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Trellis Advice

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  • bc523@ymail.com
    Hello, I have been growing Cascade and Nugget hops for three years, and I am looking for critique and advice on my support system. I have about 5-7 rhizomes
    Message 1 of 5 , May 1, 2011
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      Hello,

      I have been growing Cascade and Nugget hops for three years, and I am looking for critique and advice on my support system. I have about 5-7 rhizomes grouping in a garden along an approximately 6' tall wooden privacy fence on the north side of my backyard.

      The first year I grew the hops, I anchored twine to the top of the fence posts (~6") and then ran twine to fence posts (~7-8') on the other side of yard. However, the twine across the yard was too low for walking around in the yard and I had to come up with another plan the next year.

      Last year I screwed 5/8"x3/4" wooden vegetable stakes into the fence posts. This brought the height on the rhizome side to about 7.5-8' and around 9' on the farside. I posted pics to the Photos section of the group under Brian's Hop Garden.

      Unfortunately, the stakes did not hold up to the weight of the vines too well, and I had to spend time screwing more in to reinforce them. This year I have some long pieces of wood that are 1.75"x0.75" thick. I plan on running twine up to the top of them which should be about 10'. Hopefully these will be more stable than the 5/8"x3/4" wooden vegetable stakes.

      Thoughts? Comments? Should I run twine across to the other side of the yard or just let the vines hang from that side?

      Brian
    • Jim Sadler
      When I built mine I set up a 10 2x4 about 3 in the ground, then bolted a second 10 2x4 to it, then planted the hop plants in a circle about 6 in diameter
      Message 2 of 5 , May 1, 2011
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        When I built mine I set up a 10' 2x4 about 3' in the ground, then bolted a second 10'  2x4 to it, then planted the hop plants in a circle about 6' in diameter and ran twine up to some hooks installed on top of the 2nd board.

        Jim

        On Sun, May 1, 2011 at 12:13 PM, bc523@... <bc523@...> wrote:
         

        Hello,

        I have been growing Cascade and Nugget hops for three years, and I am looking for critique and advice on my support system. I have about 5-7 rhizomes grouping in a garden along an approximately 6' tall wooden privacy fence on the north side of my backyard.

        The first year I grew the hops, I anchored twine to the top of the fence posts (~6") and then ran twine to fence posts (~7-8') on the other side of yard. However, the twine across the yard was too low for walking around in the yard and I had to come up with another plan the next year.

        Last year I screwed 5/8"x3/4" wooden vegetable stakes into the fence posts. This brought the height on the rhizome side to about 7.5-8' and around 9' on the farside. I posted pics to the Photos section of the group under Brian's Hop Garden.

        Unfortunately, the stakes did not hold up to the weight of the vines too well, and I had to spend time screwing more in to reinforce them. This year I have some long pieces of wood that are 1.75"x0.75" thick. I plan on running twine up to the top of them which should be about 10'. Hopefully these will be more stable than the 5/8"x3/4" wooden vegetable stakes.

        Thoughts? Comments? Should I run twine across to the other side of the yard or just let the vines hang from that side?

        Brian


      • Doug Rooney
        So Jim, how do you get the twine up there the next year? From: Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jim Sadler Sent:
        Message 3 of 5 , May 1, 2011
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          So Jim, how do you get the twine up there the next year?

           

          From: Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jim Sadler
          Sent: Sunday, May 01, 2011 10:18 AM
          To: Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Grow-Hops] Trellis Advice

           

           

          When I built mine I set up a 10' 2x4 about 3' in the ground, then bolted a second 10'  2x4 to it, then planted the hop plants in a circle about 6' in diameter and ran twine up to some hooks installed on top of the 2nd board.

           

          Jim

          On Sun, May 1, 2011 at 12:13 PM, bc523@... <bc523@...> wrote:

           

          Hello,

          I have been growing Cascade and Nugget hops for three years, and I am looking for critique and advice on my support system. I have about 5-7 rhizomes grouping in a garden along an approximately 6' tall wooden privacy fence on the north side of my backyard.

          The first year I grew the hops, I anchored twine to the top of the fence posts (~6") and then ran twine to fence posts (~7-8') on the other side of yard. However, the twine across the yard was too low for walking around in the yard and I had to come up with another plan the next year.

          Last year I screwed 5/8"x3/4" wooden vegetable stakes into the fence posts. This brought the height on the rhizome side to about 7.5-8' and around 9' on the farside. I posted pics to the Photos section of the group under Brian's Hop Garden.

          Unfortunately, the stakes did not hold up to the weight of the vines too well, and I had to spend time screwing more in to reinforce them. This year I have some long pieces of wood that are 1.75"x0.75" thick. I plan on running twine up to the top of them which should be about 10'. Hopefully these will be more stable than the 5/8"x3/4" wooden vegetable stakes.

          Thoughts? Comments? Should I run twine across to the other side of the yard or just let the vines hang from that side?

          Brian

           

        • Jim Sadler
          Ideally my plan was to tie new twine to the old (I use a loop tied at ground level) and just feed it back through. Failing that I have access to a 13 foot
          Message 4 of 5 , May 1, 2011
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            Ideally my plan was to tie new twine to the old (I use a loop tied at
            ground level) and just feed it back through.

            Failing that I have access to a 13 foot stepladder or the bucket of a backhoe.

            Worst case scenario I could disassemble the upper section of the pole
            and restring it that way.

            I'm actually about to build 4-5 more when I relocate my existing
            plants to a new location next week. I'm going to split my 6 existing
            plants as well as plant six new ones.

            Jim

            On 5/1/11, Doug Rooney <drooney57@...> wrote:
            > So Jim, how do you get the twine up there the next year?
            >
            >
            >
            > From: Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
            > Of Jim Sadler
            > Sent: Sunday, May 01, 2011 10:18 AM
            > To: Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: Re: [Grow-Hops] Trellis Advice
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > When I built mine I set up a 10' 2x4 about 3' in the ground, then bolted a
            > second 10' 2x4 to it, then planted the hop plants in a circle about 6' in
            > diameter and ran twine up to some hooks installed on top of the 2nd board.
            >
            >
            >
            > Jim
            >
            > On Sun, May 1, 2011 at 12:13 PM, bc523@... <bc523@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > Hello,
            >
            > I have been growing Cascade and Nugget hops for three years, and I am
            > looking for critique and advice on my support system. I have about 5-7
            > rhizomes grouping in a garden along an approximately 6' tall wooden privacy
            > fence on the north side of my backyard.
            >
            > The first year I grew the hops, I anchored twine to the top of the fence
            > posts (~6") and then ran twine to fence posts (~7-8') on the other side of
            > yard. However, the twine across the yard was too low for walking around in
            > the yard and I had to come up with another plan the next year.
            >
            > Last year I screwed 5/8"x3/4" wooden vegetable stakes into the fence posts.
            > This brought the height on the rhizome side to about 7.5-8' and around 9' on
            > the farside. I posted pics to the Photos section of the group under Brian's
            > Hop Garden.
            >
            > Unfortunately, the stakes did not hold up to the weight of the vines too
            > well, and I had to spend time screwing more in to reinforce them. This year
            > I have some long pieces of wood that are 1.75"x0.75" thick. I plan on
            > running twine up to the top of them which should be about 10'. Hopefully
            > these will be more stable than the 5/8"x3/4" wooden vegetable stakes.
            >
            > Thoughts? Comments? Should I run twine across to the other side of the yard
            > or just let the vines hang from that side?
            >
            > Brian
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Sean
            ... When in dought go stout. I ve gone to my trellis 2.0 this year to make it easy in the off season to re twine much easier and limit the ladder time. I
            Message 5 of 5 , May 2, 2011
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              --- In Grow-Hops@yahoogroups.com, "bc523@..." <bc523@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hello,
              >
              > I have been growing Cascade and Nugget hops for three years, and I am looking for critique and advice on my support system. I have about 5-7 rhizomes grouping in a garden along an approximately 6' tall wooden privacy fence on the north side of my backyard.
              >
              > The first year I grew the hops, I anchored twine to the top of the fence posts (~6") and then ran twine to fence posts (~7-8') on the other side of yard. However, the twine across the yard was too low for walking around in the yard and I had to come up with another plan the next year.
              >
              > Last year I screwed 5/8"x3/4" wooden vegetable stakes into the fence posts. This brought the height on the rhizome side to about 7.5-8' and around 9' on the farside. I posted pics to the Photos section of the group under Brian's Hop Garden.
              >
              > Unfortunately, the stakes did not hold up to the weight of the vines too well, and I had to spend time screwing more in to reinforce them. This year I have some long pieces of wood that are 1.75"x0.75" thick. I plan on running twine up to the top of them which should be about 10'. Hopefully these will be more stable than the 5/8"x3/4" wooden vegetable stakes.
              >
              > Thoughts? Comments? Should I run twine across to the other side of the yard or just let the vines hang from that side?
              >
              > Brian
              >
              When in dought go stout. I've gone to my trellis 2.0 this year to make it easy in the off season to re twine much easier and limit the ladder time. I have 2 8' 2x4's (PT) in the ground 3-4' with a 2 diagonal supports kickers. The 2x4's in the ground are seperated by the thickness os a 2x inorder to place the 10' 2x4 between them in a bolted connection with 2 bolts. One bolt is left in while the other is place once the 10' post is swung vertical. Wires are strung between the posts on the ground ( I use a piece of EMT to use a "V" twine pattern for my bines to get better airflow through the plants. I twine to the top wire and let them hang until the 10' post has been bolted in and then the twine is tied off to the bottom wire/drip line about 6" off the ground. Ready for the bines. After harvesting and the bines cut you can drop the posts and clean off the remaining twine off the wires do any repairs and be ready for the next year.
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