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Re: [Grow-Hops] drying hops with food dehydrator

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  • Ric Cunningham
    Yes you will notice a difference if you had overly dried or toasted hops. I tried a food dehydrator my first year of harvesting with poor results that took far
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 26, 2013
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      Yes you will notice a difference if you had overly dried or toasted hops.
       
      I tried a food dehydrator my first year of harvesting with poor results that took far too long. I was harvesting up to 20 pounds wet. I built an oast from a garbage picked dresser on the side of the road and it worked great. Definitely need a vacuum sealer for long term storage.


      On Mon, Aug 26, 2013 at 3:45 PM, Doug Rooney <drooney57@...> wrote:
       

      Personally I put the hops in a heavy paper grocery sack, 1 pound wet, and then put it on top of my gas water heater in my laundry room.

      Within a day or 2 they are dry and ready for vacuum sealing.

      Of course YMMV

       

      ~Dr.Doug

       

      From: Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of ohwenzelph
      Sent: Monday, August 26, 2013 12:28 PM
      To: Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Grow-Hops] drying hops with food dehydrator

       

       

      i have a food dehydrator but it seems it might be a little bit too hot.

      it drys the cones but some of them look like they get a little toasted around the edges.

      will this be a problem when brewing?

      thanks




      --
      US Navy - 100% on watch
    • jwright@growinhydro.com
      I use framed window screens, like the ones in your storm windows, and I dry in the attic. Set your self up some boxes (I know you have them up there), and
      Message 2 of 12 , Aug 27, 2013
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        I use framed window screens, like the ones in your storm windows, and I dry in the attic.  Set your self up some boxes (I know you have them up there), and span them apart so that the screens have a box on either side to suspend it.  Lay out your hops to cover the screen. To process more volume, cut cardboard strips about 4" or 5" wide and tape up a frame to extend up from the screen so you can go a few inches deep on your layer.  If you lay it out 1 layer thick, your hops will be dry within a day, if you do the 3 or 4 inch thick layer, it should take a day or two, be sure to go up and stir/flip around the hops for even drying.  Your first time through, check on it every few hours during the heat of the day until you get a feel for how long the process takes.  If you have a thermometer, take it up there and make sure you are not running hotter than 140F.  Your attic can run from 30 to 50 degrees hotter than the outside temp depending on how well it is ventilated,  So if you have a good day in the 80's it is usually ideal (in my case) for drying up there.  Best of luck!  Jesse
      • Noel Curry
        Hi folks, What have I done wrong? I collected roughly 5 lbs Phoenix 10.5 alpha hops and picked them that day, got them into a large airing cupboard. Constantly
        Message 3 of 12 , Sep 5, 2013
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          Hi folks,
           
          What have I done wrong? I collected roughly 5 lbs Phoenix 10.5 alpha hops and picked them that day, got them into a large airing cupboard. Constantly warm. Hops 2-3" thick, turned every seven hours, dry within 60 hours. All turned brown. How do you get them to stay green? Much quicker drying, I guess, but how? The aromas and stickiness is still in the hops but they don't have the esthetic appeal as they do in packets!
           
          Has anyone ever tried freezing 'wet' green hops and dumping them straight into the copper months later from the freezer?
           
          Noel, Scotland.
        • James Altwies
          Noel You do not have enough airflow. Hops must be dried down to less than 40% moisture content within the first 8 hours after harvest. If you had them stacked
          Message 4 of 12 , Sep 5, 2013
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            Noel
               You do not have enough airflow. Hops must be dried down to less than 40% moisture content within the first 8 hours after harvest. If you had them stacked 3 inches deep with no airflow and hot air they oxidized. Moisture must be removed from the system somehow. Hops spread out completely flat 1 cone deep can make use of a simple fan moving air across the cone surface. If you pile them deeper than 2 cones deep you need to force air through the stack. Determining fan size is a whole different matter altogether. 

            Kindly
            James

            Sent from my iPod

            On Sep 5, 2013, at 3:18 PM, Noel Curry <noeljcurry1@...> wrote:

             

            Hi folks,
             
            What have I done wrong? I collected roughly 5 lbs Phoenix 10.5 alpha hops and picked them that day, got them into a large airing cupboard. Constantly warm. Hops 2-3" thick, turned every seven hours, dry within 60 hours. All turned brown. How do you get them to stay green? Much quicker drying, I guess, but how? The aromas and stickiness is still in the hops but they don't have the esthetic appeal as they do in packets!
             
            Has anyone ever tried freezing 'wet' green hops and dumping them straight into the copper months later from the freezer?
             
            Noel, Scotland.

          • tchickosky
            Noel, I ve been looking into freezing wet hops recently myself as the wet hop order deliveries are unpredictable and I work night shift. The general consensus
            Message 5 of 12 , Sep 6, 2013
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              Noel,


              I've been looking into freezing wet hops recently myself as the wet hop order deliveries are unpredictable and I work night shift.  The general consensus is to not do it, but I did find this thread on Homebrewtalk.com where both sides are debated and spoken for.  http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f92/wet-hops-storage-189761/


              One thing I have heard universally is to add them at the end of the boil or as a whirlpool/hop stand to kill off anything that may be growing on them.



              --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, <grow-hops@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

              Hi folks,
               
              What have I done wrong? I collected roughly 5 lbs Phoenix 10.5 alpha hops and picked them that day, got them into a large airing cupboard. Constantly warm. Hops 2-3" thick, turned every seven hours, dry within 60 hours. All turned brown. How do you get them to stay green? Much quicker drying, I guess, but how? The aromas and stickiness is still in the hops but they don't have the esthetic appeal as they do in packets!
               
              Has anyone ever tried freezing 'wet' green hops and dumping them straight into the copper months later from the freezer?
               
              Noel, Scotland.
            • pergion8
              I have tried to freeze fresh harvested Chinook hops without drying them first. I used the food saver vacuum bag approach. When I pulled some out of the freezer
              Message 6 of 12 , Sep 6, 2013
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                I have tried to freeze fresh harvested Chinook hops without drying them first.  I used the food saver vacuum bag approach.  When I pulled some out of the freezer and thawed them for use, I noticed that the citrous/pine like aroma was replaced with a sweet tea/grassy aroma.  They had a wet/darker green appearance even after drying them.  I ended up not using them.  I make sure to dry them now, unless I have a boil going the day I pick them and can use right away.



                --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, <grow-hops@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                Noel,


                I've been looking into freezing wet hops recently myself as the wet hop order deliveries are unpredictable and I work night shift.  The general consensus is to not do it, but I did find this thread on Homebrewtalk.com where both sides are debated and spoken for.  http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f92/wet-hops-storage-189761/


                One thing I have heard universally is to add them at the end of the boil or as a whirlpool/hop stand to kill off anything that may be growing on them.



                --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, <grow-hops@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                Hi folks,
                 
                What have I done wrong? I collected roughly 5 lbs Phoenix 10.5 alpha hops and picked them that day, got them into a large airing cupboard. Constantly warm. Hops 2-3" thick, turned every seven hours, dry within 60 hours. All turned brown. How do you get them to stay green? Much quicker drying, I guess, but how? The aromas and stickiness is still in the hops but they don't have the esthetic appeal as they do in packets!
                 
                Has anyone ever tried freezing 'wet' green hops and dumping them straight into the copper months later from the freezer?
                 
                Noel, Scotland.
              • pergion8
                I use some simple frames with window screen and lay the hops out in the manner James suggests. I place a box fan (Low speed) about a foot or so under the laid
                Message 7 of 12 , Sep 6, 2013
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                  I use some simple frames with window screen and lay the hops out in the manner James suggests.  I place a box fan (Low speed) about a foot or so under the laid out cones on the frame and they dry pretty well.  I usually dry them in the basement at an ambient of 67ºF @ 40-50% RH.  It only takes about 1-2 days to get the moisture content down.  They retain their green color, a little faded, but no browning as far as I could tell.

                   



                  --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, <grow-hops@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                  Noel
                     You do not have enough airflow. Hops must be dried down to less than 40% moisture content within the first 8 hours after harvest. If you had them stacked 3 inches deep with no airflow and hot air they oxidized. Moisture must be removed from the system somehow. Hops spread out completely flat 1 cone deep can make use of a simple fan moving air across the cone surface. If you pile them deeper than 2 cones deep you need to force air through the stack. Determining fan size is a whole different matter altogether. 

                  Kindly
                  James

                  Sent from my iPod

                  On Sep 5, 2013, at 3:18 PM, Noel Curry <noeljcurry1@...> wrote:

                   

                  Hi folks,
                   
                  What have I done wrong? I collected roughly 5 lbs Phoenix 10.5 alpha hops and picked them that day, got them into a large airing cupboard. Constantly warm. Hops 2-3" thick, turned every seven hours, dry within 60 hours. All turned brown. How do you get them to stay green? Much quicker drying, I guess, but how? The aromas and stickiness is still in the hops but they don't have the esthetic appeal as they do in packets!
                   
                  Has anyone ever tried freezing 'wet' green hops and dumping them straight into the copper months later from the freezer?
                   
                  Noel, Scotland.
                • James Altwies
                  67F and 50%rh will get you to moisture equilibrium of about 10% (which is perfect BTW) in just the time described! Nice job... Sent from my iPod ... 67F and
                  Message 8 of 12 , Sep 6, 2013
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                    67F and 50%rh will get you to moisture equilibrium of about 10% (which is perfect BTW) in just the time described!  Nice job...

                    Sent from my iPod

                    On Sep 6, 2013, at 11:55 AM, <pergion8@...> wrote:

                     

                    I use some simple frames with window screen and lay the hops out in the manner James suggests.  I place a box fan (Low speed) about a foot or so under the laid out cones on the frame and they dry pretty well.  I usually dry them in the basement at an ambient of 67ºF @ 40-50% RH.  It only takes about 1-2 days to get the moisture content down.  They retain their green color, a little faded, but no browning as far as I could tell.

                     



                    --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, <grow-hops@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                    Noel
                       You do not have enough airflow. Hops must be dried down to less than 40% moisture content within the first 8 hours after harvest. If you had them stacked 3 inches deep with no airflow and hot air they oxidized. Moisture must be removed from the system somehow. Hops spread out completely flat 1 cone deep can make use of a simple fan moving air across the cone surface. If you pile them deeper than 2 cones deep you need to force air through the stack. Determining fan size is a whole different matter altogether. 

                    Kindly
                    James

                    Sent from my iPod

                    On Sep 5, 2013, at 3:18 PM, Noel Curry <noeljcurry1@...> wrote:

                     

                    Hi folks,
                     
                    What have I done wrong? I collected roughly 5 lbs Phoenix 10.5 alpha hops and picked them that day, got them into a large airing cupboard. Constantly warm. Hops 2-3" thick, turned every seven hours, dry within 60 hours. All turned brown. How do you get them to stay green? Much quicker drying, I guess, but how? The aromas and stickiness is still in the hops but they don't have the esthetic appeal as they do in packets!
                     
                    Has anyone ever tried freezing 'wet' green hops and dumping them straight into the copper months later from the freezer?
                     
                    Noel, Scotland.

                  • t2000kwt
                    I have used window screens in a warm garage with a shallow layer of hops (maybe no more then 2 deep) and the results were acceptable (probably not prefect). I
                    Message 9 of 12 , Sep 7, 2013
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                      I have used window screens in a warm garage with a shallow layer of
                      hops (maybe no more then 2 deep) and the results were acceptable
                      (probably not prefect).

                      I had a "window" fan blowing gently across the screen, if I remember
                      correctly. Better yet would be to have a fan UNDER them instgead,
                      blowing through the layer or two of hop cones. I don't trust a window
                      fan in the horizontal position, though, since their cheap bearings are
                      not made to hold the fan shaft vertically.

                      Commercial hop plugs would no doubt be of a higher quality, but this
                      was a great way to store them, saving a lot of space. They made
                      decent home-made hop plugs when compressed manually into a PVC pipe
                      and made some great beer, too.


                      Donald



                      On 06 Sep 2013 09:55:29 -0700, <pergion8@...> wrote:

                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >I use some simple frames with window screen and lay the hops out in the manner James suggests. I place a box fan (Low speed) about a foot or so under the laid out cones on the frame and they dry pretty well. I usually dry them in the basement at an ambient of 67ºF @ 40-50% RH. It only takes about 1-2 days to get the moisture content down. They retain their green color, a little faded, but no browning as far as I could tell.
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