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Does anyone sell better X2 gibs?

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  • bksaccount
    Hi all, I m looking to replace the gibs on my X2 with something better, I don t have access to another mill to make my own, so I m looking to buy. Does anyone
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 6, 2014
      Hi all,
      I'm looking to replace the gibs on my X2 with something better, I don't have access to another mill to make my own, so I'm looking to buy.  Does anyone know where I might be able to buy them?

      thanks
    • Ian 1
      Hi, You do not need a mill - you only need a file. All the best, Ian
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 7, 2014
        Hi,

        You do not need a mill - you only need a file.

        All the best,
        Ian

        On 7 Apr 2014, at 07:25, <bksaccount@...> wrote:

         

        Hi all,
        I'm looking to replace the gibs on my X2 with something better, I don't have access to another mill to make my own, so I'm looking to buy.  Does anyone know where I might be able to buy them?

        thanks

      • Hannu Venermo
        Gibs should be straight, as in a planar surface whether tapered or not, with less than 0.01 to 0.02 mm variation trending to less, hope fullymuch less (5
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 7, 2014
          Gibs should be straight, as in a planar surface whether tapered or not, with less than 0.01 to 0.02 mm variation trending to less, hope fullymuch less (5 microns).

          How do you file something uniformly ?

          Scraping is possible, but seems a monumental waste of time to me.
          And a manual technique, with little real application in todays world.
          (Yes, of course, you can rebuild a machine tool with a pocketful of tools and a surface plate, but still ..)

          Seriously, is it somehow possible to file something to a uniform linear surface ?
          Any videos, examples, pics, stories that anyone has actually done this over a surface longer than 100 mm ?

          Am just ordering foundations of mechnical accuracy, and I bet they dont and did not file anything.
          And have almost finished my brass lap .. and cen then test it with (diamond) lapping compound.


          On 07/04/2014 16:15, Ian 1 wrote:
           
          Hi,

          You do not need a mill - you only need a file.

          All the best,
          Ian
          _

          -- 
          -hanermo (cnc designs)
          
        • Rob Yates
          As a relatively new user of these mills, I m curious to know what makes a gib better or are you just replacing them because of wear? Are they not true in
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 7, 2014
            As a relatively new user of these mills, I'm curious to know what makes a gib "better" or are you just replacing them because of wear?  Are they not true in some way?

            -Rob

            On Apr 7, 2014, at 2:25 AM, <bksaccount@...> wrote:

             

            Hi all,
            I'm looking to replace the gibs on my X2 with something better, I don't have access to another mill to make my own, so I'm looking to buy.  Does anyone know where I might be able to buy them?

            thanks

          • Ian 1
            Hi Hannu, I should have given a better explanation - I was referring to the use of a file to cut the edges of the gib stock to 60 degrees. Regarding the full
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 7, 2014
              Hi Hannu,

              I should have given a better explanation - I was referring to the use of a file to cut the edges of the gib stock to 60 degrees. 

              Regarding the full process:
              Ideally, gibs should be made from hardened steel (a soft material such as brass should be avoided), but for the amount of use a hobby machine gets, you will find normal high carbon steel is fine.

              A piece of ground steel stock will be flat enough - it is beneficial to scrape the gib in order to retain on oil film, not for issues of flatness, and lapping is unnecessary (and in fact should be avoided as it reduces the retention of lubrication).

              If flatness is an issue (if existing gibs are warped or distorted for example) the gibs can be flattened by rubbing over a sheet of emery paper held on top of a piece of plate glass.

              Surface flatness to within five microns is not required.

              All the best,
              Ian

              On 7 Apr 2014, at 15:26, Hannu Venermo <gcode.fi@...> wrote:

               

              Gibs should be straight, as in a planar surface whether tapered or not, with less than 0.01 to 0.02 mm variation trending to less, hope fullymuch less (5 microns).

              How do you file something uniformly ?

              Scraping is possible, but seems a monumental waste of time to me.
              And a manual technique, with little real application in todays world.
              (Yes, of course, you can rebuild a machine tool with a pocketful of tools and a surface plate, but still ..)

              Seriously, is it somehow possible to file something to a uniform linear surface ?
              Any videos, examples, pics, stories that anyone has actually done this over a surface longer than 100 mm ?

              Am just ordering foundations of mechnical accuracy, and I bet they dont and did not file anything.
              And have almost finished my brass lap .. and cen then test it with (diamond) lapping compound.


              On 07/04/2014 16:15, Ian 1 wrote:
               
              Hi,

              You do not need a mill - you only need a file.

              All the best,
              Ian
              _

              -- 
              -hanermo (cnc designs)
              

            • markkimball2000
              Ian s comment on using hardened gibs may seem backwards, but in general when two dissimilar materials move across each other the hardest one wears faster.
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 7, 2014
                Ian's comment on using hardened gibs may seem backwards, but in general when two dissimilar materials move across each other the hardest one wears faster.  Grit and abrasives bed into the softer metal so it becomes, in effect, like a piece of sandpaper.  Cast iron is softer than hardened steel so the gib, which is easily replaceable, should wear more than the less-easily replaced (or remachined) cast iron dovetails.  Anyone for glass gibs ?

                Makes me think more about those brass gibs I made.  Should I worry?  On the other hand, I have not seen any comments that brass was a terrible choice for a gib.  For hobbyists the differences may not be noticeable.  And I AM a hobbyist, still on the steep part of the learning curve.  But my take on the relative hardness of materials and wear is based on direct on-the-job experience.

                Mark
              • John Lindo
                Adding to my last post,this is what I did to my lathe,unfortunately the phosphor bronze gibs are not in the picture. Note,scraped faces,oil grooves,oil
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 7, 2014
                  Adding to my last post,this is what I did to my lathe,unfortunately the phosphor bronze gibs are not in the picture.
                  Note,scraped faces,oil grooves,oil reservoirs with felt pads to absorb the oil and distribute when the slide is moving.

                  < https://plus.google.com/photos/112848589944601328801/albums/5760796018680783985/5760796176683653554?pid=5760796176683653554&oid=112848589944601328801 >

                  Grinding compounds are a no/no,on running surfaces,you can never 100% wash it off especially on cast iron.

                  John
                  Spain

                  On Tuesday, April 8, 2014 7:13 AM, "mark.kimball2@..." <mark.kimball2@...> wrote:
                   
                  Ian's comment on using hardened gibs may seem backwards, but in general when two dissimilar materials move across each other the hardest one wears faster.  Grit and abrasives bed into the softer metal so it becomes, in effect, like a piece of sandpaper.  Cast iron is softer than hardened steel so the gib, which is easily replaceable, should wear more than the less-easily replaced (or remachined) cast iron dovetails.  Anyone for glass gibs ?

                  Makes me think more about those brass gibs I made.  Should I worry?  On the other hand, I have not seen any comments that brass was a terrible choice for a gib.  For hobbyists the differences may not be noticeable.  And I AM a hobbyist, still on the steep part of the learning curve.  But my take on the relative hardness of materials and wear is based on direct on-the-job experience.

                  Mark


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