Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

anyone sells brass gibs or tapered gibs for X2?

Expand Messages
  • bksaccount
    Hi all, i d like to get a new set of gibs for my X2 but I don t have another mill to work on it myself. Does anyone sell them?
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 7, 2014
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi all, i'd like to get a new set of gibs for my X2 but I don't have another mill to work on it myself.  Does anyone sell them?
    • markkimball2000
      LMS sells steel gibs, no dimples. I have not seen X2 brass gibs for sale. I made some for myself but the OEM gibs were OK enough to do that. See Figgnoggle
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 7, 2014
      • 0 Attachment
        LMS sells steel gibs, no dimples.  I have not seen X2 brass gibs for sale.  I made some for myself but the OEM gibs were OK enough to do that.  See Figgnoggle for a drawing of a gib making fixture.  I used a scrap piece of brass sheet to keep the mounting screws from marring the surface of the gib. 

        Since the locations of the gib screws seems to be pretty variable you need to make the dimples to fit your particular machine.  Make sure the gib doesn't foul the opposing dovetail before making the dimples.

        As for tapered gibs on these machines, that is a totally DIY thing.   There are some pix in the Photos section that show a tapered gib mod but none of the dirty details seem to be available.  Looks like a couple of retainer blocks at either end of the dovetail, probably with screws to push the tapered gibs together.  One of those "projects without words" things I guess.

        There are some pretty good descriptions of putting tapered gibs on the mini-lathe saddle, could start there for some ideas.

        Mark
      • greenham.dave
        If you want brass gibs instead of steel. Then Arceurotrade sell them. But you will still need to lap them in. Dave. U.K.
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 7, 2014
        • 0 Attachment
          If you want brass gibs instead of steel. Then Arceurotrade sell them. But you will still need to lap them in.Dave. U.K.
        • John Lindo
          Hello Dave. Agree that the gibs need to be flat,but not lapped unless you intend to finish the job and scrape both surfaces both gib and running edge of the
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 7, 2014
          • 0 Attachment
            Hello Dave.
            Agree that the gibs need to be flat,but not lapped unless you intend to finish the job
            and scrape both surfaces both gib and running edge of the machined vee.
            If not they will tend to "RING" (stick) together as similar to a slip gauges,and also you have no areas or pockets for the oil 
            to be trapped between the surfaces for lubrication.
            Ideal material is not brass but phosphor bronze and or cast iron because of the materials inherent lubricity
            content and durability.
            I worked for many years building thread grinders and jig borers,this was how it was done as follows.
            The machine beds (cast iron ) were first milled after 2 years outside weathering,then all surfaces 
            including the vees were surface ground and finally scraped to there mating running parts.
            John
            Spain.  
            On Monday, April 7, 2014 10:10 PM, "davegreenham@..." <davegreenham@...> wrote:
             
            If you want brass gibs instead of steel. Then Arceurotrade sell them. But you will still need to lap them in.Dave. U.K.


          • Eitan Tsur
            I made my own from brass rectangular stock on the mill for my lathe; the final cuts were barely held because of the cross-section. Protip: Don t mill the gibs
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 7, 2014
            • 0 Attachment
              I made my own from brass rectangular stock on the mill for my lathe; the final cuts were barely held because of the cross-section.  Protip: Don't mill the gibs to the same dimensions as the originals.  Mill them to the right angles for the vee on your machine, and mill them to fill as much void as possible, while still having enough free space to reasonably easily slide into their resting place.  If you don't they'll be super tiny and very difficult to mill, even with an angle plate and vise.  They will also be less likely to deform over time if they are thicker.


              On Mon, Apr 7, 2014 at 9:57 PM, John Lindo <bechetboat@...> wrote:
               

              Hello Dave.
              Agree that the gibs need to be flat,but not lapped unless you intend to finish the job
              and scrape both surfaces both gib and running edge of the machined vee.
              If not they will tend to "RING" (stick) together as similar to a slip gauges,and also you have no areas or pockets for the oil 
              to be trapped between the surfaces for lubrication.
              Ideal material is not brass but phosphor bronze and or cast iron because of the materials inherent lubricity
              content and durability.
              I worked for many years building thread grinders and jig borers,this was how it was done as follows.
              The machine beds (cast iron ) were first milled after 2 years outside weathering,then all surfaces 
              including the vees were surface ground and finally scraped to there mating running parts.
              John
              Spain.  
              On Monday, April 7, 2014 10:10 PM, "davegreenham@..." <davegreenham@...> wrote:
               
              If you want brass gibs instead of steel. Then Arceurotrade sell them. But you will still need to lap them in.Dave. U.K.



            • John Lindo
              On Tuesday, April 8, 2014 6:57 AM, John Lindo wrote: Hello Dave. ... Then Arceurotrade sell them. But you will still need to lap them
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 7, 2014
              • 0 Attachment
                On Tuesday, April 8, 2014 6:57 AM, John Lindo <bechetboat@...> wrote:
                Hello Dave.
                Agree that the gibs need to be flat,but not lapped unless you intend to finish the job
                and scrape both surfaces both gib and running edge of the machined vee.
                If not they will tend to "RING" (stick) together as similar to a slip gauges,and also you have no areas or pockets for the oil 
                to be trapped between the surfaces for lubrication.
                Ideal material is not brass but phosphor bronze and or cast iron because of the materials inherent lubricity
                content and durability.
                I worked for many years building thread grinders and jig borers,this was how it was done as follows.
                The machine beds (cast iron ) were first milled after 2 years outside weathering,then all surfaces 
                including the vees were surface ground and finally scraped to there mating running parts.
                John
                Spain.  
                On Monday, April 7, 2014 10:10 PM, "davegreenham@..." <davegreenham@...> wrote:
                 
                If you want brass gibs instead of steel. Then Arceurotrade sell them. But you will still need to lap them in.Dave. U.K.




              • John Lindo
                Try this link,I think the other failed. photo should show scraped lathe x slide,oil grooves and reservoirs with felt absorbing pads.
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 7, 2014
                • 0 Attachment
                  Try this link,I think the other failed.
                  photo should show scraped lathe x slide,oil grooves and reservoirs with felt absorbing pads.

                  <  https://plus.google.com/photos/112848589944601328801/albums/5760796018680783985/5760796176683653554?pid=5760796176683653554&oid=112848589944601328801 >
                  John
                  On Tuesday, April 8, 2014 7:25 a.m., John Lindo <bechetboat@...> wrote:

                   
                  On Tuesday, April 8, 2014 6:57 a.m., John Lindo <bechetboat@...> wrote:
                  Hello Dave.
                  Agree That the gibs need to be flat, but not lapped Unless you Intend to finish the job
                  Both surfaces and scrape Both gib and running edge of the machined vee.
                  If They Will not outstretch to "RING" (stick) together as similar to a slip gauges, And Also you have no pockets or areas for the oil 
                  to be trapped Between the surfaces for lubrication.
                  Ideal Material is brass but not phosphor bronze and cast iron or materials Because of the inherent lubricity
                  content and durability.
                  I worked for many years building thread grinders and jig borers, I this was how it was done as follows.
                  The machine beds (cast iron) Were first milled outside weathering after 2 years, then all surfaces 
                  Were vees including the ground surface and finally scraped running to there mating parts.
                  John
                  Spain.  
                  On Monday, April 7, 2014 10:10 PM, "davegreenham@..." <davegreenham@...> wrote:
                   
                  If you want brass gibs instead of steel. Then Arceurotrade sell them. But you will still need to lap them in. Dave. UK




                  .

                  __, _._, ___


                • Hannu Venermo
                  John is right - this is how it was done, in the old days. Todays, everyone machines the surfaces flat, and bolts on linear guides. Its faster, more accurate,
                  Message 8 of 9 , Apr 8, 2014
                  • 0 Attachment
                    John is right - this is how it was done, in the old days.
                    Todays, everyone machines the surfaces flat, and bolts on linear guides.

                    Its faster, more accurate, cheaper, easier and better.
                    Castings are not aged anymore.
                    They go through an oven (heat treat cycle) and the process is done.

                    99% of all industrial machines use linear guides only.
                    No-one uses gibs, today, industrially.

                    The gib materials of choice are phospor bronze, cast iron, brass, in
                    this order.

                    Scraping can ahieve about 5 microns accuracy. Dpeth of scrape is
                    supposed to be about 5 microns.
                    Linear guides to 1-3 microns, for about 1/20 the cost (in work hours
                    mostly).

                    Flat gib (no oil pockets) strips would work fine, if using pressurised
                    lubrication, or hydrostatic bearings.
                    This is how auto engines work, and some old lathes, known for excellent
                    finishes.

                    Some old lathes used straight cast iron for bearings, and worked fine.

                    On 08/04/2014 06:57, John Lindo wrote:
                    > The machine beds (cast iron ) were first milled after 2 years outside
                    > weathering,then all surfaces
                    > including the vees were surface ground and finally scraped to there
                    > mating running parts.

                    --
                    -hanermo (cnc designs)
                  • Hannu Venermo
                    A slight, but important correction. Lapping is not actually sanding against a plate. Lapping is using an abrasive embedded in a soft material, to wear the hard
                    Message 9 of 9 , Apr 8, 2014
                    • 0 Attachment
                      A slight, but important correction.
                      Lapping is not actually sanding against a plate.

                      Lapping is using an abrasive embedded in a soft material, to wear the
                      hard material.

                      Using SC sandpaper and water on a surface plate is not truly lapping,
                      although it gets you a semi-flat, with raised edges and a banana shape
                      that is somewhat smooth and flattish.
                      And yes, I agree its better than stock.

                      But it is not flat because of the raised edges, and the process is not
                      truly lapping.

                      I built a brass lap, and will use it to wear the hardened and ground
                      spindle surface down, with abrasive diamond compund.
                      I expect to remove about 2-3 microns from the surface, using lapping.
                      (Current TIR is 2 microns, and size is 25.002 mm. I need to remove the
                      0.002 mm, or 2 microns).


                      On 08/04/2014 07:25, John Lindo wrote:
                      > If you want brass gibs instead of steel. Then Arceurotrade sell them.
                      > But you will still need to lap them in. Dave. U.K.

                      --
                      -hanermo (cnc designs)
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.