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Re: Which belt conversion, LMS or Harrison or just get an X3?

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  • John Pitkin
    David, Don t make your decision based on those terrible sound clips. They sound like movies made with a cell phone camera. The audio is atrocious. I made my
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 28, 2007
      David,


      Don't make your decision based on those terrible sound clips. They
      sound like movies made with a cell phone camera. The audio is
      atrocious.

      I made my own belt drive and the effort is worth it for the noise
      reduction, alone. Believe me, the noise reduction is SIGNIFICANT!!!
      I own a decibel meter and I should have used it before and after to
      document the noise levels.

      But here's an experiment you can do on your mill. Run your mill with
      the gears and note the sound level. Then unbolt the motor. Now run
      the motor resting on the top on the mill with no gears engaged. All
      you hear is the motor. That's pretty close to what a belt drive
      sounds like. The faster the spindle turns the greater the noise
      reduction.

      I would go out on a limb to say all belt drives are about the same
      for noise reduction.

      The main reason I changed to belt drive was to eliminate the broken
      gear problem. Maybe you've never broken a gear, but I push my little
      mill pretty hard. I never worry about breaking gears with a belt
      drive any moreĀ…. That's because there are none.

      JP



      --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, David Patterson <odd_kins@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > I glad you posted the sound clips, I don't know if i just got a
      good one but my gear drive sounds more like the belt drive.
    • fuzzybeanerizer
      Hi. I ve been lurking here for a month or two. With that Harrison conversion, the low range goes from 0 to 2250. If I remember right, the conversion LMS sells
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 1, 2007
        Hi. I've been lurking here for a month or two.

        With that Harrison conversion, the low range goes from 0 to 2250. If
        I remember right, the conversion LMS sells is 0 to 1700 in low, and
        the stock gear drive is 0 to 1100 in low.

        You can't get speed without losing torque. The machine has torque to
        spare for most milling operations, but I run a 3/4" drill in mine
        with the stock gear drive -- very carefully -- and the torque now is
        very marginal. I put a reversing switch on mine for power tapping
        (half the fun of having a mill) and now it will run a 3/8"-16 tap in
        aluminum, but only a 5/16"-18 tap in steel.

        I'd LOVE to have a belt conversion, but I'm not willing to give up
        much torque so I'm sticking to gears for now. Maybe someday I'll make
        my own conversion with a huge spindle pulley, aiming for 0 to 1200
        rpm. The torque loss that would be inevitable with the Harrison
        conversion makes it out of the question for me.

        I'm new to the mini-mill, but I am a professional machinist. I need
        speeds over 2000 rpm like I need a hole in the head, in a manual
        machine. Give me the torque, thank you!
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