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Re: New guy and first question

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  • actionhac
    Hello Tim. I am new to Milling also but I just had to do exactly what you are doing. My common sense told me too to shim between the column support angle and
    Message 1 of 18 , Apr 2, 2007
      Hello Tim.
      I am new to Milling also but I just had to do exactly what you are doing.
      My common sense told me too to shim between the column support angle
      and the base (the 3 bolt joint) in front of the bolts (my column was
      leaning towards me) but it seemed to me that this joint has such a
      small surface area and under quite a bit of stress.
      I did my shimming at the column support angle/column dovetail block
      joint, where the scale is.
      I started with 2 feeler gage sets so I would have 2 of every size. I
      placed the gages at 40deg.L and 40deg.R in the joint at the scale. I
      just used the try and test method to get my column 90deg. with my
      table. It was .005. Then I replaced the .005 feeler gages with 1" wide
      .005 brass shim stock (hobby shop) at the same two points,
      (40deg.L,40deg.R). After retesting the column and doing a sweep of the
      table I cut the shim stock off about 1/2" proud of the joint and
      folded them over towards me so it would not cover the scale and if I
      tilt the column I can keep an eye on them. I'm not sure how shimming
      here will affect using the column tilt but I don't care, I would
      rather use an angle vise etc.
      You must realize the above information is from a person that has very
      little mill experience, so there could be errors in my thinking. The
      only possible negitive I can think of with having the shims at this
      joint is the angle is not having the full load from the mating part
      distributed accross it with the shims there. If there is a problem I
      Think it could show up when doing heavy cuts.

      Robert


      --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "timbaker416" <timbaker416@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > This is my first post and I wanted to say hello to everyone. My name
      > is Tim and I live about 20 miles south of Pittsburgh Pa. I am a CNC
      > laser operator at a local fab shop.
      >
      > I have had my HF mini-mill for about a month and have been doing all
      > of the basic tune up stuff and things are going well. (I also have a
      > Cummins mini-lathe) The amount of info here is really amazing!
      > Thanks very much!
      >
      > Now for my first question. I thought I had the mill all trammed and
      > then I noticed that I was getting fairly significant swirls while
      > facing a part. I began digging around the forum and discovered John
      > Pitkins excellent write up on this subject in the files section.
      > Sure enough, my column is not perpendicular. So I am going to follow
      > his instructions and start from scratch. My question concerns the
      > shims for the fore and aft tilt. Common sense would seem to suggest
      > that they should be put under the front (or rear) of the column
      > bracket where it bolts to the base. However, as I have been acused
      > of lacking common sense from time to time I thought I had better ask!
      >
      > Thanks all,
      >
      > Tim B.
      >
    • Arnie Minear
      Tim, Welcome to the forum, I have picked up a lot of info here. I am not an expert on this but before shimming anywhere it will be important to determine
      Message 2 of 18 , Apr 3, 2007
        Tim,

        Welcome to the forum, I have picked up a lot of info here.

        I am not an expert on this but before shimming anywhere it will be
        important to determine which plane is actually off. If the spindle
        head to column is not square, you wouldn't want to shim at the column
        to base to compensate, and vis-a-versa. Exactly how you go about
        determining that I am not sure.

        It seems to me that if you place a angle block on the table with the
        face parallel to the column and indicate off of it as you move your z
        axis up and down you will be able to determine if the column is square
        to the table. If it isn't then you shim the column base to make it so.
        If it is square then you will want to shim the spindle head assembly.

        Good luck in your investigation.

        Arnie
      • timbaker416
        Hi Arnie, Thanks to everyone for the responses so far. I placed my indicator on the head casting (not the spindle) and ran the head up and down indicating off
        Message 3 of 18 , Apr 4, 2007
          Hi Arnie,

          Thanks to everyone for the responses so far.

          I placed my indicator on the head casting (not the spindle) and ran
          the head up and down indicating off of a good square clamped to the
          table. I have all of the gibs lapped and adjusted (with a little
          work, I have discovered they work quite nicely!) and also locked the
          X and Y axis before testing. No doubt the column is leaning forward.
          Left and right tilt is no problem. Since I originally shimmed the
          spindle casting, once I have the column straight, that will have to
          be re-adjusted. Anyway, the question I have is where do the shims
          go? I have thought about Roberts reply and it may be the way I'll go
          as I agree the footprint of the column bracket is not all that
          large.

          I'll ponder some more!

          Thanks,

          Tim B.
        • John Pitkin
          The shims may go under the angle bracket attaching the column to the base. Because the bracket is pretty short from front to rear, you may wish to consider
          Message 4 of 18 , Apr 4, 2007
            The shims may go under the angle bracket attaching the column to the
            base. Because the bracket is pretty short from front to rear, you may
            wish to consider scraping the bracket instead of using shims. I found
            it much easier to scrape. A little bit of adjustment on the bracket
            resulted in a large movement of the column.

            JP

            --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "timbaker416"
            <timbaker416@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Arnie,
            >
            > Thanks to everyone for the responses so far.
            >
            > I placed my indicator on the head casting (not the spindle) and ran
            > the head up and down indicating off of a good square clamped to the
            > table. I have all of the gibs lapped and adjusted (with a little
            > work, I have discovered they work quite nicely!) and also locked
            the
            > X and Y axis before testing. No doubt the column is leaning
            forward.
            > Left and right tilt is no problem. Since I originally shimmed the
            > spindle casting, once I have the column straight, that will have to
            > be re-adjusted. Anyway, the question I have is where do the shims
            > go? I have thought about Roberts reply and it may be the way I'll
            go
            > as I agree the footprint of the column bracket is not all that
            > large.
            >
            > I'll ponder some more!
            >
            > Thanks,
            >
            > Tim B.
            >
          • timbaker416
            ... may ... found ... Thanks John, I was also concerned with the small footprint. Looks like I ll be busy tomorow! Tim B.
            Message 5 of 18 , Apr 5, 2007
              --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "John Pitkin"
              <cedarcreekranch@...> wrote:
              >
              > The shims may go under the angle bracket attaching the column to the
              > base. Because the bracket is pretty short from front to rear, you
              may
              > wish to consider scraping the bracket instead of using shims. I
              found
              > it much easier to scrape. A little bit of adjustment on the bracket
              > resulted in a large movement of the column.
              >
              > JP
              >


              Thanks John, I was also concerned with the small footprint. Looks like
              I'll be busy tomorow!

              Tim B.
            • whoafat
              I am also new here with a weeks-old mini requiring tuneup. I have very little recent experience in this area. However, the scraping solution sound appealing
              Message 6 of 18 , Apr 5, 2007
                I am also new here with a weeks-old mini requiring tuneup. I have
                very little recent experience in this area. However, the scraping
                solution sound appealing but I am afraid that I will have to do a lot
                more research regarding the almost forgatton art of metal scraping.
                I'll keep tracking this threat to see if some of the more seasoned
                group members will expand on the art of scraping as it pertains to
                the min lathe. Sorry for the intrusion,
                wilfred
                --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "timbaker416"
                <timbaker416@...> wrote:
                >
                > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "John Pitkin"
                > <cedarcreekranch@> wrote:
                > >
                > > The shims may go under the angle bracket attaching the column to
                the
                > > base. Because the bracket is pretty short from front to rear, you
                > may
                > > wish to consider scraping the bracket instead of using shims. I
                > found
                > > it much easier to scrape. A little bit of adjustment on the
                bracket
                > > resulted in a large movement of the column.
                > >
                > > JP
                > >
                >
                >
                > Thanks John, I was also concerned with the small footprint. Looks
                like
                > I'll be busy tomorow!
                >
                > Tim B.
                >
              • Gary Harper
                Hi. Does anyone have a good source for M2 fluteless taps? Also looking for M2 countersunk stainless steel screws with allen key heads. I need these for some
                Message 7 of 18 , Apr 5, 2007

                  Hi.  Does anyone have a good source for M2 fluteless taps?  Also looking for M2 countersunk stainless steel screws with allen key heads.  I need these for some optics work I am doing.  Thanks.

                   

                  From: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of whoafat
                  Sent: Thursday, April 05, 2007 4:03 PM
                  To: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [GrizHFMinimill] Re: New guy and first question

                   

                  I am also new here with a weeks-old mini requiring tuneup. I have
                  very little recent experience in this area. However, the scraping
                  solution sound appealing but I am afraid that I will have to do a lot
                  more research regarding the almost forgatton art of metal scraping.
                  I'll keep tracking this threat to see if some of the more seasoned
                  group members will expand on the art of scraping as it pertains to
                  the min lathe. Sorry for the intrusion,
                  wilfred
                  --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "timbaker416"
                  <timbaker416@...> wrote:

                  >
                  > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com,
                  "John Pitkin"
                  > <cedarcreekranch@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > The shims may go under the angle bracket attaching the column to
                  the
                  > > base. Because the bracket is pretty short from front to rear, you
                  > may
                  > > wish to consider scraping the bracket instead of using shims. I
                  > found
                  > > it much easier to scrape. A little bit of adjustment on the
                  bracket
                  > > resulted in a large movement of the column.
                  > >
                  > > JP
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  > Thanks John, I was also concerned with the small footprint. Looks
                  like
                  > I'll be busy tomorow!
                  >
                  > Tim B.
                  >

                • John Pitkin
                  There are two methods of scraping. 1. The scraper is held nearly vertical and the sharp end is dragged across the base metal in very short strokes. Sort of
                  Message 8 of 18 , Apr 5, 2007
                    There are two methods of scraping.

                    1. The scraper is held nearly vertical and the sharp end is dragged
                    across the base metal in very short strokes. Sort of like picking at
                    a scab or fingernails on a blackboard. Tiny bits and curls of metal
                    will come off the base with each stroke. It takes LOTS of chips over
                    an area to reduce the surface. That's good. It means you go very
                    slowly so you don't ruin the base material.



                    2. A scraper is held at a very low angle and the sharp end is chipped
                    into the surface like chiseling wood or chipping paint. The scraper
                    will dig into the surface taking a deeper cut. It leaves a lousy
                    looking finish, too. But it's one way to get more material off if you
                    have a lot of metal to remove. Then return to method #1 to smooth
                    things as you get close to finish.

                    Scraping is much like filing with one giant tooth file. The
                    difference is a file has a tendency to remove material from the
                    perimeter of a surface. A scraper can remove material from the center
                    area of a surface.

                    It's not a lost art, and it's really pretty simple to learn. Try it
                    on wood, first, to get the hang of it.

                    John Pitkin

                    --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "whoafat" <whoafat@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I am also new here with a weeks-old mini requiring tuneup. I have
                    > very little recent experience in this area. However, the scraping
                    > solution sound appealing but I am afraid that I will have to do a
                    lot
                    > more research regarding the almost forgatton art of metal scraping.
                    > I'll keep tracking this threat to see if some of the more seasoned
                    > group members will expand on the art of scraping as it pertains to
                    > the min lathe. Sorry for the intrusion,
                    > wilfred
                    > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "timbaker416"
                    > <timbaker416@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "John Pitkin"
                    > > <cedarcreekranch@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > The shims may go under the angle bracket attaching the column
                    to
                    > the
                    > > > base. Because the bracket is pretty short from front to rear,
                    you
                    > > may
                    > > > wish to consider scraping the bracket instead of using shims. I
                    > > found
                    > > > it much easier to scrape. A little bit of adjustment on the
                    > bracket
                    > > > resulted in a large movement of the column.
                    > > >
                    > > > JP
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Thanks John, I was also concerned with the small footprint. Looks
                    > like
                    > > I'll be busy tomorow!
                    > >
                    > > Tim B.
                    > >
                    >
                  • cedge11
                    Tim I had to shim the column to bring things into Tram. After adding .003 worth of shim stock things improved remarkably. I recently purchsed a neat little
                    Message 9 of 18 , Apr 6, 2007
                      Tim
                      I had to shim the column to bring things into Tram. After adding .003
                      worth of shim stock things improved remarkably. I recently purchsed a
                      neat little tool that I probably should have made myself. Little
                      Machine shop offers a Tramming device that saves a whole lot of sweat
                      and allows for quite accurate Tramming.

                      Essentially it's a 4" flat disk with a with a 1/2" center stud for the
                      spindle. The stud on mine was machined from the billet rather than
                      threaded.
                      http://www.littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID=2599&category=

                      Loosen up the column bolts and the pivot nut, run the disk down onto
                      the bed of the mill and you can shim things as needed. A feeler guage
                      is used to check the gap beneath the Tram tool. I also used feeler
                      guages to determine how much shem was required.

                      When everything is as you want it... tighten the all nuts back up and
                      give things a few test cuts. So far I've not had to fine tune the
                      results after the initial column shems were put in place. The pivot
                      angle still moves from time to time, but it's easy to spot and fix and
                      I've got a mod in mind for that problem too.

                      No more dread when I need to tram my mini mill.

                      Steve
                    • oceanconcepts
                      I haven t checked to see, but try http://www.smallparts.com/ . A great source for some hard to find items. Ron R
                      Message 10 of 18 , Apr 6, 2007
                        I haven't checked to see, but try http://www.smallparts.com/ .

                        A great source for some hard to find items.

                        Ron R


                        --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "Gary Harper" <harperg@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hi. Does anyone have a good source for M2 fluteless taps? Also looking for
                        > M2 countersunk stainless steel screws with allen key heads. I need these
                        > for some optics work I am doing. Thanks.
                      • whoafat
                        John, thanks for the info, I am seriously considering scraping as an option, Wilfred -- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, John Pitkin ... dragged ... at ...
                        Message 11 of 18 , Apr 6, 2007
                          John,
                          thanks for the info, I am seriously considering scraping as an
                          option,
                          Wilfred
                          -- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "John Pitkin"
                          <cedarcreekranch@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > There are two methods of scraping.
                          >
                          > 1. The scraper is held nearly vertical and the sharp end is
                          dragged
                          > across the base metal in very short strokes. Sort of like picking
                          at
                          > a scab or fingernails on a blackboard. Tiny bits and curls of
                          metal
                          > will come off the base with each stroke. It takes LOTS of chips
                          over
                          > an area to reduce the surface. That's good. It means you go very
                          > slowly so you don't ruin the base material.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > 2. A scraper is held at a very low angle and the sharp end is
                          chipped
                          > into the surface like chiseling wood or chipping paint. The
                          scraper
                          > will dig into the surface taking a deeper cut. It leaves a lousy
                          > looking finish, too. But it's one way to get more material off if
                          you
                          > have a lot of metal to remove. Then return to method #1 to smooth
                          > things as you get close to finish.
                          >
                          > Scraping is much like filing with one giant tooth file. The
                          > difference is a file has a tendency to remove material from the
                          > perimeter of a surface. A scraper can remove material from the
                          center
                          > area of a surface.
                          >
                          > It's not a lost art, and it's really pretty simple to learn. Try
                          it
                          > on wood, first, to get the hang of it.
                          >
                          > John Pitkin
                          >
                          > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "whoafat" <whoafat@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > I am also new here with a weeks-old mini requiring tuneup. I
                          have
                          > > very little recent experience in this area. However, the
                          scraping
                          > > solution sound appealing but I am afraid that I will have to do
                          a
                          > lot
                          > > more research regarding the almost forgatton art of metal
                          scraping.
                          > > I'll keep tracking this threat to see if some of the more
                          seasoned
                          > > group members will expand on the art of scraping as it pertains
                          to
                          > > the min lathe. Sorry for the intrusion,
                          > > wilfred
                          > > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "timbaker416"
                          > > <timbaker416@> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "John Pitkin"
                          > > > <cedarcreekranch@> wrote:
                          > > > >
                          > > > > The shims may go under the angle bracket attaching the
                          column
                          > to
                          > > the
                          > > > > base. Because the bracket is pretty short from front to
                          rear,
                          > you
                          > > > may
                          > > > > wish to consider scraping the bracket instead of using
                          shims. I
                          > > > found
                          > > > > it much easier to scrape. A little bit of adjustment on the
                          > > bracket
                          > > > > resulted in a large movement of the column.
                          > > > >
                          > > > > JP
                          > > > >
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > Thanks John, I was also concerned with the small footprint.
                          Looks
                          > > like
                          > > > I'll be busy tomorow!
                          > > >
                          > > > Tim B.
                          > > >
                          > >
                          >
                        • whoafat
                          Steve, Very nice tool. I followed your lead and checked out the LMS Nano Trammer listings. They all seem to have a threaded hole in the center. I am not
                          Message 12 of 18 , Apr 6, 2007
                            Steve,
                            Very nice tool. I followed your lead and checked out the LMS Nano
                            Trammer listings. They all seem to have a threaded hole in the
                            center. I am not planning on buying one at this time but I could
                            not see one for the mini mill. As I am a nebie, I am sort of brain
                            picking so get up to speep,
                            Wilfred
                            --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "cedge11" <cedge@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Tim
                            > I had to shim the column to bring things into Tram. After
                            adding .003
                            > worth of shim stock things improved remarkably. I recently
                            purchsed a
                            > neat little tool that I probably should have made myself. Little
                            > Machine shop offers a Tramming device that saves a whole lot of
                            sweat
                            > and allows for quite accurate Tramming.
                            >
                            > Essentially it's a 4" flat disk with a with a 1/2" center stud for
                            the
                            > spindle. The stud on mine was machined from the billet rather than
                            > threaded.
                            > http://www.littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?
                            ProductID=2599&category=
                            >
                            > Loosen up the column bolts and the pivot nut, run the disk down
                            onto
                            > the bed of the mill and you can shim things as needed. A feeler
                            guage
                            > is used to check the gap beneath the Tram tool. I also used feeler
                            > guages to determine how much shem was required.
                            >
                            > When everything is as you want it... tighten the all nuts back up
                            and
                            > give things a few test cuts. So far I've not had to fine tune the
                            > results after the initial column shems were put in place. The pivot
                            > angle still moves from time to time, but it's easy to spot and fix
                            and
                            > I've got a mod in mind for that problem too.
                            >
                            > No more dread when I need to tram my mini mill.
                            >
                            > Steve
                            >
                          • John Pitkin
                            You can make a very good scraper from an old dull file. Grind the teeth off the end of a file for about 1/2 inch. Then sharpen the end of the file to a chisel
                            Message 13 of 18 , Apr 6, 2007
                              You can make a very good scraper from an old dull file. Grind the teeth
                              off the end of a file for about 1/2 inch. Then sharpen the end of the
                              file to a chisel point. Instead of a flat end blade like a chisel, a
                              scraper blade should have a curve. The curve will allow you to take out
                              small "dish" shaped curls of metal. If the blade is straight across the
                              end it will leave scratches and gouges and is harder to get a nice curl
                              of metal removed with each stroke. When grinding, be sure to keep the
                              file cool with frequent dunks in water.

                              Many users hold the upper end of the file with one hand and push the
                              lower cutting end with a thumb on the other hand.

                              Short tiny strokes in rapid sucession are very effective.
                              Normally, scrape a pattern in one direction (several parallel rows) and
                              then make passes at 60 to 90 degrees to the first pattern.

                              Quite simple, really, and much faster than you would think.

                              JP

                              --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "whoafat" <whoafat@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > John,
                              > thanks for the info, I am seriously considering scraping as an
                              > option,
                              > Wilfred
                            • timbaker416
                              Thanks Steve. I ve been looking at that myself. I read the review on LMS and I think it is a neat little tool. Th one with the 1/2 inch shank is recomended for
                              Message 14 of 18 , Apr 6, 2007
                                Thanks Steve. I've been looking at that myself. I read the review on
                                LMS and I think it is a neat little tool. Th one with the 1/2 inch
                                shank is recomended for the mini mill.

                                Thanks again,

                                Tim B.


                                --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "cedge11" <cedge@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Tim
                                > I had to shim the column to bring things into Tram. After
                                adding .003
                                > worth of shim stock things improved remarkably. I recently
                                purchsed a
                                > neat little tool that I probably should have made myself. Little
                                > Machine shop offers a Tramming device that saves a whole lot of
                                sweat
                                > and allows for quite accurate Tramming.
                                >
                                > Essentially it's a 4" flat disk with a with a 1/2" center stud for
                                the
                                > spindle. The stud on mine was machined from the billet rather than
                                > threaded.
                                > http://www.littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?
                                ProductID=2599&category=
                                >
                                > Loosen up the column bolts and the pivot nut, run the disk down
                                onto
                                > the bed of the mill and you can shim things as needed. A feeler
                                guage
                                > is used to check the gap beneath the Tram tool. I also used feeler
                                > guages to determine how much shem was required.
                                >
                                > When everything is as you want it... tighten the all nuts back up
                                and
                                > give things a few test cuts. So far I've not had to fine tune the
                                > results after the initial column shems were put in place. The pivot
                                > angle still moves from time to time, but it's easy to spot and fix
                                and
                                > I've got a mod in mind for that problem too.
                                >
                                > No more dread when I need to tram my mini mill.
                                >
                                > Steve
                                >
                              • whoafat
                                Steve, Good infromation. Thanks for taking the time. I know I have about .0035 inches to correct but I have to do a little more probing to determine exactly
                                Message 15 of 18 , Apr 6, 2007
                                  Steve,
                                  Good infromation. Thanks for taking the time. I know I have
                                  about .0035" inches to correct but I have to do a little more
                                  probing to determine exactly where the error is coming from before
                                  taking corrective actions. I had followed some of the scraping
                                  discussions but did not get that critical piece about the need for
                                  a curved cutting/scraping edge,
                                  wilfred
                                  -- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "John Pitkin"
                                  <cedarcreekranch@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > You can make a very good scraper from an old dull file. Grind the
                                  teeth
                                  > off the end of a file for about 1/2 inch. Then sharpen the end of
                                  the
                                  > file to a chisel point. Instead of a flat end blade like a chisel,
                                  a
                                  > scraper blade should have a curve. The curve will allow you to
                                  take out
                                  > small "dish" shaped curls of metal. If the blade is straight
                                  across the
                                  > end it will leave scratches and gouges and is harder to get a nice
                                  curl
                                  > of metal removed with each stroke. When grinding, be sure to keep
                                  the
                                  > file cool with frequent dunks in water.
                                  >
                                  > Many users hold the upper end of the file with one hand and push
                                  the
                                  > lower cutting end with a thumb on the other hand.
                                  >
                                  > Short tiny strokes in rapid sucession are very effective.
                                  > Normally, scrape a pattern in one direction (several parallel
                                  rows) and
                                  > then make passes at 60 to 90 degrees to the first pattern.
                                  >
                                  > Quite simple, really, and much faster than you would think.
                                  >
                                  > JP
                                  >
                                  > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "whoafat" <whoafat@> wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > John,
                                  > > thanks for the info, I am seriously considering scraping as an
                                  > > option,
                                  > > Wilfred
                                  >
                                • cedge11
                                  Wilfred Thats the beauty of the tool. It leaves no confusion as to where correction is needed. The tool holds everything in tram and squared so that you can
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Apr 6, 2007
                                    Wilfred
                                    Thats the beauty of the tool. It leaves no confusion as to where
                                    correction is needed. The tool holds everything in tram and squared so
                                    that you can easily determine where and how much to shim.

                                    Scraping is a solution that needs to be thought through before
                                    deciding to do it. You are removing metal that can never be put back.
                                    It's a soultion for some things, but it's not a fix all for every problem.

                                    I prefer to try out the easy fixes before taking on the time consuming
                                    ones... (wink)

                                    Give Chris a call at LMS and he can get you set up with the right
                                    version for the mini mill. Nice guy and very knowledgeable on almost
                                    every aspect of these machines.

                                    Steve

                                    --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "whoafat" <whoafat@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Steve,
                                    > Good infromation. Thanks for taking the time. I know I have
                                    > about .0035" inches to correct but I have to do a little more
                                    > probing to determine exactly where the error is coming from before
                                    > taking corrective actions. I had followed some of the scraping
                                    > discussions but did not get that critical piece about the need for
                                    > a curved cutting/scraping edge,
                                    > wilfred
                                    > -- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "John Pitkin"
                                    > <cedarcreekranch@> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > You can make a very good scraper from an old dull file. Grind the
                                    > teeth
                                    > > off the end of a file for about 1/2 inch. Then sharpen the end of
                                    > the
                                    > > file to a chisel point. Instead of a flat end blade like a chisel,
                                    > a
                                    > > scraper blade should have a curve. The curve will allow you to
                                    > take out
                                    > > small "dish" shaped curls of metal. If the blade is straight
                                    > across the
                                    > > end it will leave scratches and gouges and is harder to get a nice
                                    > curl
                                    > > of metal removed with each stroke. Wh

                                    en grinding, be sure to keep
                                    > the
                                    > > file cool with frequent dunks in water.
                                    > >
                                    > > Many users hold the upper end of the file with one hand and push
                                    > the
                                    > > lower cutting end with a thumb on the other hand.
                                    > >
                                    > > Short tiny strokes in rapid sucession are very effective.
                                    > > Normally, scrape a pattern in one direction (several parallel
                                    > rows) and
                                    > > then make passes at 60 to 90 degrees to the first pattern.
                                    > >
                                    > > Quite simple, really, and much faster than you would think.
                                    > >
                                    > > JP
                                    > >
                                    > > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "whoafat" <whoafat@> wrote:
                                    > > >
                                    > > > John,
                                    > > > thanks for the info, I am seriously considering scraping as an
                                    > > > option,
                                    > > > Wilfred
                                    > >
                                    >
                                  • whoafat
                                    Steve, I am in total agreement with you. For the mini mill, any procedure that can be done using shimming should be the preference since it allows you to make
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Apr 7, 2007
                                      Steve,
                                      I am in total agreement with you. For the mini mill, any procedure
                                      that can be done using shimming should be the preference since it
                                      allows you to make corrections without having to remove the column
                                      assembly. I am also interested in the scraping process as an added
                                      tool to fine tune my lathe and properly mate connecting surfaces.
                                      I'm greatful for the help I have received here at this site and
                                      especially, for the procedural methods provided by you and John P.
                                      Chris from LMS has also been helpful to me and I do appreciate his
                                      help. I don't know where he finds the time to personally address his
                                      cutomer's concerns.
                                      Wilfred

                                      --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "cedge11" <cedge@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Wilfred
                                      > Thats the beauty of the tool. It leaves no confusion as to where
                                      > correction is needed. The tool holds everything in tram and
                                      squared so
                                      > that you can easily determine where and how much to shim.
                                      >
                                      > Scraping is a solution that needs to be thought through before
                                      > deciding to do it. You are removing metal that can never be put
                                      back.
                                      > It's a soultion for some things, but it's not a fix all for every
                                      problem.
                                      >
                                      > I prefer to try out the easy fixes before taking on the time
                                      consuming
                                      > ones... (wink)
                                      >
                                      > Give Chris a call at LMS and he can get you set up with the right
                                      > version for the mini mill. Nice guy and very knowledgeable on
                                      almost
                                      > every aspect of these machines.
                                      >
                                      > Steve
                                      >
                                      > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "whoafat" <whoafat@> wrote:
                                      > >
                                      > > Steve,
                                      > > Good infromation. Thanks for taking the time. I know I have
                                      > > about .0035" inches to correct but I have to do a little more
                                      > > probing to determine exactly where the error is coming from
                                      before
                                      > > taking corrective actions. I had followed some of the scraping
                                      > > discussions but did not get that critical piece about the need
                                      for
                                      > > a curved cutting/scraping edge,
                                      > > wilfred
                                      > > -- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "John Pitkin"
                                      > > <cedarcreekranch@> wrote:
                                      > > >
                                      > > > You can make a very good scraper from an old dull file. Grind
                                      the
                                      > > teeth
                                      > > > off the end of a file for about 1/2 inch. Then sharpen the end
                                      of
                                      > > the
                                      > > > file to a chisel point. Instead of a flat end blade like a
                                      chisel,
                                      > > a
                                      > > > scraper blade should have a curve. The curve will allow you to
                                      > > take out
                                      > > > small "dish" shaped curls of metal. If the blade is straight
                                      > > across the
                                      > > > end it will leave scratches and gouges and is harder to get a
                                      nice
                                      > > curl
                                      > > > of metal removed with each stroke. Wh
                                      >
                                      > en grinding, be sure to keep
                                      > > the
                                      > > > file cool with frequent dunks in water.
                                      > > >
                                      > > > Many users hold the upper end of the file with one hand and
                                      push
                                      > > the
                                      > > > lower cutting end with a thumb on the other hand.
                                      > > >
                                      > > > Short tiny strokes in rapid sucession are very effective.
                                      > > > Normally, scrape a pattern in one direction (several parallel
                                      > > rows) and
                                      > > > then make passes at 60 to 90 degrees to the first pattern.
                                      > > >
                                      > > > Quite simple, really, and much faster than you would think.
                                      > > >
                                      > > > JP
                                      > > >
                                      > > > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "whoafat" <whoafat@>
                                      wrote:
                                      > > > >
                                      > > > > John,
                                      > > > > thanks for the info, I am seriously considering scraping as
                                      an
                                      > > > > option,
                                      > > > > Wilfred
                                      > > >
                                      > >
                                      >
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