it and it made a real difference.
          Message 4 of 15 , Oct 13, 2009
            --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, <jwright@...> wrote:
            >
            > I've about eliminated my JB problem with a product called Milky Spore. It took about two years, but I only saw a few dozen beetles this year.

            Milky spore can help a bit, but it works much better when everyone around you is also using it. One whole town used it and it made a real difference. Usually, it only makes a small difference if you're the only one applying it to your lawn.

            The traps work well for many people but only if they are set up away from plants you want to keep them off. If they're too close, they may stop and nibble on their way to the trap.

            Don
          • William
            I saw a Youtube once where a guy set the JB traps very high up on PVC and caught way more. But yes, keep them away from your plants. And apparently, Guinea
            Message 5 of 15 , Oct 13, 2009
              I saw a Youtube once where a guy set the JB traps very high up on PVC and caught way more.

              But yes, keep them away from your plants.

              And apparently, Guinea Hens are extremely effective in controlling JB.

              Bill Ross

              --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, t2000kwt <no_reply@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, <jwright@> wrote:
              > >
              > > I've about eliminated my JB problem with a product called Milky Spore. It took about two years, but I only saw a few dozen beetles this year.
              >
              > Milky spore can help a bit, but it works much better when everyone around you is also using it. One whole town used it and it made a real difference. Usually, it only makes a small difference if you're the only one applying it to your lawn.
              >
              > The traps work well for many people but only if they are set up away from plants you want to keep them off. If they're too close, they may stop and nibble on their way to the trap.
              >
              > Don
              >
            • t2000kwt
              ... As long as you can keep them from straying away and getting eaten by foxes or other animals. I lost all of mine pretty quickly that way when I lived in the
              Message 6 of 15 , Oct 13, 2009
                --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, "William" <woundedegomusic@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > And apparently, Guinea Hens are extremely effective in controlling JB.
                >

                As long as you can keep them from straying away and getting eaten by foxes or other animals. I lost all of mine pretty quickly that way when I lived in the country. But even chickens are good for keeping insects off your garden vegetables, and they should be good for the hops, too, at least on the bottom parts. The top parts are better off with predatory insects or perhaps certain birds if you can attract them.

                Don
              • Linda
                Hi Vicci, You have my sympathies, and I have heard that you need to give the traps as presents to your NEIGHBOURS {LOL}. Linda
                Message 7 of 15 , Oct 13, 2009
                  Hi Vicci,

                  You have my sympathies, and I have heard that you need to give the traps as
                  presents to your NEIGHBOURS {LOL}.

                  Linda

                  -----
                  > We were told by several people that the traps actually bring the beetles
                  > to the yard and it is to be noted that this year we did not have that
                  > problem and we did have less beetles.
                  > Just my experience..others may vary...but I wont be using those traps
                  > anymore.
                • Jeffery Fishback
                  My problem, with my brother s chickens, is that they scratch at the soft compost on top of my rhizomes. They dig holes looking for bugs and making beds. I have
                  Message 8 of 15 , Oct 13, 2009
                    My problem, with my brother's chickens, is that they scratch at the soft compost on top of my rhizomes. They dig holes looking for bugs and making beds. I have been told guineas are better behaved. But, I don't lnow that to be true.


                    From: t2000kwt <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
                    To: Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Tuesday, October 13, 2009 5:40:31 PM
                    Subject: [Grow-Hops] Re: Japanese Beetles

                     



                    --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogrou ps.com, "William" <woundedegomusic@ ...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > And apparently, Guinea Hens are extremely effective in controlling JB.
                    >

                    As long as you can keep them from straying away and getting eaten by foxes or other animals. I lost all of mine pretty quickly that way when I lived in the country. But even chickens are good for keeping insects off your garden vegetables, and they should be good for the hops, too, at least on the bottom parts. The top parts are better off with predatory insects or perhaps certain birds if you can attract them.

                    Don

                  • Jesse Wright
                    If you ve watched JB behavior and tried to fight them the way I have over the past 8 years, you ll notice few consistent things about them. It s all about
                    Message 9 of 15 , Oct 14, 2009
                      If you've watched JB behavior and tried to fight them the way I have over
                      the past 8 years, you'll notice few consistent things about them. It's all
                      about eat, sex and die. If your yard has the plants that they are willing
                      to eat, then they in most cases will stay on that plant, eat, partner, and
                      die.

                      If you have a large annual problem, then you have a food item in your yard
                      that is perpetuating the cycle, as they put new eggs in the soil close to
                      the food plants. In my case I never had a problem until I planted grape
                      vines. Yes they can fly, but I've noticed that the mass will stay within
                      about 1/4 to 1 acre area. I have a 1/3 acre yard and have used the
                      pheromone bait traps, and that was the only time that I noticed such an
                      increase in numbers to the yard. If you have several acres an can bait them
                      to an area clear across the yard away from your plants of interest, then I
                      would surmise a higher success rate. But it was a great failure for me.

                      I have used several other methods like foliar applications of Neem oil,
                      Pyrethrin, Seven dust, and a great systemic Imidacloprid. But none had such
                      an impact as did the Milky Spore. since their planting, I have never been
                      able to harvest any grapes from my vines because the beetles defoliate them
                      plants so rapidly.

                      This year I took over 8 lbs of grapes, for the first time ever. Not saying
                      that everyone will have the same level of success as I have so far, who
                      knows, next year my be a problem. But it was notable, and I got results. I
                      would say that the few dozen JB that I did see this year probably did fly in
                      form neighbors yards, but I'll take a few that I can pinch, over the 1000's
                      I have fought with in the past.

                      Just my 2 cents...
                    • kpeeling.rm
                      I ve been reading the posts about dealing with these pesty beetles and there has been some good advice. One thing that hasn t been mentioned and is labor
                      Message 10 of 15 , Oct 14, 2009
                        I've been reading the posts about dealing with these pesty beetles and there has been some good advice. One thing that hasn't been mentioned and is labor intensive the first year is not too unlike the original post except one thing. I had grapes over run by beetles. I went out early in the morning when it was still cool. The beetles move slowly then. I had a bucket of washer with dish soap (to break the surface tension)and would hold it under the cluster of beetles. The would drop off to try to escape as I disturbed them and they dropped into the bucket and drowned. It took quite a few mornings and I caught most of them. The next year I had significantly fewer and the third year almost none. They didn't get the chance to lay eggs that way. NO real cost involved, only time. Just a suggestion. KP

                        --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, "brewmeisterintng" <jdvisger@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > I live in Tennessee and the largest threat to my hops are them darned
                        > beetles. In years past I would comb over my plants on a ladder picking
                        > them off and ripping off their heads but I have resorted to pestisides.
                        > I have some that says it is OK for vegetables and after three days
                        > leaves no ill effects. That is my plan for this year. I haven't heard
                        > anyone out there talking about them so I thought I will bring it us.
                        > Regards,
                        > James
                        >
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