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Belt conversion help wanted - long

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  • Carl Trost
    I broke what I hope is the last plastic gear on my mill. I have started on the belt conversion. I decided to make it rather then buy it. It is a chance to do
    Message 1 of 35 , Aug 1, 2006
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      I broke what I hope is the last plastic gear on my mill. I have started
      on the belt conversion. I decided to make it rather then buy it. It is
      a chance to do some things I have never done before plus I had the
      materials on hand. I have the pulleys made. It went pretty well. I only
      made each one twice. I buggered up the small one on the final part off.
      I was looking for something or someone to hit after that little mishap.
      After doing the small pulley the second time with all I had learned
      from doing the first two I decided to make the large pulley over simply
      because I knew I could do a much better job with my new found skills
      and techniques. I learned a lot about using form tools, so it was very
      much worth the effort. With my mill being down I had planed on milling
      the base, motor mount, and spacers on the mill at work. I got the
      pieces all laid out and ready to go. I went into work only to find a
      note on the mill saying the drive had gone out. The way things are
      around there itt will be two months before they get parts and repair it.
      So I called grizzly and ordered two gears that I will promptly not need
      but at least I will get this done and be able to get on with the back
      log of projects that are on hold waiting for the mill to be repaired.

      I need help with a few of the details. First broaching the key ways. I
      am having trouble finding a broach set that will cut these perticular
      dimensions. I can not find a guide (probably using the wrong term, feel
      free to correct me) small enough for the motor pulley, period. I have a
      guide that fits the spindle pulley's hole but it's slot is made for
      cutting keyways much larger than I want to cut. I have heard of a down
      and dirty method of cutting keyways with the mill or a drill press but
      I am not sure I fully grasp the mechanics of how to do it. I have put
      to much time into the pulleys to screw them up on the final step. I
      could use a cutting keyways for dummies guide.

      Also am I to understand that once you have the belt conversion that you
      pull the spindle, drive shaft and then remove all of the plastic gears?
      If so what is the best way to accomplish this and what is the correct
      way (read with out damageing the shaft or bearings) to reassemble it?

      Thanks
      Carl
    • Trost Carl
      Nice idea. mounting a file in the QCTP and running it in and out to cut the key way. I have or have access to broaches for most sizes. It is just these small
      Message 35 of 35 , Aug 21, 2006
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        Nice idea. mounting a file in the QCTP and running it in and out to cut the key way. I have or have access to broaches for most sizes. It is just these small sizes in odd or diproportionate sized holes that I am having problems with. I have my belt drive up and running. It was simply amazing how many parts I was able to remove from the drive train. This is obviously where all the noise comes from. I wish my effort was a little prettier but it functions very well. I doubt anyone would notice the flaws but I do. It is the most complicated thing I have made to date. I am quite proud of it any way. Hope it holds up and performs as it should.
         
        Carl


        Jack <jacktarr68@...> wrote:
        Hey! Carl!

        3mm is close to 1/8 inch notta quarter!

        Small drills are required to flex. Lathe tool bits are not.

        Use a tool made from a (say) ground-to-measure 3/16 square or even
        5/16. OR use a 1/8 square pin file (or 1/8 thick rectangular) as a
        broach.

        Make a dedicated tool holder for whatever you choose.

        Keep overhang to just barely the required through dimension. Take
        light cuts. REPEAT each cut without changing the cross slide setting -
        maybe two or three times - before moving the cross slide.
        Jack

        --- In GrizHFMinimill@ yahoogroups. com, Trost Carl <czyhorse@.. .>
        wrote:
        >
        > I gave it a shot. I had a bit of a problem. The keyway I needed to
        make is 3mm. That is very close to 1/4" so I used a 1/4" bit. The
        problem is the bit flexes. It would make a good start into the metal
        but would push out as I advanced the cross slide into it. This is Al,
        it should not have been that hard. I tried grinding the bit to all
        kinds of angles, cutting edges and reliefs. But it was not real
        productive. By hook, crook and file I have it but it did not go
        nearly as well as I had hoped. I took very light cuts. .001 or .002
        at a time but about half way through it angled out and that was it.
        No matter how many times I tried to redo it. Should you drill a hole
        first so that you are more forming with the tool rather than taking
        the full cut?
        >
        > The new worm gear I got from Grizzly has a keyway that is WAY to
        deep (the second one, First one took out damn near my whole apron).
        Its a 3mm key and the keyway is cut 2.8 or 2.9mm deep. I was going to
        recut my own to the proper depth. I am going to bush it anyway so I
        figured no big deal if it has 2 keyways in it. The worm gear is much
        harder than the Al pulley I was cutting before. How do I keep the bit
        from flexing? I have not even found a 3mm broach. Kind of small.
        >
        > Carl
        >
        >
        > Barry Young <barryjyoung@ ...> wrote:
        > To use the link david provided, click it then delete
        > the > on the end of the URL.
        >
        > Barry Young
        > Young Camera Company
        >
        > --- figNoggle <david@...> wrote:
        >
        > >
        > > hi carl-
        > >
        > > here's a quick write-up of that. it's mostly a
        > > matter of workpiece and
        > > toolbit orientation (from vertical to horizontal) so
        > > that adjust the depth
        > > of cut for broaching is a matter of adjust the cross
        > > slide and not the
        > > toolbit height.
        > >
        > >
        > <http://www.fignoggl e.com/workshop/ item/2006/ 8/4/broaching- keyways-
        using-a-lathe>
        > > (if the url doesn't render in your email client,
        > > copy and paste them back
        > > together)
        > >
        > > btw, the sherline article is useful too.
        > >
        > > hope this helps!
        > >
        > > david
        > >
        > > (NEW!) MetalWorkingFAQ. NET - Your source for
        > > metalworking tips, tricks,
        > > and how-tos. Over 50 content sites!
        > > <http://www.metalwor kingfaq.net>
        > > ACME Screw & Acetal/Delrin Kit
        > > <http://www.fignoggl e.com/kits/ acmekit.htm>
        > > CNC Plans
        > > <http://www.fignoggl e.com/plans/ cncplans. htm> (DRO
        > > too)
        > >
        > > On Fri, 4 Aug 2006, Barry Young wrote:
        > >
        > > >
        > > > Hi Carl:
        > > >
        > > > Here is a link that may help. This link
        > > illustrates ONE way to
        > > > broach in the lathe. With multi tooth broaches.
        > > >
        > > > http://www.sherline .com/tip20. htm
        > > >
        > > > You can also use single point tools mounted on the
        > > cross slide as
        > > > has been discussed in this thread previously.
        > > >
        > > > Hope that helps.
        > > >
        > > > Barry Young
        > > > Young Camera Company
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --- In GrizHFMinimill@ yahoogroups. com, Trost Carl
        > > <czyhorse@>
        > > > wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > I was doing JUST FINE till right about NOW!
        > > > > What the heck did you say? More information
        > > please.
        > > > >
        > > > > Carl
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > figNoggle <david@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > oh, and what i described assumes the keyway is
        > > oriented top/bottom
        > > > as
        > > > > opposed to in/out when looking at the lathe from
        > > the front/handle
        > > > end.
        > > > >
        > > > > another way (without messing with toolholder
        > > height) is to broach
        > > > using
        > > > > the cross slide as your depth gauge.
        > > > >
        > > > > david
        > > > >
        > > > > (NEW!) MetalWorkingFAQ. NET - Your source for
        > > metalworking tips,
        > > > tricks,
        > > > > and how-tos. Over 50 content sites!
        > > > <http://www.metalwor kingfaq.net>
        > > > > CNC Plans
        > > <http://www.fignoggl e.com/plans/ cncplans. htm> (DRO
        > > too)
        > > > >
        > > > > On Thu, 3 Aug 2006, figNoggle wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > > larry, sounds right. to adjust the depth,
        > > you'll need to
        > > > incrementally
        > > > > > move the bit up/down. if you have the stock
        > > toolpost, you'll
        > > > have to shim.
        > > > > > otherwise with quick change tool posts (qctp),
        > > you just loosen
        > > > the holder
        > > > > > and adjust the height nut.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > as for the type of bit, i just ground mine to
        > > look like the
        > > > reliefs, etc.
        > > > > > of broaching bars albeit with just one tooth.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > hope this helps!
        > > > > >
        > > > > > david
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > > (NEW!) MetalWorkingFAQ. NET - Your source for
        > > metalworking tips,
        > > > tricks,
        > > > > > and how-tos. Over 50 content sites!
        > > > <http://www.metalwor kingfaq.net>
        > > > > > CNC Plans
        > > <http://www.fignoggl e.com/plans/ cncplans. htm> (DRO
        > > too)
        > > > > >
        > > > > > On Thu, 3 Aug 2006, Gonzalez, Larry P. (HSC)
        > > wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > > > Forgive my ignorance, but I am a total
        > > beginner at metal work.
        > > > I've
        > > > > > > only had my mini-lathe and mini-mill for a
        > > few weeks and have
        > > > no
        > > > > > > experience. I want to make sure I understand
        > > the suggestions
        > > > of how to
        > > > > > > do the keyway. If I have this right, the
        > > pulley is held in the
        > > > chuck of
        > > > > > > the lathe and a boring bit is used in the
        > > cross slide to
        > > > manually scrape
        > > > > > > the keyway by moving the cross slide in and
        > > out? If so, is
        > > > this a
        > > > > > > specially ground boring bit to be the width
        > > of the keyway?
        > > > And, how is
        > > > > > > the position of the bit adjusted to scrape
        > > the keyway to the
        > > > correct
        > > > > > > depth? If I am totally wrong here, could
        > > someone clear this up
        > > > for me?
        > > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > > GrizHFMinimill- unsubscribe@ yahoogroups. com
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
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