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Another DRO?

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  • rabeet00
    Any opinions on this DRO system? http://www.penntoolco.com/catalog/products/397.cfm
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 1, 2002
    • jjfear
      Mitotoyo makes very good stuff generally, but the scales for this unit are much too large for this mill. And it s only 2 axis. You can find 3 axis setups
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 1, 2002
        Mitotoyo makes very good stuff generally, but the scales for this unit
        are much too large for this mill. And it's only 2 axis. You can find
        3 axis setups sized more suitably for about the same price or less.
        And you will use the z-axis more than the other two, setting the depth
        of cut for each pass, etc.

        There has been some discussion on DRO's, brands, etc. on thi forum
        over time. Do a search through the archives and you will find good info.

        I will find immediately and post Rick Kruger's pictures of his 3-axis
        DRO set-up.


        --- In GrizHFMinimill@y..., "rabeet00" <rabeet00@y...> wrote:
        > Any opinions on this DRO system?
        >
        > http://www.penntoolco.com/catalog/products/397.cfm
      • Barry Young
        Ummmm, it costs too much? That is my opinion Barry Young ... __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Sports - sign up for
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 1, 2002
          Ummmm, it costs too much?

          That is my opinion

          Barry Young


          --- rabeet00 <rabeet00@...> wrote:
          > Any opinions on this DRO system?
          >
          > http://www.penntoolco.com/catalog/products/397.cfm
          >
          >
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        • w_r_miller2001
          The scales are too long. Unless they can be cut? I doubt it though. Bill M.
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 2, 2002
            The scales are too long. Unless they can be cut? I doubt it though.

            Bill M.


            --- In GrizHFMinimill@y..., "rabeet00" <rabeet00@y...> wrote:
            > Any opinions on this DRO system?
            >
            > http://www.penntoolco.com/catalog/products/397.cfm
          • fromday2
            ... unit ... find ... depth ... Snip I have thought about DRO s for the mill and considered only the X and Y axis, figuring that the Z axis would not be as
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 3, 2002
              --- In GrizHFMinimill@y..., "jjfear" <jjfear@i...> wrote:
              > Mitotoyo makes very good stuff generally, but the scales for this
              unit
              > are much too large for this mill. And it's only 2 axis. You can
              find
              > 3 axis setups sized more suitably for about the same price or less.
              > And you will use the z-axis more than the other two, setting the
              depth
              > of cut for each pass, etc.

              Snip

              I have thought about DRO's for the mill and considered only the X and
              Y axis, figuring that the Z axis would not be as useful. I have
              found that using shallow cuts to remove metal results in lots of
              chipped end mills and that by going deeper and using the side of the
              mill I get better results. I am mostly machining aluminum, hard
              bronze and titanium. I find my maximum Z axis cut is about .020
              (and .050 wide) in hard bronze. At this depth if I get any chatter,
              the endmill chips.

              I have been favoring going at the work from the side, say a cut .100
              deep and an X or Y axis cut of about .010 or .015 depending on if it
              is conventional or climb milling (this also depends on how tight the
              gibs are set). If I get a bit of chatter I at least do not get a
              chipped end mill.

              By the way, I think I am finding that M-42 end mills work best and I
              am having the worst luck with carbide, it is very good quality
              carbide but any chatter just kills it, I think my machine (Grizzly)
              is just not rigid enough.

              Also by-the-way, I am just beginning to use slitting saws to remove
              masses of metal. I am just amazed at how well they work when they
              can be used, they cut very fast and are much cheaper than end mills.
              They work really well on aluminum and plastics, quite well on hard
              bronze and not very well on titanium. Actually I have not tried one
              on steel yet but I think they will work well at low speed and with a
              little oil.

              Opinions anyone?

              Al Day,
              near Seattle
            • rabeet00
              I bought an arbor and saw myself and I am also using it as I can. Does work quite well. What I want is one of those on it s side. Kind of a more accurate cut
              Message 6 of 9 , Mar 3, 2002
                I bought an arbor and saw myself and I am also using it as I can.
                Does work quite well.

                What I want is one of those on it's side. Kind of a more accurate cut
                off saw. Of course once I have a band saw that will probably not be
                the case.

                I tend to use the sides of end mills as well, though many of the cuts
                I am doing right now are flat bottom holes. The only practical way I
                have found to make them is using an end mill. I have already chipped
                one TiN/HSS two flute on acrylic of all things.

                Of course if someone wants to enlighten me as to how one can make
                flat bottom holes by some other means, I'd be happy to hear it. Using
                the boring head dos not seem practical as I have found I cannot
                ensure anything resembling a decent finish at the bottom. I think
                what I need is a boring bar and lathe, but even then it will be tough
                as these are not round parts.

                Ed


                <snip>
                > Also by-the-way, I am just beginning to use slitting saws to remove
                > masses of metal. I am just amazed at how well they work when they
                > can be used, they cut very fast and are much cheaper than end
                mills.
                > They work really well on aluminum and plastics, quite well on hard
                > bronze and not very well on titanium. Actually I have not tried
                one
                > on steel yet but I think they will work well at low speed and with
                a
                > little oil.
                >
                > Opinions anyone?
                >
                > Al Day,
                > near Seattle
              • Barry Young
                Hi Al: Slitting saws do work well in steel. You are correct in wanting to go slow and use a lube. Preferably something high temp and high pressure. There are
                Message 7 of 9 , Mar 4, 2002
                  Hi Al:

                  Slitting saws do work well in steel. You are correct
                  in wanting to go slow and use a lube. Preferably
                  something high temp and high pressure. There are many
                  lubes out there that cannot take the pressure. I
                  reccomend Accu-Lube and Emuge. You have to go even
                  slower in Ti. As slow as you can. But then you MUST
                  keep the feed rate up, if you don't, it will work
                  harden in an instant.

                  You may have chipping problems with end mills because
                  of too high a speed or not enough feedrate.

                  Barry Young


                  --- fromday2 <aldayis@...> wrote:
                  > --- In GrizHFMinimill@y..., "jjfear" <jjfear@i...>
                  > wrote:
                  > > Mitotoyo makes very good stuff generally, but the
                  > scales for this
                  > unit
                  > > are much too large for this mill. And it's only 2
                  > axis. You can
                  > find
                  > > 3 axis setups sized more suitably for about the
                  > same price or less.
                  > > And you will use the z-axis more than the other
                  > two, setting the
                  > depth
                  > > of cut for each pass, etc.
                  >
                  > Snip
                  >
                  > I have thought about DRO's for the mill and
                  > considered only the X and
                  > Y axis, figuring that the Z axis would not be as
                  > useful. I have
                  > found that using shallow cuts to remove metal
                  > results in lots of
                  > chipped end mills and that by going deeper and using
                  > the side of the
                  > mill I get better results. I am mostly machining
                  > aluminum, hard
                  > bronze and titanium. I find my maximum Z axis cut
                  > is about .020
                  > (and .050 wide) in hard bronze. At this depth if I
                  > get any chatter,
                  > the endmill chips.
                  >
                  > I have been favoring going at the work from the
                  > side, say a cut .100
                  > deep and an X or Y axis cut of about .010 or .015
                  > depending on if it
                  > is conventional or climb milling (this also depends
                  > on how tight the
                  > gibs are set). If I get a bit of chatter I at least
                  > do not get a
                  > chipped end mill.
                  >
                  > By the way, I think I am finding that M-42 end mills
                  > work best and I
                  > am having the worst luck with carbide, it is very
                  > good quality
                  > carbide but any chatter just kills it, I think my
                  > machine (Grizzly)
                  > is just not rigid enough.
                  >
                  > Also by-the-way, I am just beginning to use slitting
                  > saws to remove
                  > masses of metal. I am just amazed at how well they
                  > work when they
                  > can be used, they cut very fast and are much cheaper
                  > than end mills.
                  > They work really well on aluminum and plastics,
                  > quite well on hard
                  > bronze and not very well on titanium. Actually I
                  > have not tried one
                  > on steel yet but I think they will work well at low
                  > speed and with a
                  > little oil.
                  >
                  > Opinions anyone?
                  >
                  > Al Day,
                  > near Seattle
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                  >
                  > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > GrizHFMinimill-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                  > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  >
                  >


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                • jjfear
                  Ed, some endmills are designed to center cut (that is drill) and some are not. In most catalogs they are listed as center cutting. If not so designated
                  Message 8 of 9 , Mar 5, 2002
                    Ed, some endmills are designed to center cut (that is drill) and some
                    are not. In most catalogs they are listed as "center cutting." If
                    not so designated they are probably not designed to plunge cut. That
                    may be your problem, even in acrylic.


                    -- In GrizHFMinimill@y..., "rabeet00" <rabeet00@y...> wrote:
                    > I bought an arbor and saw myself and I am also using it as I can.
                    > Does work quite well.
                    >
                    > What I want is one of those on it's side. Kind of a more accurate cut
                    > off saw. Of course once I have a band saw that will probably not be
                    > the case.
                    >
                    > I tend to use the sides of end mills as well, though many of the cuts
                    > I am doing right now are flat bottom holes. The only practical way I
                    > have found to make them is using an end mill. I have already chipped
                    > one TiN/HSS two flute on acrylic of all things.
                    >
                    > Of course if someone wants to enlighten me as to how one can make
                    > flat bottom holes by some other means, I'd be happy to hear it. Using
                    > the boring head dos not seem practical as I have found I cannot
                    > ensure anything resembling a decent finish at the bottom. I think
                    > what I need is a boring bar and lathe, but even then it will be tough
                    > as these are not round parts.
                    >
                    > Ed
                    >
                    >
                    > <snip>
                    > > Also by-the-way, I am just beginning to use slitting saws to remove
                    > > masses of metal. I am just amazed at how well they work when they
                    > > can be used, they cut very fast and are much cheaper than end
                    > mills.
                    > > They work really well on aluminum and plastics, quite well on hard
                    > > bronze and not very well on titanium. Actually I have not tried
                    > one
                    > > on steel yet but I think they will work well at low speed and with
                    > a
                    > > little oil.
                    > >
                    > > Opinions anyone?
                    > >
                    > > Al Day,
                    > > near Seattle
                  • rabeet00
                    These are definitely center cutting. I finally found some information though, on Sherline s web site. They suggest using a rotary table and smaller endmill. My
                    Message 9 of 9 , Mar 5, 2002
                      These are definitely center cutting.

                      I finally found some information though, on Sherline's web site. They
                      suggest using a rotary table and smaller endmill.

                      My problems are probably that I am using too large cutters for this
                      mill (~1"). That, and acrylic seems to require extremely sharp
                      cutters or things go quickly awry.

                      Ed

                      > Ed, some endmills are designed to center cut (that is drill) and
                      some
                      > are not. In most catalogs they are listed as "center cutting." If
                      > not so designated they are probably not designed to plunge cut.
                      That
                      > may be your problem, even in acrylic.
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