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Re: [GrizHFMinimill] Is there a way to?

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  • ken.mary
    The table should not be jumping at all. Have you recently snuged up the gibs? Is the gear train intact? How out of balance is the tool? What is the RPM?
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 12, 2005
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      The table should not be jumping at all. Have you recently snuged up the
      gibs? Is the gear train intact? How out of balance is the tool? What is
      the RPM? What is the radius of the tool at the cutting point? Is the
      object held very firmly? Is the tool damaged or very dull? Is the spindle
      preload correct?

      Not a complete list, but a start.

      Bye, Ken in Carmichael
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "wideawakenightmare111" <wideawakenightmare111@...>
      To: <GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, February 12, 2005 8:38 PM
      Subject: [GrizHFMinimill] Is there a way to?




      is there a way to stop the table from jumping so much when taking
      larger cuts or even the vibration. just curious







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    • dswr@webtv.net
      is there a way to stop the table from jumping so much when taking larger cuts or even the vibration. just curious Hard to say, not knowing how the table
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 13, 2005
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        "is there a way to stop the table from jumping so much when taking
        larger cuts or even the vibration. just curious"

        Hard to say, not knowing how the table jumps... up and down? forward or
        backward? sideways?

        What is a larger cut? How deep? How wide? What material being cut?

        All the gibs on the slides should be properly adjusted. All slides,
        except the one used for feeding, should be locked down.

        The table feed should be in the conventional direction.

        Can you give more detail of your operation where the jumping occurred?

        Leo (pearland, tx)
      • German Bravo
        I don t know how much you are saying with vibration and larger cuts, but in my Grizzly Minimill I have improved a lot the rigidity with column filling and
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 13, 2005
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          I don't know how much you are saying with vibration and larger cuts,
          but in my Grizzly Minimill I have improved a lot the rigidity with
          column filling and column base reinforced.

          Lapping ways and change screws also help.

          In my experience the most important point for rigidity improvement
          and vibration reduction was the column base reinforcement.

          Regard,
          German
        • Ron
          Hello I agree with all of the other folks who have responded to this thread. I would just add that you should buy some roughing endmills to use for heavier
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 13, 2005
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            Hello

            I agree with all of the other folks who have responded to this
            thread. I would just add that you should buy some roughing endmills
            to use for heavier milling operations. Roughing endmills leave a
            rough finish but are easier on the machine and machine through meatal
            faster than standard flute endmills. They also create less heat and
            are great for use in CNC mills. 3/8 inch diameter is a good size to
            experiment with if you want to give one a try.

            Regards,

            Ron Steele
            http://www.stirlingsteele.com/millplans.html

            ===============================================
            --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "wideawakenightmare111"
            <wideawakenightmare111@y...> wrote:
            >
            > is there a way to stop the table from jumping so much when taking
            > larger cuts or even the vibration. just curious
          • cyberace10242003
            Lots of good suggestions in this thread. To put them into a logical order (based on my sorry experience) I d suggest the following: 1. Always lock the axis
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 13, 2005
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              Lots of good suggestions in this thread. To put them into a logical
              order (based on my sorry experience) I'd suggest the following:
              1. Always lock the axis you aren't moving. Use a sharp end-mill.
              Stick to a two-flute end-mill when cutting anything that resembles
              a "deep" slot.
              2. Check the gibs. There shouldn't be any "slop" when you grab
              your "x" table at the ends and "twist" it. And, when you look "end
              on" at the gibs they should be "flat" against the dovetail. I chased
              this problem (chatter in the table) for weeks until I noticed that
              the gib on the "x" axis was riding against the top "edge" of the
              dovetail. I solved the problem by pointing the end of the gib screws
              so that they pressed evenly against the middle of the gib.
              3. Check the lead-screws for end-play and backlash. If you have
              more that .005" of backlash on your "x" or "y", the nut (under the
              table) is probably loose. You have to disassemble the table and
              tighten the nut. Then you can align the lead screw and adjust the
              jam-nuts at the handle to eliminate the end-play. It takes a bit of
              fiddling, but sounds harder than it is.
              4. At this point, you've got the table apart anyway so you might as
              well "lap" the gibs. It helps the table work smoother, and you can
              adjust the gibs tighter without wearing out your arm. Use plenty of
              lubrication when you put it back together.
              5. If you hear "clicking" when you run the spindle under light load,
              check for broken gears. I've broken two sets (before I discovered
              the "fixes" described above). A broken (or even cracked) gear will
              make the table jump all over the place, even with a good end-mill.

              With the above fixes, and a little hard-won experience, and careful
              selection of cutting tools, I've learned to get good results (even on
              1018 CRS) without resorting (yet) to the more drastic step of
              stiffening the column.

              Good luck, let us know if any of these ideas help.
              Steve


              --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "wideawakenightmare111"
              <wideawakenightmare111@y...> wrote:
              >
              > is there a way to stop the table from jumping so much when taking
              > larger cuts or even the vibration. just curious
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