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Re: Conversion Shopping Time!

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  • steveh8861
    HUH? 425 s on a x2 is big power! Ray has super duper cryptonite power on his x2 with 500 s and geckos :-). Very cool to have I am sure, But I would not say
    Message 1 of 29 , Mar 2, 2007
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      HUH? 425's on a x2 is big power! Ray has super duper cryptonite power
      on his x2 with 500's and geckos :-). Very cool to have I am sure, But
      I would not say the x2 needs that kind of power. That's like a blown
      big block stuffed in a Pinto.
      269's will work great on a x2 and in no way will cutting ability ever
      be limited with them.

      I use 425's and a xylotex on my x3. I can run it at 100ipm but keep it
      at 75IPM. Still way more power and speed than the x3 can use for
      actual cutting. And the x3 is twice as powerful and heavy as the x2.

      Steppers and drives are the easy part.Pay your money and hook them
      up. The thing that is going to make your cnc mill be a real performer
      is accuracy and repeatability which also requires extreme low
      backlash. Study up on bearing supports and methods to reduce backlash.
      My x2 ran with .0025-.004" backlash which was not bad. My x3 is at
      .0005" and let me tell you there is a world of difference with the
      much lower backlash.
      Steve



      --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Kenny" <billcnc@...> wrote:
      >
      > Cool so many choices, I just passed on some 425oz. steppers for 140
      on ebay.
      > It was hard but you guys tell me 500oz or more so thats what I will
      get. So
      > is a seperate board for each motor better than 1 board for all three?
      >
      > Thanks Guys :-)
      > Bill
      >
      > On 3/2/07, Ray Livingston <jagboy1964@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Bill,
      > > G320's for steppers. HomeshopCNC will sell them to you for, I
      > > think, $90 each if you but the motors from them. That's where I got
      > > mine.
      > >
      > > Regards,
      > > Ray L.
      > >
      > > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
      <GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com>,
      > > "Bill Kenny" <billcnc@>
      > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > What gecko drives should I get?
      > > >
      > > > On 3/1/07, Ray Livingston <jagboy1964@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Reza,
      > > > > First, you'd need two LMD18245s per motor, at about $15 each.
      > > > > Then you'll need a microprocessor to convert step/direction
      > > controls
      > > > > to the control signal timing to sequence the LMD18245s correctly,
      > > > > especially for micro-stepping, which is pretty much required here.
      > > > > You'll likely spend a fair amount of time on the firmware to get
      > > them
      > > > > working properly, and reliably. The PCB layout can be trickier
      > > than
      > > > > it appears, due to the highly inductive load of the motor coils. I
      > > > > wouldn't bet on getting it right on the first attempt. Odds are
      > > also
      > > > > pretty good you'll fry a few LMD18245s before you're done. It's
      > > do-
      > > > > able, but it's non-trivial, and will take a considerable time
      > > > > investment to get it fully sorted out. And you're still left with
      > > a
      > > > > 3A current limit, which may, or may not, be adequate. The *only*
      > > > > advantage over the THStep is the higher voltage capability, which
      > > is
      > > > > really only of great value if you're concerned about higher
      > > speeds.
      > > > >
      > > > > Regards,
      > > > > Ray L.
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In
      GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com<GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com><GrizHFMinimill%
      > > 40yahoogroups.com>,
      > > > > Reza Naima <reza@> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > how do these compare? I was thinking of designing a single pcb
      > > to
      > > > > use
      > > > > > the same LMD18245 drivers, but setup to drive all 3-axis on one
      > > > > pcb. I
      > > > > > skimmed the datasheet, and it didn't look terribly difficult to
      > > > > drive.
      > > > > > However, I've never done work with steppers -- is it tricky?
      > > > > >
      > > > > > I usually have PCBs made in lots of 5, so if anyone is
      > > interested
      > > > > in
      > > > > > splitting the cost, let me know. Should run under $20 for a pcb
      > > to
      > > > > > handle 3 axis.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > reza
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Ray Livingston wrote:
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Bill,
      > > > > > > The HobbyCNC is good for the price, but it will only drive
      > > > > > > unipolar motors, and is still limited to 3A, albeit at 42V.
      > > > > Bipolar
      > > > > > > motors will give you more torque - or, more correctly,
      > > running a
      > > > > > > motor in unipolar mode will give you about 30% less than the
      > > full
      > > > > > > rated torque for the motor, and will reduce your motor
      > > choices as
      > > > > > > you'll be ably to use only 6- or 8-wire motors. So, I wouldn't
      > > > > > > recommend it for this application. If money is really an
      > > issue, go
      > > > > > > to:
      > > > > > > http://www.thsengineering.com/products/products.html
      > > > > > > <http://www.thsengineering.com/products/products.html>
      > > > > > > These boards are functionally identical to Xylotex, and can be
      > > > > > > built for about $25 per axis. They have the same 30V/2.5A
      > > > > limitation
      > > > > > > as the Xylotex, but will drive bipolar motors.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Regards,
      > > > > > > Ray L.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > --- In
      GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com<GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > <GrizHFMinimill%
      > > 40yahoogroups.com>
      > > > > > > <mailto:GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com>, "Bill" <billcnc@>
      > > > > wrote:
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > Ray,
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > Instead of the Gecko drives, What do you think of the
      > > hpbbyCNC
      > > > > > > drive?
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > Thanks
      > > > > > > > Bill
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > --- In
      GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com<GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > <GrizHFMinimill%
      > > 40yahoogroups.com>
      > > > > > > <mailto:GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com>, "Ray Livingston"
      > > > > > > > <jagboy1964@> wrote:
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > Bill,
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > Though 280 oz-in motors will work OK with the stock
      > > > > > > leadscrews, I
      > > > > > > > > would suggest getting bigger motors, just in case you
      > > want to
      > > > > go
      > > > > > > to
      > > > > > > > > ballscrews later. You can get 500 oz-in motors for very
      > > little
      > > > > > > > > additional cost (about $60 per motor). I'd also get Gecko
      > > > > > > drives,
      > > > > > > > > instead of Xylotex, for the higher voltage and current
      > > > > > > capability.
      > > > > > > > > That'll give you not only more torque, but more speed.
      > > You can
      > > > > > > get
      > > > > > > > > the motors, drives, and power supply components from Rick
      > > > > LaLonde
      > > > > > > at
      > > > > > > > > homeshopcnc.com. He can also sell you ballscrews when
      > > you're
      > > > > > > ready.
      > > > > > > > > You can get conversion plans from a number of places,
      > > > > including
      > > > > > > from
      > > > > > > > > David at fignoggle.com, who's a regular on here, and very
      > > > > helpful.
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > Regards,
      > > > > > > > > Ray L.
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > --- In
      GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com<GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > <GrizHFMinimill%
      > > 40yahoogroups.com>
      > > > > > > <mailto:GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com>, "Bill" <billcnc@>
      > > > > wrote:
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > Alright, I am ready to do my shopping for the CNC
      > > > > conversion to
      > > > > > > the
      > > > > > > > > > X2. I have it torn completely apart and have given it
      > > the
      > > > > total
      > > > > > > > > > cleaning and tuning up the parts. I finally got the bugs
      > > > > out of
      > > > > > > it
      > > > > > > > > and
      > > > > > > > > > now she is ready for the job of being converted to CNC.
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > I need to start shopping for parts. I was thinking of
      > > the
      > > > > > > HobbyCNC
      > > > > > > > > > board but I am not sure exactly what steppers I should
      > > get.
      > > > > Will
      > > > > > > > > > around 280 in. of torque do the job? also what about the
      > > > > > > mounts?
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > I would like to stick with the stock screws if I could
      > > for
      > > > > the
      > > > > > > mean
      > > > > > > > > time.
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > Would it be better if I bought a kit to convert it? I
      > > would
      > > > > > > rather
      > > > > > > > > not
      > > > > > > > > > only because I believe putting this together from pieces
      > > > > will
      > > > > > > give
      > > > > > > > > me
      > > > > > > > > > a great wealth of knowledge on how it should be and why
      > > it
      > > > > has
      > > > > > > to be
      > > > > > > > > > that way. I have other projects down the road that I
      > > will be
      > > > > > > > > > fabricating so this is my educational learning curve.
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > Thanks
      > > > > > > > > > Bill
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
    • Chris Wood
      Bill: If, by your plans you mean Ron s Steele s plans that we sell, I do not think there is anything you can t make on a mini mill and mini lathe. Regards,
      Message 2 of 29 , Mar 2, 2007
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        Bill:
         
        If, by "your plans" you mean Ron's Steele's plans that we sell, I do not think there is anything you can't make on a mini mill and mini lathe.
         
        Regards,
        Chris Wood
         
        LittleMachineShop.com
        The premier source of parts and accessories for mini lathes and mini mills.
        396 W. Washington Blvd. #500, Pasadena, CA 91103
        (800)981-9663 * Fax (626)797-7934


        From: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill Kenny
        Sent: Friday, March 02, 2007 9:32 AM
        To: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [GrizHFMinimill] Re: Conversion Shopping Time!

        Chris,

        Can your plans be build on the X2 with the stock travel and without having to re-clamp the part to accommodate the limited travel of this machine, or do you need a bigger mill?

        Thanks
        Bill

        On 3/2/07, Chris Wood <chrisw@littlemachin eshop.com> wrote:

        Things will get better this afternoon when we receive a shipment from China.
         
        Regards,
        Chris Wood
         
        LittleMachineShop. com
        The premier source of parts and accessories for mini lathes and mini mills.
        396 W. Washington Blvd. #500, Pasadena, CA 91103
        (800)981-9663 * Fax (626)797-7934



        From: GrizHFMinimill@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Bill Kenny
        Sent: Thursday, March 01, 2007 8:30 PM
        To: GrizHFMinimill@ yahoogroups. com
        Subject: Re: [GrizHFMinimill] Re: Conversion Shopping Time!

        Just my luck, They are out of stock on EVERYTHING!

        On 3/1/07, Ray Livingston <jagboy1964@hotmail. com> wrote:

        Bill,
        The HobbyCNC is good for the price, but it will only drive
        unipolar motors, and is still limited to 3A, albeit at 42V. Bipolar
        motors will give you more torque - or, more correctly, running a
        motor in unipolar mode will give you about 30% less than the full
        rated torque for the motor, and will reduce your motor choices as
        you'll be ably to use only 6- or 8-wire motors. So, I wouldn't
        recommend it for this application. If money is really an issue, go
        to:
        http://www.thsengin eering.com/ products/ products. html
        These boards are functionally identical to Xylotex, and can be
        built for about $25 per axis. They have the same 30V/2.5A limitation
        as the Xylotex, but will drive bipolar motors.



        Regards,
        Ray L.

        --- In GrizHFMinimill@ yahoogroups. com, "Bill" <billcnc@...> wrote:
        >
        > Ray,
        >
        > Instead of the Gecko drives, What do you think of the hpbbyCNC
        drive?
        >
        > Thanks
        > Bill
        >
        > --- In GrizHFMinimill@ yahoogroups. com, "Ray Livingston"
        > <jagboy1964@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Bill,
        > >
        > > Though 280 oz-in motors will work OK with the stock
        leadscrews, I
        > > would suggest getting bigger motors, just in case you want to go
        to
        > > ballscrews later. You can get 500 oz-in motors for very little
        > > additional cost (about $60 per motor). I'd also get Gecko
        drives,
        > > instead of Xylotex, for the higher voltage and current
        capability.
        > > That'll give you not only more torque, but more speed. You can
        get
        > > the motors, drives, and power supply components from Rick LaLonde
        at
        > > homeshopcnc. com. He can also sell you ballscrews when you're
        ready.
        > > You can get conversion plans from a number of places, including
        from
        > > David at fignoggle.com, who's a regular on here, and very helpful.
        > >
        > > Regards,
        > > Ray L.
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In GrizHFMinimill@ yahoogroups. com, "Bill" <billcnc@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Alright, I am ready to do my shopping for the CNC conversion to
        the
        > > > X2. I have it torn completely apart and have given it the total
        > > > cleaning and tuning up the parts. I finally got the bugs out of
        it
        > > and
        > > > now she is ready for the job of being converted to CNC.
        > > >
        > > > I need to start shopping for parts. I was thinking of the
        HobbyCNC
        > > > board but I am not sure exactly what steppers I should get. Will
        > > > around 280 in. of torque do the job? also what about the
        mounts?
        > > >
        > > > I would like to stick with the stock screws if I could for the
        mean
        > > time.
        > > >
        > > > Would it be better if I bought a kit to convert it? I would
        rather
        > > not
        > > > only because I believe putting this together from pieces will
        give
        > > me
        > > > a great wealth of knowledge on how it should be and why it has
        to be
        > > > that way. I have other projects down the road that I will be
        > > > fabricating so this is my educational learning curve.
        > > >
        > > > Thanks
        > > > Bill
        > > >
        > >
        >



      • Barry Young
        Hi Chris: I just received an order from LMS yesterday. The first of two I placed this week. I don t think you are ever out of very much for very long. Time and
        Message 3 of 29 , Mar 2, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Chris:

          I just received an order from LMS yesterday. The first
          of two I placed this week. I don't think you are ever
          out of very much for very long. Time and time again
          people talk on here about the great service from LMS.
          Keep it up Chris.

          Barry Young
          Young Camera Company




          --- Chris Wood <chrisw@...> wrote:

          > Oops. I didn't read the message and thought I was
          > answering a message
          > about lathe chucks. I of course know nothing about
          > their stock status.
          >
          > Sorry,
          > Chris Wood
          >
          > LittleMachineShop.com
          > <http://www.littlemachineshop.com/>
          > The premier source of parts and accessories for mini
          > lathes and mini
          > mills.
          > 396 W. Washington Blvd. #500, Pasadena, CA 91103
          > (800)981-9663 * Fax (626)797-7934
          >
          > ________________________________
          >
          > From: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
          > [mailto:GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          > Chris Wood
          > Sent: Friday, March 02, 2007 8:58 AM
          > To: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: RE: [GrizHFMinimill] Re: Conversion
          > Shopping Time!
          >
          >
          >
          > Things will get better this afternoon when we
          > receive a shipment from
          > China.
          >
          > Regards,
          > Chris Wood
          >
          > LittleMachineShop.com
          > <http://www.littlemachineshop.com/>
          > The premier source of parts and accessories for mini
          > lathes and mini
          > mills.
          > 396 W. Washington Blvd. #500, Pasadena, CA 91103
          > (800)981-9663 * Fax (626)797-7934
          >
          > ________________________________
          >
          > From: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
          > [mailto:GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          > Bill Kenny
          > Sent: Thursday, March 01, 2007 8:30 PM
          > To: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: Re: [GrizHFMinimill] Re: Conversion
          > Shopping Time!
          >
          >
          >
          > Just my luck, They are out of stock on EVERYTHING!
          >
          >
          > On 3/1/07, Ray Livingston <jagboy1964@...
          > <mailto:jagboy1964@...> > wrote:
          >
          > Bill,
          > The HobbyCNC is good for the price, but it will
          > only drive
          > unipolar motors, and is still limited to 3A, albeit
          > at 42V.
          > Bipolar
          > motors will give you more torque - or, more
          > correctly, running a
          >
          > motor in unipolar mode will give you about 30% less
          > than the
          > full
          > rated torque for the motor, and will reduce your
          > motor choices
          > as
          > you'll be ably to use only 6- or 8-wire motors. So,
          > I wouldn't
          > recommend it for this application. If money is
          > really an issue,
          > go
          > to:
          >
          > http://www.thsengineering.com/products/products.html
          >
          <http://www.thsengineering.com/products/products.html>
          >
          > These boards are functionally identical to Xylotex,
          > and can be
          > built for about $25 per axis. They have the same
          > 30V/2.5A
          > limitation
          > as the Xylotex, but will drive bipolar motors.
          >
          >
          >
          > Regards,
          > Ray L.
          >
          > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com> , "Bill"
          > <billcnc@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Ray,
          > >
          > > Instead of the Gecko drives, What do you think of
          > the hpbbyCNC
          >
          > drive?
          > >
          > > Thanks
          > > Bill
          > >
          > > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com> , "Ray
          > Livingston"
          > > <jagboy1964@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Bill,
          > > >
          > > > Though 280 oz-in motors will work OK with the
          > stock
          > leadscrews, I
          > > > would suggest getting bigger motors, just in
          > case you want
          > to go
          > to
          > > > ballscrews later. You can get 500 oz-in motors
          > for very
          > little
          > > > additional cost (about $60 per motor). I'd also
          > get Gecko
          > drives,
          > > > instead of Xylotex, for the higher voltage and
          > current
          > capability.
          > > > That'll give you not only more torque, but more
          > speed. You
          > can
          > get
          > > > the motors, drives, and power supply components
          > from Rick
          > LaLonde
          > at
          > > > homeshopcnc.com <http://homeshopcnc.com> . He
          > can also sell
          > you ballscrews when you're
          > ready.
          > > > You can get conversion plans from a number of
          > places,
          > including
          > from
          > > > David at fignoggle.com, who's a regular on
          > here, and very
          > helpful.
          > > >
          > > > Regards,
          > > > Ray L.
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com> , "Bill"
          > <billcnc@> wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > Alright, I am ready to do my shopping for the
          > CNC
          > conversion to
          > the
          > > > > X2. I have it torn completely apart and have
          > given it the
          > total
          > > > > cleaning and tuning up the parts. I finally
          > got the bugs
          > out of
          > it
          > > > and
          > > > > now she is ready for the job of being
          > converted to CNC.
          > > > >
          > > > > I need to start shopping for parts. I was
          > thinking of the
          > HobbyCNC
          > > > > board but I am not sure exactly what steppers
          > I should
          > get. Will
          > > > > around 280 in. of torque do the job? also
          > what about the
          > mounts?
          > > > >
          > > > > I would like to stick with the stock screws
          > if I could for
          > the
          > mean
          > > > time.
          > > > >
          > > > > Would it be better if I bought a kit to
          > convert it? I
          > would
          > rather
          > > > not
          > > > > only because I believe putting this together
          > from pieces
          > will
          > give
          > > > me
          > > > > a great wealth of knowledge on how it should
          > be and why it
          > has
          > to be
          > > > > that way. I have other projects down the road
          > that I will
          > be
          > > > > fabricating so this is my educational
          > learning curve.
          > > > >
          > > > > Thanks
          > > > > Bill
          > > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >




          ____________________________________________________________________________________
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        • ppanda@pacbell.net
          Steve, My logic is the 500 oz-in motors are all of about $10-15 more than the 269 oz-in motors, so why not get them? And I agree that with leadscrews, it s
          Message 4 of 29 , Mar 2, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            Steve,
            My logic is the 500 oz-in motors are all of about $10-15 more
            than the 269 oz-in motors, so why not get them? And I agree that
            with leadscrews, it's overkill (in fact, my first post said that).
            But with ballscrews, and nice tight gibs, the 500s are nice, and he
            might someday want to move up.

            Regards,
            Ray L.


            --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "steveh8861" <steveh8861@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > HUH? 425's on a x2 is big power! Ray has super duper cryptonite
            power
            > on his x2 with 500's and geckos :-). Very cool to have I am sure,
            But
            > I would not say the x2 needs that kind of power. That's like a
            blown
            > big block stuffed in a Pinto.
            > 269's will work great on a x2 and in no way will cutting ability
            ever
            > be limited with them.
            >
            > I use 425's and a xylotex on my x3. I can run it at 100ipm but keep
            it
            > at 75IPM. Still way more power and speed than the x3 can use for
            > actual cutting. And the x3 is twice as powerful and heavy as the x2.
            >
            > Steppers and drives are the easy part.Pay your money and hook them
            > up. The thing that is going to make your cnc mill be a real
            performer
            > is accuracy and repeatability which also requires extreme low
            > backlash. Study up on bearing supports and methods to reduce
            backlash.
            > My x2 ran with .0025-.004" backlash which was not bad. My x3 is at
            > .0005" and let me tell you there is a world of difference with the
            > much lower backlash.
            > Steve
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Kenny" <billcnc@>
            wrote:
            > >
            > > Cool so many choices, I just passed on some 425oz. steppers for
            140
            > on ebay.
            > > It was hard but you guys tell me 500oz or more so thats what I
            will
            > get. So
            > > is a seperate board for each motor better than 1 board for all
            three?
            > >
            > > Thanks Guys :-)
            > > Bill
            > >
            > > On 3/2/07, Ray Livingston <jagboy1964@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Bill,
            > > > G320's for steppers. HomeshopCNC will sell them to you for, I
            > > > think, $90 each if you but the motors from them. That's where I
            got
            > > > mine.
            > > >
            > > > Regards,
            > > > Ray L.
            > > >
            > > > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
            > <GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com>,
            > > > "Bill Kenny" <billcnc@>
            > > > wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > > What gecko drives should I get?
            > > > >
            > > > > On 3/1/07, Ray Livingston <jagboy1964@> wrote:
            > > > > >
            > > > > > Reza,
            > > > > > First, you'd need two LMD18245s per motor, at about $15
            each.
            > > > > > Then you'll need a microprocessor to convert step/direction
            > > > controls
            > > > > > to the control signal timing to sequence the LMD18245s
            correctly,
            > > > > > especially for micro-stepping, which is pretty much
            required here.
            > > > > > You'll likely spend a fair amount of time on the firmware
            to get
            > > > them
            > > > > > working properly, and reliably. The PCB layout can be
            trickier
            > > > than
            > > > > > it appears, due to the highly inductive load of the motor
            coils. I
            > > > > > wouldn't bet on getting it right on the first attempt. Odds
            are
            > > > also
            > > > > > pretty good you'll fry a few LMD18245s before you're done.
            It's
            > > > do-
            > > > > > able, but it's non-trivial, and will take a considerable
            time
            > > > > > investment to get it fully sorted out. And you're still
            left with
            > > > a
            > > > > > 3A current limit, which may, or may not, be adequate. The
            *only*
            > > > > > advantage over the THStep is the higher voltage capability,
            which
            > > > is
            > > > > > really only of great value if you're concerned about higher
            > > > speeds.
            > > > > >
            > > > > > Regards,
            > > > > > Ray L.
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > > --- In
            > GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com<GrizHFMinimill%
            40yahoogroups.com><GrizHFMinimill%
            > > > 40yahoogroups.com>,
            > > > > > Reza Naima <reza@> wrote:
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > how do these compare? I was thinking of designing a
            single pcb
            > > > to
            > > > > > use
            > > > > > > the same LMD18245 drivers, but setup to drive all 3-axis
            on one
            > > > > > pcb. I
            > > > > > > skimmed the datasheet, and it didn't look terribly
            difficult to
            > > > > > drive.
            > > > > > > However, I've never done work with steppers -- is it
            tricky?
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > I usually have PCBs made in lots of 5, so if anyone is
            > > > interested
            > > > > > in
            > > > > > > splitting the cost, let me know. Should run under $20 for
            a pcb
            > > > to
            > > > > > > handle 3 axis.
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > reza
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > Ray Livingston wrote:
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > Bill,
            > > > > > > > The HobbyCNC is good for the price, but it will only
            drive
            > > > > > > > unipolar motors, and is still limited to 3A, albeit at
            42V.
            > > > > > Bipolar
            > > > > > > > motors will give you more torque - or, more correctly,
            > > > running a
            > > > > > > > motor in unipolar mode will give you about 30% less
            than the
            > > > full
            > > > > > > > rated torque for the motor, and will reduce your motor
            > > > choices as
            > > > > > > > you'll be ably to use only 6- or 8-wire motors. So, I
            wouldn't
            > > > > > > > recommend it for this application. If money is really an
            > > > issue, go
            > > > > > > > to:
            > > > > > > > http://www.thsengineering.com/products/products.html
            > > > > > > > <http://www.thsengineering.com/products/products.html>
            > > > > > > > These boards are functionally identical to Xylotex, and
            can be
            > > > > > > > built for about $25 per axis. They have the same
            30V/2.5A
            > > > > > limitation
            > > > > > > > as the Xylotex, but will drive bipolar motors.
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > Regards,
            > > > > > > > Ray L.
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > --- In
            > GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com<GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com>
            > > > <GrizHFMinimill%
            > > > 40yahoogroups.com>
            > > > > > > > <mailto:GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com>, "Bill"
            <billcnc@>
            > > > > > wrote:
            > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > Ray,
            > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > Instead of the Gecko drives, What do you think of the
            > > > hpbbyCNC
            > > > > > > > drive?
            > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > Thanks
            > > > > > > > > Bill
            > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > --- In
            > GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com<GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com>
            > > > <GrizHFMinimill%
            > > > 40yahoogroups.com>
            > > > > > > > <mailto:GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com>, "Ray
            Livingston"
            > > > > > > > > <jagboy1964@> wrote:
            > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > > Bill,
            > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > > Though 280 oz-in motors will work OK with the stock
            > > > > > > > leadscrews, I
            > > > > > > > > > would suggest getting bigger motors, just in case
            you
            > > > want to
            > > > > > go
            > > > > > > > to
            > > > > > > > > > ballscrews later. You can get 500 oz-in motors for
            very
            > > > little
            > > > > > > > > > additional cost (about $60 per motor). I'd also get
            Gecko
            > > > > > > > drives,
            > > > > > > > > > instead of Xylotex, for the higher voltage and
            current
            > > > > > > > capability.
            > > > > > > > > > That'll give you not only more torque, but more
            speed.
            > > > You can
            > > > > > > > get
            > > > > > > > > > the motors, drives, and power supply components
            from Rick
            > > > > > LaLonde
            > > > > > > > at
            > > > > > > > > > homeshopcnc.com. He can also sell you ballscrews
            when
            > > > you're
            > > > > > > > ready.
            > > > > > > > > > You can get conversion plans from a number of
            places,
            > > > > > including
            > > > > > > > from
            > > > > > > > > > David at fignoggle.com, who's a regular on here,
            and very
            > > > > > helpful.
            > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > > Regards,
            > > > > > > > > > Ray L.
            > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > > --- In
            > GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com<GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com>
            > > > <GrizHFMinimill%
            > > > 40yahoogroups.com>
            > > > > > > > <mailto:GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com>, "Bill"
            <billcnc@>
            > > > > > wrote:
            > > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > > > Alright, I am ready to do my shopping for the CNC
            > > > > > conversion to
            > > > > > > > the
            > > > > > > > > > > X2. I have it torn completely apart and have
            given it
            > > > the
            > > > > > total
            > > > > > > > > > > cleaning and tuning up the parts. I finally got
            the bugs
            > > > > > out of
            > > > > > > > it
            > > > > > > > > > and
            > > > > > > > > > > now she is ready for the job of being converted
            to CNC.
            > > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > > > I need to start shopping for parts. I was
            thinking of
            > > > the
            > > > > > > > HobbyCNC
            > > > > > > > > > > board but I am not sure exactly what steppers I
            should
            > > > get.
            > > > > > Will
            > > > > > > > > > > around 280 in. of torque do the job? also what
            about the
            > > > > > > > mounts?
            > > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > > > I would like to stick with the stock screws if I
            could
            > > > for
            > > > > > the
            > > > > > > > mean
            > > > > > > > > > time.
            > > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > > > Would it be better if I bought a kit to convert
            it? I
            > > > would
            > > > > > > > rather
            > > > > > > > > > not
            > > > > > > > > > > only because I believe putting this together from
            pieces
            > > > > > will
            > > > > > > > give
            > > > > > > > > > me
            > > > > > > > > > > a great wealth of knowledge on how it should be
            and why
            > > > it
            > > > > > has
            > > > > > > > to be
            > > > > > > > > > > that way. I have other projects down the road
            that I
            > > > will be
            > > > > > > > > > > fabricating so this is my educational learning
            curve.
            > > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > > > Thanks
            > > > > > > > > > > Bill
            > > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • Mike Gehring
            Hi Bill, I m roughing in the parts for the steele cnc Nema 23 motor conversion right now. You could actually make all the parts on the mill without a lathe
            Message 5 of 29 , Mar 2, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi Bill,   I'm roughing in the parts for the steele cnc Nema 23 motor conversion right now. You could actually make all the parts on the mill without a lathe (would make some easier) if you have the right materials, meaning not turning down 1" aluminum tube to 1/2" etc. Also you need a boring head for the mill to cut the center holes for the motor shaft and mounting etc. Actually, I could make you an offer on materials for this conversion if you're interested. NOT COMPLETED PARTS, Just close outlined for ALL PLATES and ROD material .  Would probably save you at least one days efforts just roughing in the raw stock ( actually conservative number, maybe 2 days work), not counting the time to acquire the materials.
                   You mentioned the vise. You'll need a workplat on your mill table, or blocks to clamp down to as one plate is almost 4" by 7" by 1/2" and a lot of 2.5" and 4"x4" VEE blocks maybe to hold tubes vertically for drill and tapping for the motor standoffs. Approximately 24 pieces to drill and tap after cutting to length.
                   You can buy motor to leadscrerw couplings or make them.(more cylinderical cutting drilling and tapping.)
                   If you'd like, I can give you a list of a few places with some of these parts, such as collars ,couplings micro switches at cheaper than ebay prices. You'll also need bearings, radial and thrust, and the z axis you may need a couple of XL TIMING BELT PULLEYS, Precision threaded rod and leadscrew  (Z AXIS OPTION) .
                   If you haven't noticed, this CNC CONVERSION  isn't going to happen overnight. In you're first post  "I'm  ready", you should rephrase to I'm getting ready and preparing to convert to CNC.
                   ALL this will keep you busy for a while. Looks like you're about 3 weeks to a month away from being almost done. And that might be too optomistic and hurried. You'll nee a big shoe box to stuff all this stuff in and power supplies and maybe cooling fan (S)
                   Steve is right about the stepper motors. Ray knew about my 425 in.. -Oz steppers at $52.00 each but he  REALLY didn't want to come up short on power.
                   Then again Steve is WRONG in his statement that his X3 is twice as powerful as the X2..  His X3 is only 1/2 as powerful and about the same weight as some X2's (that's not a typo,that's a fact) and I'll post some pic's tonite or tomorrow  showing proof.  (YES, the BIG BLUE X2 is TWICE as POWERFUL as the majoriy of the X3 mills.        Have a nice evening,   Mike G.

              ----- Original Message ----
              From: Bill Kenny <billcnc@...>
              To: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Friday, March 2, 2007 5:33:05 PM
              Subject: Re: [GrizHFMinimill] Re: Conversion Shopping Time!

              ??? OK Chris ???,

              Does anyone else know if the plans that littlemachinshop sells can be made on the X2 without having to change clamping positions a few times?

              Thanks
              Bill

              On 3/2/07, Chris Wood <chrisw@littlemachin eshop.com> wrote:

              Oops. I didn't read the message and thought I was answering a message about lathe chucks. I of course know nothing about their stock status.
               
              Sorry,
              Chris Wood
               
              LittleMachineShop. com
              The premier source of parts and accessories for mini lathes and mini mills.
              396 W. Washington Blvd. #500, Pasadena, CA 91103
              (800)981-9663 * Fax (626)797-7934


              From: GrizHFMinimill@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Chris Wood
              Sent: Friday, March 02, 2007 8:58 AM
              To: GrizHFMinimill@ yahoogroups. com
              Subject: RE: [GrizHFMinimill] Re: Conversion Shopping Time!

              Things will get better this afternoon when we receive a shipment from China.
               
              Regards,
              Chris Wood
               
              LittleMachineShop. com
              The premier source of parts and accessories for mini lathes and mini mills.
              396 W. Washington Blvd. #500, Pasadena, CA 91103
              (800)981-9663 * Fax (626)797-7934


              From: GrizHFMinimill@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Bill Kenny
              Sent: Thursday, March 01, 2007 8:30 PM
              To: GrizHFMinimill@ yahoogroups. com
              Subject: Re: [GrizHFMinimill] Re: Conversion Shopping Time!

              Just my luck, They are out of stock on EVERYTHING!

              On 3/1/07, Ray Livingston <jagboy1964@hotmail. com> wrote:

              Bill,
              The HobbyCNC is good for the price, but it will only drive
              unipolar motors, and is still limited to 3A, albeit at 42V. Bipolar
              motors will give you more torque - or, more correctly, running a
              motor in unipolar mode will give you about 30% less than the full
              rated torque for the motor, and will reduce your motor choices as
              you'll be ably to use only 6- or 8-wire motors. So, I wouldn't
              recommend it for this application. If money is really an issue, go
              to:
              http://www.thsengin eering.com/ products/ products. html
              These boards are functionally identical to Xylotex, and can be
              built for about $25 per axis. They have the same 30V/2.5A limitation
              as the Xylotex, but will drive bipolar motors.



              Regards,
              Ray L.

              --- In GrizHFMinimill@ yahoogroups. com, "Bill" <billcnc@...> wrote:
              >
              > Ray,
              >
              > Instead of the Gecko drives, What do you think of the hpbbyCNC
              drive?
              >
              > Thanks
              > Bill
              >
              > --- In GrizHFMinimill@ yahoogroups. com, "Ray Livingston"
              > <jagboy1964@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Bill,
              > >
              > > Though 280 oz-in motors will work OK with the stock
              leadscrews, I
              > > would suggest getting bigger motors, just in case you want to go
              to
              > > ballscrews later. You can get 500 oz-in motors for very little
              > > additional cost (about $60 per motor). I'd also get Gecko
              drives,
              > > instead of Xylotex, for the higher voltage and current
              capability.
              > > That'll give you not only more torque, but more speed. You can
              get
              > > the motors, drives, and power supply components from Rick LaLonde
              at
              > > homeshopcnc. com. He can also sell you ballscrews when you're
              ready.
              > > You can get conversion plans from a number of places, including
              from
              > > David at fignoggle.com, who's a regular on here, and very helpful.
              > >
              > > Regards,
              > > Ray L.
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In GrizHFMinimill@ yahoogroups. com, "Bill" <billcnc@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Alright, I am ready to do my shopping for the CNC conversion to
              the
              > > > X2. I have it torn completely apart and have given it the total
              > > > cleaning and tuning up the parts. I finally got the bugs out of
              it
              > > and
              > > > now she is ready for the job of being converted to CNC.
              > > >
              > > > I need to start shopping for parts. I was thinking of the
              HobbyCNC
              > > > board but I am not sure exactly what steppers I should get. Will
              > > > around 280 in. of torque do the job? also what about the
              mounts?
              > > >
              > > > I would like to stick with the stock screws if I could for the
              mean
              > > time.
              > > >
              > > > Would it be better if I bought a kit to convert it? I would
              rather
              > > not
              > > > only because I believe putting this together from pieces will
              give
              > > me
              > > > a great wealth of knowledge on how it should be and why it has
              to be
              > > > that way. I have other projects down the road that I will be
              > > > fabricating so this is my educational learning curve.
              > > >
              > > > Thanks
              > > > Bill
              > > >
              > >
              >






              Food fight? Enjoy some healthy debate
              in the Yahoo! Answers Food & Drink Q&A.
            • Bill Kenny
              Mike, I need to pick your brain if I may, also can you send me an email as to how much for the roughed in parts and any of the other information you have?
              Message 6 of 29 , Mar 2, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                Mike,
                 I need to pick your brain if I may, also can you send me an email as to how much for the roughed in parts and any of the other information you have?

                Greatly appreciated!!!!!
                Bill

                On 3/2/07, Mike Gehring <hohum112@...> wrote:

                Hi Bill,   I'm roughing in the parts for the steele cnc Nema 23 motor conversion right now. You could actually make all the parts on the mill without a lathe (would make some easier) if you have the right materials, meaning not turning down 1" aluminum tube to 1/2" etc. Also you need a boring head for the mill to cut the center holes for the motor shaft and mounting etc. Actually, I could make you an offer on materials for this conversion if you're interested. NOT COMPLETED PARTS, Just close outlined for ALL PLATES and ROD material .  Would probably save you at least one days efforts just roughing in the raw stock ( actually conservative number, maybe 2 days work), not counting the time to acquire the materials.
                     You mentioned the vise. You'll need a workplat on your mill table, or blocks to clamp down to as one plate is almost 4" by 7" by 1/2" and a lot of 2.5" and 4"x4" VEE blocks maybe to hold tubes vertically for drill and tapping for the motor standoffs. Approximately 24 pieces to drill and tap after cutting to length.
                     You can buy motor to leadscrerw couplings or make them.(more cylinderical cutting drilling and tapping.)
                     If you'd like, I can give you a list of a few places with some of these parts, such as collars ,couplings micro switches at cheaper than ebay prices. You'll also need bearings, radial and thrust, and the z axis you may need a couple of XL TIMING BELT PULLEYS, Precision threaded rod and leadscrew  (Z AXIS OPTION) .
                     If you haven't noticed, this CNC CONVERSION  isn't going to happen overnight. In you're first post  "I'm  ready", you should rephrase to I'm getting ready and preparing to convert to CNC.
                     ALL this will keep you busy for a while. Looks like you're about 3 weeks to a month away from being almost done. And that might be too optomistic and hurried. You'll nee a big shoe box to stuff all this stuff in and power supplies and maybe cooling fan (S)
                     Steve is right about the stepper motors. Ray knew about my 425 in.. -Oz steppers at $52.00 each but he  REALLY didn't want to come up short on power.
                     Then again Steve is WRONG in his statement that his X3 is twice as powerful as the X2..  His X3 is only 1/2 as powerful and about the same weight as some X2's (that's not a typo,that's a fact) and I'll post some pic's tonite or tomorrow  showing proof.  (YES, the BIG BLUE X2 is TWICE as POWERFUL as the majoriy of the X3 mills.        Have a nice evening,   Mike G.

                ----- Original Message ----
                From: Bill Kenny < billcnc@...>
                To: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Friday, March 2, 2007 5:33:05 PM
                Subject: Re: [GrizHFMinimill] Re: Conversion Shopping Time!

                ??? OK Chris ???,

                Does anyone else know if the plans that littlemachinshop sells can be made on the X2 without having to change clamping positions a few times?

                Thanks
                Bill

                On 3/2/07, Chris Wood <chrisw@littlemachin eshop.com > wrote:

                Oops. I didn't read the message and thought I was answering a message about lathe chucks. I of course know nothing about their stock status.
                 
                Sorry,
                Chris Wood
                 
                LittleMachineShop. com
                The premier source of parts and accessories for mini lathes and mini mills.
                396 W. Washington Blvd. #500, Pasadena, CA 91103
                (800)981-9663 * Fax (626)797-7934


                From: GrizHFMinimill@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:GrizHFMinim ill@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Chris Wood
                Sent: Friday, March 02, 2007 8:58 AM
                To: GrizHFMinimill@ yahoogroups. com
                Subject: RE: [GrizHFMinimill] Re: Conversion Shopping Time!

                Things will get better this afternoon when we receive a shipment from China.
                 
                Regards,
                Chris Wood
                 
                LittleMachineShop. com
                The premier source of parts and accessories for mini lathes and mini mills.
                396 W. Washington Blvd. #500, Pasadena, CA 91103
                (800)981-9663 * Fax (626)797-7934


                From: GrizHFMinimill@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:GrizHFMinim ill@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Bill Kenny
                Sent: Thursday, March 01, 2007 8:30 PM
                To: GrizHFMinimill@ yahoogroups. com
                Subject: Re: [GrizHFMinimill] Re: Conversion Shopping Time!

                Just my luck, They are out of stock on EVERYTHING!

                On 3/1/07, Ray Livingston <jagboy1964@hotmail. com> wrote:

                Bill,
                The HobbyCNC is good for the price, but it will only drive
                unipolar motors, and is still limited to 3A, albeit at 42V. Bipolar
                motors will give you more torque - or, more correctly, running a
                motor in unipolar mode will give you about 30% less than the full
                rated torque for the motor, and will reduce your motor choices as
                you'll be ably to use only 6- or 8-wire motors. So, I wouldn't
                recommend it for this application. If money is really an issue, go
                to:
                http://www.thsengin eering.com/ products/ products. html
                These boards are functionally identical to Xylotex, and can be
                built for about $25 per axis. They have the same 30V/2.5A limitation
                as the Xylotex, but will drive bipolar motors.



                Regards,
                Ray L.

                --- In GrizHFMinimill@ yahoogroups. com, "Bill" <billcnc@...> wrote:
                >
                > Ray,
                >
                > Instead of the Gecko drives, What do you think of the hpbbyCNC
                drive?
                >
                > Thanks
                > Bill
                >
                > --- In GrizHFMinimill@ yahoogroups. com , "Ray Livingston"
                > <jagboy1964@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Bill,
                > >
                > > Though 280 oz-in motors will work OK with the stock
                leadscrews, I
                > > would suggest getting bigger motors, just in case you want to go
                to
                > > ballscrews later. You can get 500 oz-in motors for very little
                > > additional cost (about $60 per motor). I'd also get Gecko
                drives,
                > > instead of Xylotex, for the higher voltage and current
                capability.
                > > That'll give you not only more torque, but more speed. You can
                get
                > > the motors, drives, and power supply components from Rick LaLonde
                at
                > > homeshopcnc. com. He can also sell you ballscrews when you're
                ready.
                > > You can get conversion plans from a number of places, including
                from
                > > David at fignoggle.com, who's a regular on here, and very helpful.
                > >
                > > Regards,
                > > Ray L.
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In GrizHFMinimill@ yahoogroups. com, "Bill" <billcnc@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Alright, I am ready to do my shopping for the CNC conversion to
                the
                > > > X2. I have it torn completely apart and have given it the total
                > > > cleaning and tuning up the parts. I finally got the bugs out of
                it
                > > and
                > > > now she is ready for the job of being converted to CNC.
                > > >
                > > > I need to start shopping for parts. I was thinking of the
                HobbyCNC
                > > > board but I am not sure exactly what steppers I should get. Will
                > > > around 280 in. of torque do the job? also what about the
                mounts?
                > > >
                > > > I would like to stick with the stock screws if I could for the
                mean
                > > time.
                > > >
                > > > Would it be better if I bought a kit to convert it? I would
                rather
                > > not
                > > > only because I believe putting this together from pieces will
                give
                > > me
                > > > a great wealth of knowledge on how it should be and why it has
                to be
                > > > that way. I have other projects down the road that I will be
                > > > fabricating so this is my educational learning curve.
                > > >
                > > > Thanks
                > > > Bill
                > > >
                > >
                >






                Food fight? Enjoy some healthy debate
                in the Yahoo! Answers Food Drink Q&A.


              • steveh8861
                Ray, You have a very good point about using stronger steppers to allow tighter gibs. I did not even think about that :-). Steve
                Message 7 of 29 , Mar 2, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  Ray,
                  You have a very good point about using stronger steppers to allow
                  tighter gibs. I did not even think about that :-).
                  Steve


                  -- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "ppanda@..." <ppanda@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Steve,
                  > My logic is the 500 oz-in motors are all of about $10-15 more
                  > than the 269 oz-in motors, so why not get them? And I agree that
                  > with leadscrews, it's overkill (in fact, my first post said that).
                  > But with ballscrews, and nice tight gibs, the 500s are nice, and he
                  > might someday want to move up.
                  >
                  > Regards,
                  > Ray L.
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "steveh8861" <steveh8861@>
                  > wrote:
                  > >
                  > > HUH? 425's on a x2 is big power! Ray has super duper cryptonite
                  > power
                  > > on his x2 with 500's and geckos :-). Very cool to have I am sure,
                  > But
                  > > I would not say the x2 needs that kind of power. That's like a
                  > blown
                  > > big block stuffed in a Pinto.
                  > > 269's will work great on a x2 and in no way will cutting ability
                  > ever
                  > > be limited with them.
                  > >
                  > > I use 425's and a xylotex on my x3. I can run it at 100ipm but keep
                  > it
                  > > at 75IPM. Still way more power and speed than the x3 can use for
                  > > actual cutting. And the x3 is twice as powerful and heavy as the x2.
                  > >
                  > > Steppers and drives are the easy part.Pay your money and hook them
                  > > up. The thing that is going to make your cnc mill be a real
                  > performer
                  > > is accuracy and repeatability which also requires extreme low
                  > > backlash. Study up on bearing supports and methods to reduce
                  > backlash.
                  > > My x2 ran with .0025-.004" backlash which was not bad. My x3 is at
                  > > .0005" and let me tell you there is a world of difference with the
                  > > much lower backlash.
                  > > Steve
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Kenny" <billcnc@>
                  > wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > Cool so many choices, I just passed on some 425oz. steppers for
                  > 140
                  > > on ebay.
                  > > > It was hard but you guys tell me 500oz or more so thats what I
                  > will
                  > > get. So
                  > > > is a seperate board for each motor better than 1 board for all
                  > three?
                  > > >
                  > > > Thanks Guys :-)
                  > > > Bill
                  > > >
                  > > > On 3/2/07, Ray Livingston <jagboy1964@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Bill,
                  > > > > G320's for steppers. HomeshopCNC will sell them to you for, I
                  > > > > think, $90 each if you but the motors from them. That's where I
                  > got
                  > > > > mine.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Regards,
                  > > > > Ray L.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
                  > > <GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com>,
                  > > > > "Bill Kenny" <billcnc@>
                  > > > > wrote:
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > What gecko drives should I get?
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > On 3/1/07, Ray Livingston <jagboy1964@> wrote:
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > Reza,
                  > > > > > > First, you'd need two LMD18245s per motor, at about $15
                  > each.
                  > > > > > > Then you'll need a microprocessor to convert step/direction
                  > > > > controls
                  > > > > > > to the control signal timing to sequence the LMD18245s
                  > correctly,
                  > > > > > > especially for micro-stepping, which is pretty much
                  > required here.
                  > > > > > > You'll likely spend a fair amount of time on the firmware
                  > to get
                  > > > > them
                  > > > > > > working properly, and reliably. The PCB layout can be
                  > trickier
                  > > > > than
                  > > > > > > it appears, due to the highly inductive load of the motor
                  > coils. I
                  > > > > > > wouldn't bet on getting it right on the first attempt. Odds
                  > are
                  > > > > also
                  > > > > > > pretty good you'll fry a few LMD18245s before you're done.
                  > It's
                  > > > > do-
                  > > > > > > able, but it's non-trivial, and will take a considerable
                  > time
                  > > > > > > investment to get it fully sorted out. And you're still
                  > left with
                  > > > > a
                  > > > > > > 3A current limit, which may, or may not, be adequate. The
                  > *only*
                  > > > > > > advantage over the THStep is the higher voltage capability,
                  > which
                  > > > > is
                  > > > > > > really only of great value if you're concerned about higher
                  > > > > speeds.
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > Regards,
                  > > > > > > Ray L.
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > --- In
                  > > GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com<GrizHFMinimill%
                  > 40yahoogroups.com><GrizHFMinimill%
                  > > > > 40yahoogroups.com>,
                  > > > > > > Reza Naima <reza@> wrote:
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > how do these compare? I was thinking of designing a
                  > single pcb
                  > > > > to
                  > > > > > > use
                  > > > > > > > the same LMD18245 drivers, but setup to drive all 3-axis
                  > on one
                  > > > > > > pcb. I
                  > > > > > > > skimmed the datasheet, and it didn't look terribly
                  > difficult to
                  > > > > > > drive.
                  > > > > > > > However, I've never done work with steppers -- is it
                  > tricky?
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > I usually have PCBs made in lots of 5, so if anyone is
                  > > > > interested
                  > > > > > > in
                  > > > > > > > splitting the cost, let me know. Should run under $20 for
                  > a pcb
                  > > > > to
                  > > > > > > > handle 3 axis.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > reza
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > Ray Livingston wrote:
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > Bill,
                  > > > > > > > > The HobbyCNC is good for the price, but it will only
                  > drive
                  > > > > > > > > unipolar motors, and is still limited to 3A, albeit at
                  > 42V.
                  > > > > > > Bipolar
                  > > > > > > > > motors will give you more torque - or, more correctly,
                  > > > > running a
                  > > > > > > > > motor in unipolar mode will give you about 30% less
                  > than the
                  > > > > full
                  > > > > > > > > rated torque for the motor, and will reduce your motor
                  > > > > choices as
                  > > > > > > > > you'll be ably to use only 6- or 8-wire motors. So, I
                  > wouldn't
                  > > > > > > > > recommend it for this application. If money is really an
                  > > > > issue, go
                  > > > > > > > > to:
                  > > > > > > > > http://www.thsengineering.com/products/products.html
                  > > > > > > > > <http://www.thsengineering.com/products/products.html>
                  > > > > > > > > These boards are functionally identical to Xylotex, and
                  > can be
                  > > > > > > > > built for about $25 per axis. They have the same
                  > 30V/2.5A
                  > > > > > > limitation
                  > > > > > > > > as the Xylotex, but will drive bipolar motors.
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > Regards,
                  > > > > > > > > Ray L.
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > --- In
                  > > GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com<GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com>
                  > > > > <GrizHFMinimill%
                  > > > > 40yahoogroups.com>
                  > > > > > > > > <mailto:GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com>, "Bill"
                  > <billcnc@>
                  > > > > > > wrote:
                  > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > Ray,
                  > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > Instead of the Gecko drives, What do you think of the
                  > > > > hpbbyCNC
                  > > > > > > > > drive?
                  > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > Thanks
                  > > > > > > > > > Bill
                  > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > --- In
                  > > GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com<GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com>
                  > > > > <GrizHFMinimill%
                  > > > > 40yahoogroups.com>
                  > > > > > > > > <mailto:GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com>, "Ray
                  > Livingston"
                  > > > > > > > > > <jagboy1964@> wrote:
                  > > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > > Bill,
                  > > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > > Though 280 oz-in motors will work OK with the stock
                  > > > > > > > > leadscrews, I
                  > > > > > > > > > > would suggest getting bigger motors, just in case
                  > you
                  > > > > want to
                  > > > > > > go
                  > > > > > > > > to
                  > > > > > > > > > > ballscrews later. You can get 500 oz-in motors for
                  > very
                  > > > > little
                  > > > > > > > > > > additional cost (about $60 per motor). I'd also get
                  > Gecko
                  > > > > > > > > drives,
                  > > > > > > > > > > instead of Xylotex, for the higher voltage and
                  > current
                  > > > > > > > > capability.
                  > > > > > > > > > > That'll give you not only more torque, but more
                  > speed.
                  > > > > You can
                  > > > > > > > > get
                  > > > > > > > > > > the motors, drives, and power supply components
                  > from Rick
                  > > > > > > LaLonde
                  > > > > > > > > at
                  > > > > > > > > > > homeshopcnc.com. He can also sell you ballscrews
                  > when
                  > > > > you're
                  > > > > > > > > ready.
                  > > > > > > > > > > You can get conversion plans from a number of
                  > places,
                  > > > > > > including
                  > > > > > > > > from
                  > > > > > > > > > > David at fignoggle.com, who's a regular on here,
                  > and very
                  > > > > > > helpful.
                  > > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > > Regards,
                  > > > > > > > > > > Ray L.
                  > > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > > --- In
                  > > GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com<GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com>
                  > > > > <GrizHFMinimill%
                  > > > > 40yahoogroups.com>
                  > > > > > > > > <mailto:GrizHFMinimill%40yahoogroups.com>, "Bill"
                  > <billcnc@>
                  > > > > > > wrote:
                  > > > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > > > Alright, I am ready to do my shopping for the CNC
                  > > > > > > conversion to
                  > > > > > > > > the
                  > > > > > > > > > > > X2. I have it torn completely apart and have
                  > given it
                  > > > > the
                  > > > > > > total
                  > > > > > > > > > > > cleaning and tuning up the parts. I finally got
                  > the bugs
                  > > > > > > out of
                  > > > > > > > > it
                  > > > > > > > > > > and
                  > > > > > > > > > > > now she is ready for the job of being converted
                  > to CNC.
                  > > > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > > > I need to start shopping for parts. I was
                  > thinking of
                  > > > > the
                  > > > > > > > > HobbyCNC
                  > > > > > > > > > > > board but I am not sure exactly what steppers I
                  > should
                  > > > > get.
                  > > > > > > Will
                  > > > > > > > > > > > around 280 in. of torque do the job? also what
                  > about the
                  > > > > > > > > mounts?
                  > > > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > > > I would like to stick with the stock screws if I
                  > could
                  > > > > for
                  > > > > > > the
                  > > > > > > > > mean
                  > > > > > > > > > > time.
                  > > > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > > > Would it be better if I bought a kit to convert
                  > it? I
                  > > > > would
                  > > > > > > > > rather
                  > > > > > > > > > > not
                  > > > > > > > > > > > only because I believe putting this together from
                  > pieces
                  > > > > > > will
                  > > > > > > > > give
                  > > > > > > > > > > me
                  > > > > > > > > > > > a great wealth of knowledge on how it should be
                  > and why
                  > > > > it
                  > > > > > > has
                  > > > > > > > > to be
                  > > > > > > > > > > > that way. I have other projects down the road
                  > that I
                  > > > > will be
                  > > > > > > > > > > > fabricating so this is my educational learning
                  > curve.
                  > > > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > > > Thanks
                  > > > > > > > > > > > Bill
                  > > > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
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