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Growing hops vertical vs horizontal

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  • Walter
    OK so my post on hops in planters gave me some GREAT info, now I am pondering growing vert for about 8 feet then growing horizontal. Does this effect yield and
    Message 1 of 14 , Jan 9, 2008
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      OK so my post on hops in planters gave me some GREAT info, now I am
      pondering growing vert for about 8 feet then growing horizontal. Does
      this effect yield and should they still be trained once horizontal? My
      pergola is about 8 ft tall and 15 feet long. Also, is there a source
      of information on which rhizome grow better in partial sun vs. full sun.
    • w_hanrott
      My experience with horizontal growing was not a success. The growing tip relies on pressure from the hop pole to make it wrap around. When the tip is not in
      Message 2 of 14 , Jan 10, 2008
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        My experience with horizontal growing was not a success. The growing
        tip relies on pressure from the hop pole to make it wrap around. When
        the tip is not in contact it grows upwards until it finds something to
        support it. The outcome for my bines was like a birds nest. It's hard
        to estimate the effect on yield because it was my first year. I now
        grow using pvc plumbing pipe in 12+ foot lengths. It's not attractive,
        but it works reasonably well provided the wind doesn't blow the stems
        off the pole.



        --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, "Walter" <walterdanver@...> wrote:
        >
        > OK so my post on hops in planters gave me some GREAT info, now I am
        > pondering growing vert for about 8 feet then growing horizontal. Does
        > this effect yield and should they still be trained once horizontal? My
        > pergola is about 8 ft tall and 15 feet long. Also, is there a source
        > of information on which rhizome grow better in partial sun vs. full sun.
        >
      • cheezydemon2
        ... When the tip is not in contact it grows upwards until it finds something to support it. The outcome for my bines was like a birds nest. It s hard to
        Message 3 of 14 , Jan 10, 2008
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          --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, "w_hanrott" <w_hanrott@...> wrote:
          >
          > My experience with horizontal growing was not a success. The growing
          > tip relies on pressure from the hop pole to make it wrap around.
          When> the tip is not in contact it grows upwards until it finds something to> support it. The outcome for my bines was like a birds nest. It's hard> to estimate the effect on yield because it was my first year. I now> grow using pvc plumbing pipe in 12+ foot lengths. It's not attractive,> but it works reasonably well provided the wind doesn't blow the stems> off the pole.

          Do hop bines grow only from the stem tip, or do they send
          out "branches" or side shoots?

          I was wondering, because I have seen a technique with other plants
          where the main stem is trained horizontally, maybe a foot off of the
          groud, for 10 feet or so and then the growing tip is cut. The plant
          then sends up shoots all along the main stem that then grow
          vertically. This technique would make sense for chain link fence
          growers.
          >
        • tgfoitwoods
          Although I m a rankest newby, I raised 2 Tettnanger hills last year, and did it (mostly) horizontally. The horizontal wires were about 6 off the ground, and I
          Message 4 of 14 , Jan 11, 2008
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            Although I'm a rankest newby, I raised 2 Tettnanger hills last year,
            and did it (mostly) horizontally. The horizontal wires were about 6'
            off the ground, and I had a steep diagonal wire guiding bines from the
            hill to the horizontal wire. The bines grew very nicely and orderly
            along the horizontal wires, and the total bine length was 12-14'. I
            got about 4 oz (dried) at harvest time (after that traumatic
            wife-turning-on-the-oven-with-drying-hops incident..8(), and I had
            *no* "birdnesting" at all.

            Of course, during the growing season I fussed at the plants a bit, and
            I *may* have occasionally twirled a bine tip around the wire to keep
            it pointed straight.

            I'm planning on doing everything that same way this year.

            --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, "w_hanrott" <w_hanrott@...> wrote:
            >
            > My experience with horizontal growing was not a success. The growing
            > tip relies on pressure from the hop pole to make it wrap around. When
            > the tip is not in contact it grows upwards until it finds something to
            > support it. The outcome for my bines was like a birds nest. It's hard
            > to estimate the effect on yield because it was my first year. I now
            > grow using pvc plumbing pipe in 12+ foot lengths. It's not attractive,
            > but it works reasonably well provided the wind doesn't blow the stems
            > off the pole.
            >
            >
            >
            ----snip----
          • cheezydemon2
            Rank Newbie +1, I have seen other plants grown horizontally, maybe a foot off of the ground for 10 feet or so, and then the growing tip is cut, allowing
            Message 5 of 14 , Jan 11, 2008
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              Rank Newbie +1, I have seen other plants grown horizontally, maybe a
              foot off of the ground for 10 feet or so, and then the growing tip is
              cut, allowing "branches" to grow up all along the main stalk. This
              method would be good for chain link fence growers if it would work
              with hops.
              --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <bob@...> wrote:
              >
              > Although I'm a rankest newby, I raised 2 Tettnanger hills last year,
              > and did it (mostly) horizontally. The horizontal wires were about 6'
              > off the ground, and I had a steep diagonal wire guiding bines from
              the
              > hill to the horizontal wire. The bines grew very nicely and orderly
              > along the horizontal wires, and the total bine length was 12-14'. I
              > got about 4 oz (dried) at harvest time (after that traumatic
              > wife-turning-on-the-oven-with-drying-hops incident..8(), and I had
              > *no* "birdnesting" at all.
              >
              > Of course, during the growing season I fussed at the plants a bit,
              and
              > I *may* have occasionally twirled a bine tip around the wire to keep
              > it pointed straight.
              >
              > I'm planning on doing everything that same way this year.
              >
              > --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, "w_hanrott" <w_hanrott@> wrote:
              > >
              > > My experience with horizontal growing was not a success. The
              growing
              > > tip relies on pressure from the hop pole to make it wrap around.
              When
              > > the tip is not in contact it grows upwards until it finds
              something to
              > > support it. The outcome for my bines was like a birds nest. It's
              hard
              > > to estimate the effect on yield because it was my first year. I
              now
              > > grow using pvc plumbing pipe in 12+ foot lengths. It's not
              attractive,
              > > but it works reasonably well provided the wind doesn't blow the
              stems
              > > off the pole.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > ----snip----
              >
            • Bill Velek
              ... How much do the laterals then grow, vertically? Has anyone tried this yet? My laterals never seemed to be more than a couple of feet, IIRC, but then
              Message 6 of 14 , Jan 11, 2008
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                cheezydemon2 wrote:

                > Rank Newbie +1, I have seen other plants grown horizontally, maybe a
                > foot off of the ground for 10 feet or so, and then the growing tip is
                > cut, allowing "branches" to grow up all along the main stalk. This
                > method would be good for chain link fence growers if it would work
                > with hops.

                How much do the laterals then grow, vertically? Has anyone tried this
                yet? My laterals never seemed to be more than a couple of feet, IIRC,
                but then again my main bines still had tips and were still growing and
                drawing strength from the plant.

                As for chain link fence, I suppose folks might want to use an existing
                fence if they have no other real options, but my suspicions prompt me to
                caution newbies to not build a trellis using chainlink or welded-wire
                fence, and to not use an existing fence if you have the room and money
                to build a separate support structure. Just my two cents on the subject.

                First, I _suspect_ that pulling the bines off of the fence _might_ be a
                big pain in the butt; I can't say for sure because I've removed and
                composted my old bines, so I don't know how brittle they might become
                and perhaps they will break off easily, but it still could be a chore.

                Second, at harvest time here in Arkansas, it was so hot and humid that
                even cold beers weren't helping me through the task, so I decided to cut
                my bines down one at a time, fold them into big tub, and bring them into
                the air conditioned house where I could pick the cones. It literally
                took hours and hours to finish harvesting the cones, so it was one of
                the best decisions I ever made; that won't be possible if your bines are
                all intertwined in a chainlink fence.

                Cheers.

                Bill Velek
              • cheezydemon2
                I am planning on doing some experimenting. I have 5 rhizomes coming (was something said about a free rhizome from here? wink wink, nudge nudge)I will grow at
                Message 7 of 14 , Jan 11, 2008
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                  I am planning on doing some experimenting. I have 5 rhizomes coming
                  (was something said about a free rhizome from here? wink wink, nudge
                  nudge)I will grow at least one that way just to see how it works. And
                  yes, I was lucky to get a 40 ft stretch of chain link to grow on and
                  nothing else. I am banking that it will be cool enough in September
                  here in Kentucky (louisville) to be OK for some outside labor of love.
                  I will take notes!
                  --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, Bill Velek <billvelek@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > cheezydemon2 wrote:
                  >
                  > > Rank Newbie +1, I have seen other plants grown horizontally,
                  maybe a
                  > > foot off of the ground for 10 feet or so, and then the growing
                  tip is
                  > > cut, allowing "branches" to grow up all along the main stalk. This
                  > > method would be good for chain link fence growers if it would work
                  > > with hops.
                  >
                  > How much do the laterals then grow, vertically? Has anyone tried
                  this
                  > yet? My laterals never seemed to be more than a couple of feet,
                  IIRC,
                  > but then again my main bines still had tips and were still growing
                  and
                  > drawing strength from the plant.
                  >
                  > As for chain link fence, I suppose folks might want to use an
                  existing
                  > fence if they have no other real options, but my suspicions prompt
                  me to
                  > caution newbies to not build a trellis using chainlink or welded-
                  wire
                  > fence, and to not use an existing fence if you have the room and
                  money
                  > to build a separate support structure. Just my two cents on the
                  subject.
                  >
                  > First, I _suspect_ that pulling the bines off of the fence _might_
                  be a
                  > big pain in the butt; I can't say for sure because I've removed and
                  > composted my old bines, so I don't know how brittle they might
                  become
                  > and perhaps they will break off easily, but it still could be a
                  chore.
                  >
                  > Second, at harvest time here in Arkansas, it was so hot and humid
                  that
                  > even cold beers weren't helping me through the task, so I decided
                  to cut
                  > my bines down one at a time, fold them into big tub, and bring them
                  into
                  > the air conditioned house where I could pick the cones. It
                  literally
                  > took hours and hours to finish harvesting the cones, so it was one
                  of
                  > the best decisions I ever made; that won't be possible if your
                  bines are
                  > all intertwined in a chainlink fence.
                  >
                  > Cheers.
                  >
                  > Bill Velek
                  >
                • denimglen
                  To grow them horizontal I would recomend the horizontal trellis no higher than eye level. I m only on my first season and first plant but I found that they
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jan 11, 2008
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                    To grow them horizontal I would recomend the horizontal trellis no
                    higher than eye level. I'm only on my first season and first plant
                    but I found that they require a lot of training when they come to the
                    horizontal, so you'd want to be able to easily reach the trellis to
                    help it along.

                    I'll agree with w_hanrott, the tips will grow vertically and start to
                    twist around each other, if you have the time though (usually 10
                    minutes for one plant for me at the moment) you can gently wrap them
                    around the trellis and they will stay and tighten up.

                    On the subject of laterals, when my main stem snapped off at the top
                    (about 5' high at this point) it started sending out a lot of
                    laterals, some of them grew probably over 5' themselves untrained. I
                    started to train 3 of the laterals across my horizontal trellis and
                    they have grown to about 10' feet or so with training (will post
                    pictures soon). I've also started 'roughly' training the other
                    laterals along the horizontal because they were getting out of
                    control. I think the extensive lateral growth may be from the stem
                    being snapped.

                    cheezydemon2, from what I've seen with my plant your idea could work well.

                    Another thing I don't like about the horizontal is that even with
                    extremely careful manual training the tips still seem to break quite
                    easily. I've broken about 4 - 5 so far, luckily I've still managed a
                    lot of good growth.

                    Also as a side note, I did a small experiment with diagonal growing.
                    I had a cutting in a small-medium sized pot, once it grew about 1' I
                    tied a string to the top of stick that was supporting the plant and
                    tied it again to a hook on the side of my house. The string is at
                    about 45deg. They still don't want to grow along it without
                    assistance, but once given a helping hand (like the horizontals) it
                    seems to grab and slowely tighten up.

                    So yeah, HTH, and I do have limited experience - one plant halfway
                    through one season - so you should probably take all that with a grain
                    of salt :-)

                    Cheers,

                    Glen.
                  • cheezydemon2
                    I was planning to grow it horizontally by letting it grow up a 10 foot pole, and then lowering that gently to a horizontal position. Of course, that may risk
                    Message 9 of 14 , Jan 11, 2008
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                      I was planning to grow it horizontally by letting it grow up a 10
                      foot pole, and then lowering that gently to a horizontal position. Of
                      course, that may risk breaking off the whole plant! But I think it
                      would work.
                      --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, "denimglen" <glensimp@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > To grow them horizontal I would recomend the horizontal trellis no
                      > higher than eye level. I'm only on my first season and first plant
                      > but I found that they require a lot of training when they come to
                      the
                      > horizontal, so you'd want to be able to easily reach the trellis to
                      > help it along.
                      >
                      > I'll agree with w_hanrott, the tips will grow vertically and start
                      to
                      > twist around each other, if you have the time though (usually 10
                      > minutes for one plant for me at the moment) you can gently wrap them
                      > around the trellis and they will stay and tighten up.
                      >
                      > On the subject of laterals, when my main stem snapped off at the top
                      > (about 5' high at this point) it started sending out a lot of
                      > laterals, some of them grew probably over 5' themselves untrained.
                      I
                      > started to train 3 of the laterals across my horizontal trellis and
                      > they have grown to about 10' feet or so with training (will post
                      > pictures soon). I've also started 'roughly' training the other
                      > laterals along the horizontal because they were getting out of
                      > control. I think the extensive lateral growth may be from the stem
                      > being snapped.
                      >
                      > cheezydemon2, from what I've seen with my plant your idea could
                      work well.
                      >
                      > Another thing I don't like about the horizontal is that even with
                      > extremely careful manual training the tips still seem to break quite
                      > easily. I've broken about 4 - 5 so far, luckily I've still managed
                      a
                      > lot of good growth.
                      >
                      > Also as a side note, I did a small experiment with diagonal
                      growing.
                      > I had a cutting in a small-medium sized pot, once it grew about 1' I
                      > tied a string to the top of stick that was supporting the plant and
                      > tied it again to a hook on the side of my house. The string is at
                      > about 45deg. They still don't want to grow along it without
                      > assistance, but once given a helping hand (like the horizontals) it
                      > seems to grab and slowely tighten up.
                      >
                      > So yeah, HTH, and I do have limited experience - one plant halfway
                      > through one season - so you should probably take all that with a
                      grain
                      > of salt :-)
                      >
                      > Cheers,
                      >
                      > Glen.
                      >
                    • Bill Velek
                      ... Free rhizomes will obviously be based on available supply. Because of the huge number of newbies, I have no idea how that will play out now. There have
                      Message 10 of 14 , Jan 11, 2008
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                        cheezydemon2 wrote:

                        > I am planning on doing some experimenting. I have 5 rhizomes coming
                        > (was something said about a free rhizome from here? wink wink, nudge
                        > nudge) ...

                        Free rhizomes will obviously be based on available supply. Because of
                        the huge number of newbies, I have no idea how that will play out now.
                        There have been a couple of threads which have discussed this; I am
                        hoping that one of the volunteers will follow through with the proposed
                        central distribution point, because I don't want to be mailing dozens of
                        separate packages. I will also, I believe, help to spread the wealth
                        fairly. In other words, instead of me sending 5 rhizomes to one person,
                        and four others not getting one at all, I'd rather they each receive
                        one; on the other hand, I wouldn't want to send the first person one
                        rhizome and find out the other four received one elsewhere and then I'd
                        have four unused rhizomes going to waste at my house. Yada yada, etc.

                        > ... I will grow at least one that way just to see how it works. And
                        > yes, I was lucky to get a 40 ft stretch of chain link to grow on and
                        > nothing else. ...

                        Well, we use what we can. It if turns out to be a problem, you might
                        see if there is some practical way to run supports up to a point a
                        couple of feet higher than the chain link, and then run a horizontal
                        support along that and try to train the main bines along it.

                        > ... I am banking that it will be cool enough in September
                        > here in Kentucky (louisville) to be OK for some outside labor of love.
                        > I will take notes!

                        The problem is that you need to harvest the cones before they get too
                        dried out and turn brown. For me here in Arkansas, I had to harvest in
                        early August, at the height of the heat and humidity; I might have even
                        waited a week too long as it was, with quite a few cones already turned
                        brown. I would have loved for it to wait until September and cooler
                        weather, which is really what I _expected_. Some of that might have
                        been due to the variety I have; others might wait until later, but I
                        don't know enough about that yet to know which ones will do so.

                        Cheers.

                        Bill Velek
                      • cheezydemon2
                        Sorry! I was not serious. You don t owe me anything! Thanks. ... coming ... nudge ... of ... now. ... proposed ... dozens of ... wealth ... person, ... receive
                        Message 11 of 14 , Jan 11, 2008
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                          Sorry! I was not serious. You don't owe me anything! Thanks.
                          --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, Bill Velek <billvelek@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > cheezydemon2 wrote:
                          >
                          > > I am planning on doing some experimenting. I have 5 rhizomes
                          coming
                          > > (was something said about a free rhizome from here? wink wink,
                          nudge
                          > > nudge) ...
                          >
                          > Free rhizomes will obviously be based on available supply. Because
                          of
                          > the huge number of newbies, I have no idea how that will play out
                          now.
                          > There have been a couple of threads which have discussed this; I am
                          > hoping that one of the volunteers will follow through with the
                          proposed
                          > central distribution point, because I don't want to be mailing
                          dozens of
                          > separate packages. I will also, I believe, help to spread the
                          wealth
                          > fairly. In other words, instead of me sending 5 rhizomes to one
                          person,
                          > and four others not getting one at all, I'd rather they each
                          receive
                          > one; on the other hand, I wouldn't want to send the first person
                          one
                          > rhizome and find out the other four received one elsewhere and then
                          I'd
                          > have four unused rhizomes going to waste at my house. Yada yada,
                          etc.
                          >
                          > > ... I will grow at least one that way just to see how it works.
                          And
                          > > yes, I was lucky to get a 40 ft stretch of chain link to grow on
                          and
                          > > nothing else. ...
                          >
                          > Well, we use what we can. It if turns out to be a problem, you
                          might
                          > see if there is some practical way to run supports up to a point a
                          > couple of feet higher than the chain link, and then run a
                          horizontal
                          > support along that and try to train the main bines along it.
                          >
                          > > ... I am banking that it will be cool enough in September
                          > > here in Kentucky (louisville) to be OK for some outside labor of
                          love.
                          > > I will take notes!
                          >
                          > The problem is that you need to harvest the cones before they get
                          too
                          > dried out and turn brown. For me here in Arkansas, I had to
                          harvest in
                          > early August, at the height of the heat and humidity; I might have
                          even
                          > waited a week too long as it was, with quite a few cones already
                          turned
                          > brown. I would have loved for it to wait until September and
                          cooler
                          > weather, which is really what I _expected_. Some of that might
                          have
                          > been due to the variety I have; others might wait until later, but
                          I
                          > don't know enough about that yet to know which ones will do so.
                          >
                          > Cheers.
                          >
                          > Bill Velek
                          >
                        • James Payne
                          My 1st post to the group. A newbie here : I have been growing my hops horizontally on a 4 high chainlink fence for the past 4 yrs. 1 cascade and 1 willamette
                          Message 12 of 14 , Jan 11, 2008
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                            My 1st post to the group. A newbie here :

                            I have been growing my hops horizontally on a 4' high chainlink fence
                            for the past 4 yrs. 1 cascade and 1 willamette each on different sides
                            of the yard. I allow 10-12 of the strongest bines to grow thru the
                            weave until they reach the top bar of the fence 4' from the ground.
                            They want to grow vertically so every few days I have to gently bend
                            hem down and then tie them off to the top bar using jute twine. Then a
                            few days later I just tie them down, farther down the fence line. I
                            run about 1/2 of the bines in each direction. By the end of June the
                            main stems stop growing and the side laterals are mostly formed or
                            forming. Ocassionally I will break off a growing tip and that bine
                            will stop growing at that point but the laterals on that bine will
                            still produce. Thats why I allow a few more bines than recommended
                            grow to make up for an occasional mishap on my part.

                            So I end up with about a 40' long 4' high wall of hops by the end of
                            summer. 20' or so in each direction the laterals fill in most of the
                            space above and below the main bines.

                            Harvesting is a breeze.I set my bucket on the ground and dont have to
                            reach for the cones. Just walk along the fence picking as I go.

                            After harvest I give them some fertilizer and leave them go until the
                            1st frost kills the top growth. Takes me less than 1hr each to snip
                            the strings and pull the whole mess off the fence and compost the
                            whole works. Hand held snippers work very well.

                            Somewhat of a pain to train them this way, but since I also have a
                            veggie garden out back I am usually out there most days anyway and it
                            only takes a few min. to tie them off. They do want to grow vertical
                            at the tie off spots and get twisted together. Just gently unwrap them
                            and tie the whole mass down farther down the line.

                            I might have some pics laying around someplace.

                            Just my 2 cents,
                            Jim Payne



                            --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, "Walter" <walterdanver@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > OK so my post on hops in planters gave me some GREAT info, now I am
                            > pondering growing vert for about 8 feet then growing horizontal. Does
                            > this effect yield and should they still be trained once horizontal?
                            My
                            > pergola is about 8 ft tall and 15 feet long. Also, is there a source
                            > of information on which rhizome grow better in partial sun vs. full
                            sun.
                            >
                          • eldockoderocko
                            ... me to ... cut ... into ... are ... The advantage for me is that I have no reason to remove the bines, the cones are within reach. Then in the winter I
                            Message 13 of 14 , Jan 11, 2008
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                              --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, Bill Velek <billvelek@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > cheezydemon2 wrote:
                              >
                              > > Rank Newbie +1, I have seen other plants grown horizontally, maybe a
                              > > foot off of the ground for 10 feet or so, and then the growing tip is
                              > > cut, allowing "branches" to grow up all along the main stalk. This
                              > > method would be good for chain link fence growers if it would work
                              > > with hops.
                              >
                              > How much do the laterals then grow, vertically? Has anyone tried this
                              > yet? My laterals never seemed to be more than a couple of feet, IIRC,
                              > but then again my main bines still had tips and were still growing and
                              > drawing strength from the plant.
                              >
                              > As for chain link fence, I suppose folks might want to use an existing
                              > fence if they have no other real options, but my suspicions prompt
                              me to
                              > caution newbies to not build a trellis using chainlink or welded-wire
                              > fence, and to not use an existing fence if you have the room and money
                              > to build a separate support structure. Just my two cents on the subject.
                              >
                              > First, I _suspect_ that pulling the bines off of the fence _might_ be a
                              > big pain in the butt; I can't say for sure because I've removed and
                              > composted my old bines, so I don't know how brittle they might become
                              > and perhaps they will break off easily, but it still could be a chore.
                              >
                              > Second, at harvest time here in Arkansas, it was so hot and humid that
                              > even cold beers weren't helping me through the task, so I decided to
                              cut
                              > my bines down one at a time, fold them into big tub, and bring them
                              into
                              > the air conditioned house where I could pick the cones. It literally
                              > took hours and hours to finish harvesting the cones, so it was one of
                              > the best decisions I ever made; that won't be possible if your bines
                              are
                              > all intertwined in a chainlink fence.
                              >
                              > Cheers.
                              >
                              > Bill Velek
                              >
                              The advantage for me is that I have no reason to remove the bines, the
                              cones are within reach. Then in the winter I take a small torch and
                              burn the old bines after they dry out. Of course it's not humid where
                              I live but my 3 chainlink Cascades did great, the cones were bigger
                              and they were so much easier to harvest. And I could drink while I
                              picked, no worries bout falling off a ladder and not being found for a
                              day.
                            • Bill Velek
                              James Payne wrote: snipped an excellent description of growing hops on a chainlink fence ... snip In a previous post, I expressed doubts as to the wisdom of
                              Message 14 of 14 , Jan 11, 2008
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                                James Payne wrote:

                                snipped an excellent description of growing hops on a chainlink fence

                                > Harvesting is a breeze.I set my bucket on the ground and dont have to
                                > reach for the cones. Just walk along the fence picking as I go.

                                snip

                                In a previous post, I expressed doubts as to the wisdom of using a
                                chainlink fence based partially on the assumption that it would be
                                difficult to remove the bines; I now stand corrected on that point, and
                                as long as you don't mind harvesting outside, a chainlink fence is
                                apparently a good option. But my second point still bears consideration.

                                I had to harvest in August when temps approached 100F (38C), and with
                                our high humidity the sweat was just rolling off of me; picking was not
                                much of an effort in itself because I cut the bine down from the trellis
                                and laid it on a sheet in the shade, sat in a comfortable chair with a
                                cold beer, and started picking cones. That was no doubt even easier
                                than walking along a fence, but ... as I said ... the sweat was rolling
                                off of me. My shirt was getting soaked, and it just wasn't any "fun" at
                                all. After I picked that first bine, I decide to do the rest by folding
                                the bines into a large tub, taking one at a time into the house to pick
                                in the air conditioning. Call me a "wus", baby, candy-ass, or whatever,
                                but at least I picked in comfort. If you have the sort of weather that
                                I've just described, keep in mind what you will face if you can't bring
                                your bines inside, and that there probably isn't any way possible to do
                                that if you grow them on a chainlink fence. I realize that some folks
                                don't have a choice; my advice is aimed at those who do.

                                Cheers.

                                Bill Velek
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