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RE: RE: Separating Cascade from Centennials

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  • michaelftalbot
    Last year I had a similar mess, just bagged them and called them house hops, the mix in my case was Cascade and Centennial. Made a couple fine IPA s, used 1
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 9, 2013
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      Last year I had a similar mess, just bagged them and called them house hops, the mix in my case was Cascade and Centennial.  Made a couple fine IPA's, used 1 ounce at beginning of boil, 1 ounce at 30 minutes and 1 ounce at 15 minutes left to boil, in a 1.056 Starting Gravity, 5 gallon batch.



      --- In grow-hops@yahoogroups.com, <tchickosky@...> wrote:

      Not a perfect system, but you can go by hop cone formation.  The Centennials should be long and skinny (cyllindrical) whereas the Cascade should be a little more cone like with a taper from end to end.  As I said, FAR from perfect, but may help.  Alternatively, they should work well in a beer together and you could just use them as a mix...



      --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, <grow-hops@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

      I have a Cascade plant and a Centennial plant that have grown together and created a huge glob of hop matter.  No way to know where one ends and the other starts (I got the bines from another grower who grew them that way and chopped them down together and gave them to me, not my doing).  How can I tell them apart?  I was able to separate the Chinook from the Willamette and Galena easily, but the Cascade and Centennial is a little more difficult.  Any particular tips?  Smell is hard since they are so close.

      Thanks,
    • t2000kwt
      If you want to separate them, you ll have to trace the bines down to the rhizome and separate them there, cutting out rhizomes and labeling them, then planting
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 10, 2013
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        If you want to separate them, you'll have to trace the bines down to
        the rhizome and separate them there, cutting out rhizomes and labeling
        them, then planting them somewhere else while you destroy the rest
        with Roundup or some other weed killer. I doubt you could do a
        thorough enough job of getting rid of everything left by roto-tilling
        and then pulling them all out by hand.

        If you're careful enough, you'll have enough left standing after you
        remove, lablel, and re-plant the ones you identify that you can do it
        all this year before they die back to the ground. And if you wait a
        few weeks, depending on what weed killer you choose to use, you can
        replant your marked rhizomes. Just keep them well separated and
        occasionally roto-till between them and rake out everything ripped up
        unless they're really far apart.

        Donald

        On 07 Sep 2013 13:16:30 -0700, <tchickosky@...> wrote:

        >Not a perfect system, but you can go by hop cone formation. The Centennials should be long and skinny (cyllindrical) whereas the Cascade should be a little more cone like with a taper from end to end. As I said, FAR from perfect, but may help. Alternatively, they should work well in a beer together and you could just use them as a mix...
        >
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