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OT: Please help me ID my vintage mill

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  • hinetdoc
    First off, an apology for this off topic post. I am more active on the 9X20 lathe site but I know this would be even more off topic there. I am asking anyone
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 2, 2007

      First off, an apology for this off topic post.  I am more active on the 9X20 lathe site but I know this would be even more off topic there.

      I am asking anyone who has any knowledge on the subject to help me identify the old ??1940's?? vintage mill I acquired a few months ago. 

      Please see "Denis's Mill" photo folder on this site for a few images of the mill.  I would gladly supply more if they would be helpful. 

      The mill has no trademark on it.  It does have the company that sold its tag on it.  That company was Reynolds Machinery in Cleveland, Ohio.  I did, of course, call them.  But they said they only had records dating back  beyond 25 years or so.  I asked a few experts, but they had no real help.  There is a plate on the lower right front side of the base that has "10M" and ½ HP on it.  But there is no manufacturer's name.

      I'd like to know who made it and when.   That might give me a chance to find out more about the innards of the machine and thus to know more about its care.  Does it have babbitt bearings or roller bearings?  What is the max safe spindle speed?  Is the AT-3 collet that is in it now original or a later addition?

      Any help will be appreciated.  This good old mill deserves to be well cared for.  It is a nice tight machine that still works well and is a pleasure to use.

      Thanks

      Denis in Bellingham, WA

       

    • Jim Barnes
      Denis, What you have there isn t a mill, it s a jig bore. It appears to be an Elliot jig bore. You can check out the write up on www.lathes.co.uk in the
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 3, 2007
        Denis,
        What you have there isn't a mill, it's a jig bore. It appears to be an
        Elliot jig bore. You can check out the write up on www.lathes.co.uk
        in the reference archive. Very nice condition.

        Regards
        Jim Barnes
      • Jim Barnes
        Denis, Sorry, it s a Vernon Jig Bore, not an Elliot. Oops! Had a brain malfunction while typing my previous post. Jim
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 3, 2007
          Denis,
          Sorry, it's a Vernon Jig Bore, not an Elliot. Oops! Had a brain
          malfunction while typing my previous post.

          Jim
        • viajoaquin@aol.com
          Denis, What you have is a Jig Borer rather than a milling machine. Amounts to the same thing, but very rigid and accurate and far beyond any Mini-Mill. Can t
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 3, 2007
            Denis,
            What you have is a Jig Borer rather than a milling machine. Amounts to the same thing, but very rigid and accurate and far beyond any Mini-Mill. Can't help you on a mabufacturer though.
            Roy 
             
             
            -----Original Message-----
            From: fotodoc@...
            To: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tue, 2 Jan 2007 7:54 PM
            Subject: [GrizHFMinimill] OT: Please help me ID my vintage mill

            First off, an apology for this off topic post.  I am more active on the 9X20 lathe site but I know this would be even more off topic there.
            I am asking anyone who has any knowledge on the subject to help me identify the old ??1940's?? vintage mill I acquired a few months ago. 
            Please see "Denis's Mill" photo folder on this site for a few images of the mill.  I would gladly supply more if they would be helpful. 
            The mill has no trademark on it.  It does have the company that sold its tag on it.  That company was Reynolds Machinery in Cleveland, Ohio.  I did, of course, call them.  But they said they only had records dating back  beyond 25 years or so.  I asked a few experts, but they had no real help.  There is a plate on the lower right front side of the base that has "10M" and ½ HP on it.  But there is no manufacturer's name.
            I'd like to know who made it and when.   That might give me a chance to find out more about the innards of the machine and thus to know more about its care.  Does it have babbitt bearings or roller bearings?  What is the max safe spindle speed?  Is the AT-3 collet that is in it now original or a later addition?
            Any help will be appreciated.  This good old mill deserves to be well cared for.  It is a nice tight machine that still works well and is a pleasure to use.
            Thanks
            Denis in Bellingham, WA
             

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          • hinetdoc
            Jim, Thank you so very much for identifying this machine for me. I am extrememly grateful. There can be no doubt that this is a correct identification. I am
            Message 5 of 9 , Jan 3, 2007
              Jim,

              Thank you so very much for identifying this machine for me. I am
              extrememly grateful. There can be no doubt that this is a correct
              identification.

              I am astounded at the utility of these forums. In the *old days* I
              doubt I would have figured this out in my lifetime. I will try to
              return the favor to some other soul when I have something useful to
              contribute.

              Denis


              --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Barnes" <uhrgerat@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Denis,
              > What you have there isn't a mill, it's a jig bore. It appears to be
              an
              > Elliot jig bore. You can check out the write up on www.lathes.co.uk
              > in the reference archive. Very nice condition.
              >
              > Regards
              > Jim Barnes
              >
            • tim0262000
              Okay I will bite. What is the difference between a mill and jig borer? Nice machine Denis. Tim ... to the same thing, but very rigid and accurate and far
              Message 6 of 9 , Jan 3, 2007
                Okay I will bite. What is the difference between a mill and jig borer?
                Nice machine Denis.
                Tim
                >
                > Denis,
                > What you have is a Jig Borer rather than a milling machine. Amounts
                to the same thing, but very rigid and accurate and far beyond any
                Mini-Mill. Can't help you on a mabufacturer though.
                > Roy
              • mardtrp
                ... borer? ... Usually, a milling machine, of the Bridgeport (or turret ) type, will have the table rising and falling on a knee, as well as the quill moving
                Message 7 of 9 , Jan 3, 2007
                  --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "tim0262000" <leix26@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > Okay I will bite. What is the difference between a mill and jig
                  borer?
                  >
                  Usually, a milling machine, of the Bridgeport (or turret ) type, will
                  have the table rising and falling on a knee, as well as the quill
                  moving up and down. A lot of different things to adjust for movement,
                  along with all this movement, deflection of the tool and chatter can
                  occur. A good design, but things can and do go wrong.
                  The older fixed head knee mills, only had the knee rising and
                  falling, a more rigid machine, but limited to what it was capable of
                  doing, compared to what a Bridgeport type machine can achieve.
                  A Jig borer is designed so the base and column are usually cast as a
                  one piece/unit, some of the smaller units like yours were cast as a
                  two piece, but still extremely RIDGID, with the head rising and
                  falling on this very rigid structure. Used mainly for extremely
                  accurate work as there is a very limited amount of deflection or
                  movement that can occur. An excellent machine to get hold of, even if
                  it is 40 yrs old. Check out this ebay link and have a good look at
                  the ways under the table and you'll soon see why they are an
                  excellent machine, I would just about trade my left #@$ for this
                  one.

                  E-bay ---- Item number: 150074685572

                  Jig Borers are still used extensivelly today in the motor reworking
                  industry, an excellent machine for reboring the motor block, where
                  accuracy is of the utmost importance.

                  Whilst typing this lot out, it just occurred to me, that the 'mini
                  mill' is actually a jig borer, WITHOUT the rigidity of the jig borer
                  design. Instead of a two piece column and base held together by one
                  bolt, imagine what this little machine would be capable of, if it
                  were cast as a one piece unit or a fixed upright head two piece unit.
                  Perhaps that member that was filling in the base around the column
                  bolt is onto something really good here. Possibly, if the whole
                  column was filled up as well, and the column made as rigid as it
                  could possibly be to the base, it would then be an excellent item.
                  Even bracing it, like some other members have done, they are all
                  doing something similar, for the same end result.
                  Hope this has answered your query, as this is what I was taught many
                  years ago, others will have differing opinions on this subject as
                  well.

                  Mark MDT
                • Barry Young
                  Nice post Mike. I agree 100% Barry Young Young Camera Company ... __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jan 4, 2007
                    Nice post Mike. I agree 100%

                    Barry Young
                    Young Camera Company


                    --- mardtrp <mardtrp@...> wrote:

                    > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "tim0262000"
                    > <leix26@...>
                    > wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Okay I will bite. What is the difference between a
                    > mill and jig
                    > borer?
                    > >
                    > Usually, a milling machine, of the Bridgeport (or
                    > turret ) type, will
                    > have the table rising and falling on a knee, as well
                    > as the quill
                    > moving up and down. A lot of different things to
                    > adjust for movement,
                    > along with all this movement, deflection of the tool
                    > and chatter can
                    > occur. A good design, but things can and do go
                    > wrong.
                    > The older fixed head knee mills, only had the knee
                    > rising and
                    > falling, a more rigid machine, but limited to what
                    > it was capable of
                    > doing, compared to what a Bridgeport type machine
                    > can achieve.
                    > A Jig borer is designed so the base and column are
                    > usually cast as a
                    > one piece/unit, some of the smaller units like yours
                    > were cast as a
                    > two piece, but still extremely RIDGID, with the head
                    > rising and
                    > falling on this very rigid structure. Used mainly
                    > for extremely
                    > accurate work as there is a very limited amount of
                    > deflection or
                    > movement that can occur. An excellent machine to get
                    > hold of, even if
                    > it is 40 yrs old. Check out this ebay link and have
                    > a good look at
                    > the ways under the table and you'll soon see why
                    > they are an
                    > excellent machine, I would just about trade my left
                    > #@$ for this
                    > one.
                    >
                    > E-bay ---- Item number: 150074685572
                    >
                    > Jig Borers are still used extensivelly today in the
                    > motor reworking
                    > industry, an excellent machine for reboring the
                    > motor block, where
                    > accuracy is of the utmost importance.
                    >
                    > Whilst typing this lot out, it just occurred to me,
                    > that the 'mini
                    > mill' is actually a jig borer, WITHOUT the rigidity
                    > of the jig borer
                    > design. Instead of a two piece column and base held
                    > together by one
                    > bolt, imagine what this little machine would be
                    > capable of, if it
                    > were cast as a one piece unit or a fixed upright
                    > head two piece unit.
                    > Perhaps that member that was filling in the base
                    > around the column
                    > bolt is onto something really good here. Possibly,
                    > if the whole
                    > column was filled up as well, and the column made
                    > as rigid as it
                    > could possibly be to the base, it would then be an
                    > excellent item.
                    > Even bracing it, like some other members have done,
                    > they are all
                    > doing something similar, for the same end result.
                    > Hope this has answered your query, as this is what I
                    > was taught many
                    > years ago, others will have differing opinions on
                    > this subject as
                    > well.
                    >
                    > Mark MDT
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    > (Yahoo! ID required)
                    >
                    > mailto:GrizHFMinimill-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
                    >
                    >
                    >


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                  • uhrgerat
                    To add to what s already been written, jig bores are wonderful machines! A friend has 2 Moore #1-1/2s and a Moore No2 Jig bore. It is absolutely amazing how
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jan 4, 2007
                      To add to what's already been written, jig bores
                      are wonderful machines! A friend has 2 Moore
                      #1-1/2s and a Moore No2 Jig bore. It is
                      absolutely amazing how smooth and accurate they
                      are even after maybe 40-50 years. They are the
                      Hardinge HLVH of the jig bore/mill world.

                      Regards
                      Jim B.

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