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HF Mini Mill - Help - CT

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  • zild1221
    I was wondering if you guys could help me. I have a HF Mini mill that I got for almost free. It has almost no hours on it, but has surface oxidation due to
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 30 12:11 AM
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      I was wondering if you guys could help me. I have a HF Mini mill that I got for almost free. It has almost no hours on it, but has surface oxidation due to storage in a slightly humid environment. Anyway, that isn't the problem, I can take care of that easily.

      Here are my problems. I have to crank the handles a couple rotations before any the of the axis move. Also, there is a lot of slop in the axis. If I tighten what I think I need to to remove the slop, I can't move the axis... I am apprehensive to tear it down completely as I don't really know the mill. I also need to get all of the shipping grease off.

      I was wondering if there is someone local who could help me (Terryville CT), or someone that could at least walk me through the tear down of this thing.

      Any help is appreciated.

    • Stephen Castello
      On 30 Mar 2014 00:11:05 -0700, had a flock of ... Look here: http://crevicereamer.com/Page_6.html -- Stephen Movie fact: An electric
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 4, 2014
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        On 30 Mar 2014 00:11:05 -0700, <evan.madore@...> had a flock of
        green cheek conures squawk out:

        >I was wondering if you guys could help me. I have a HF Mini mill that I got for almost free. It has almost no hours on it, but has surface oxidation due to storage in a slightly humid environment. Anyway, that isn't the problem, I can take care of that easily.
        > Here are my problems. I have to crank the handles a couple rotations before any the of the axis move. Also, there is a lot of slop in the axis. If I tighten what I think I need to to remove the slop, I can't move the axis... I am apprehensive to tear it down completely as I don't really know the mill. I also need to get all of the shipping grease off.
        > I was wondering if there is someone local who could help me (Terryville CT), or someone that could at least walk me through the tear down of this thing.
        > Any help is appreciated.

        Look here: http://crevicereamer.com/Page_6.html


        --

        Stephen

        Movie fact:
        An electric fence, powerful enough to kill a dinosaur will cause no lasting damage to an eight year old child.
      • markkimball2000
        Check the nuts used to attach the handwheels to the lead screw. One of the common adjustments needed on these machines is to properly tighten them. Too loose
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 6, 2014
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          Check the nuts used to attach the handwheels to the lead screw.  One of the common adjustments needed on these machines is to properly tighten them.  Too loose and you get a lot of backlash.  Too tight and the handwheel becomes very hard to turn.

          You also should download the manual for your mill, it should show lots of details, and will describe basic adjustments to your machine -- including setting the gib screws, handwheel nuts and lubrication.

          Mark
        • superc_53
          Hello Zild. Regretably at some point you will indeed have to tear the mill down because you write it still has shipping grease on it. Sadly they put shipping
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 7, 2014
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            Hello Zild.
            Regretably at some point you will indeed have to tear the mill down because you write it still has shipping grease on it.  Sadly they put shipping grease on the inside parts also.  The grease collects sand, dirt and swarf which has an increasingly degrading effect on mill performance if it isn't all cleaned off.  For cleaning shipping grease off of mill parts, two products come to mind.  Kerosene (some don't like playing with kerosene) or simple WD40.  I put an inch or two into a big washing pan, then one at a time put mill parts in the pan and scrubbed them with a brush until they were clean, then dried them off.
            You didn't specify which Harbor Freight mini mill you have.  Sadly they have offered (and still do) many different types through the years.  I am going to go on the presumption yours is one of the ones made by Sieg and that it is an X2 or SX2 variant.  I therefore strongly suggest going to http://crevicereamer.com/Page_6.html reading it then go to his excellent  pages 7 and 9 to learn how to tear it down and clean the X2 mills.
            If the mills pictured on page 6 are not the kind you have, please let us know the markings or model number of what you have so we can be more helpful in sending guidance.
          • Jwc C
            Often I read posts on these forums about the shipping grease problem .        I too had to remove the reddish stuff from my lathe, mill, drill press and
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 8, 2014
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              Often I read posts on these forums about the shipping grease "problem".
               
                   I too had to remove the reddish stuff from my lathe, mill, drill press and some tools like rotary table, chucks, carbide turning bits etc....I saw it as an opportunity to inspect, adjust and modify.  
                  Yes, it is lot of work to remove, but it's there for a purpose, which it does well.  I guess most machinery shipped and stored for long periods without that protection would be corroded, pitted and/or some parts frozen together, on parts or areas critical to precision.
                  Removing rust and corrosion would surely be much worse,
              Some of the alternatives do not do as well, tools packed with the wax saturated paper often have dark spots and areas of corrosion. 
                 After the first cleaning and set up, the accumulated labor to protect machinery after use, with oil or grease is much more.
               
              JWCC8
              On Monday, April 7, 2014 4:14 PM, "superc_53@..." <superc_53@...> wrote:


              Hello Zild.
              Regretably at some point you will indeed have to tear the mill down because you write it still has shipping grease on it.  Sadly they put shipping grease on the inside parts also.  The grease collects sand, dirt and swarf which has an increasingly degrading effect on mill performance if it isn't all cleaned off.  For cleaning shipping grease off of mill parts, two products come to mind.  Kerosene (some don't like playing with kerosene) or simple WD40.  I put an inch or two into a big washing pan, then one at a time put mill parts in the pan and scrubbed them with a brush until they were clean, then dried them off.
              You didn't specify which Harbor Freight mini mill you have.  Sadly they have offered (and still do) many different types through the years.  I am going to go on the presumption yours is one of the ones made by Sieg and that it is an X2 or SX2 variant.  I therefore strongly suggest going to http://crevicereamer.com/Page_6.html reading it then go to his excellent  pages 7 and 9 to learn how to tear it down and clean the X2 mills.
              If the mills pictured on page 6 are not the kind you have, please let us know the markings or model number of what you have so we can be more helpful in sending guidance.




            • superc_53
              Hmm, I never saw it as a problem. A time eating nuisance perhaps, but not a problem. It serves, as you note, a function. Likewise totally disassembly and re
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 9, 2014
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                Hmm, I never saw it as a problem.  A time eating nuisance perhaps, but not a problem.  It serves, as you note, a function.  Likewise totally disassembly and re assembly of the lathe or mill gives newbies a much better understanding of how it all ties together.  Also shifts the blame for improperly tightened (or forgotten) bolts to the person putting it together again.  Also removes a lot of sand and dirt we don't want in our machines.
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