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Cutting thin brass sheet

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  • markkimball2000
    Since this is regarding the addition of DROs to my SX2 I don t think this is too far OT. I want to use some relatively thin (.015 ) brass sheet to move the
    Message 1 of 16 , Nov 26, 2013
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      Since this is regarding the addition of DROs to my SX2 I don't think this is too far OT.

      I want to use some relatively thin (.015") brass sheet to move the sensor on my Z axis DRO.  The idea is to use the sheet's flex to take care of small height differences along the rule, while keeping good rigidity parallel to the rule.  On one end the sheet would attach to the sender (rule is attached to the column).  The other end would be clamped to the milling head, using a standoff to get both ends of the sheet to the same plane.

      Problem is, I just have metal snips and cutting brass that thin with it results in a curved sheet.  The best solution would be to use a nice metal shear but I don't have one.  What would you guys do in this situation?  Hand-cut & flatten as best as possible?  Mash it in a vise?

      Thanks,

      Mark
    • jandtsc
      Well You have a mill, clamp it between two pieces of iron and make it to size. Best regards, Jan from the Netherlands, ... Since this is regarding the addition
      Message 2 of 16 , Nov 26, 2013
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        Well You have a mill, clamp it between two pieces of iron and make it to size.


        Best regards,


        Jan from the Netherlands, 



        ---In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, <mark.kimball2@...> wrote:

        Since this is regarding the addition of DROs to my SX2 I don't think this is too far OT.

        I want to use some relatively thin (.015") brass sheet to move the sensor on my Z axis DRO.  The idea is to use the sheet's flex to take care of small height differences along the rule, while keeping good rigidity parallel to the rule.  On one end the sheet would attach to the sender (rule is attached to the column).  The other end would be clamped to the milling head, using a standoff to get both ends of the sheet to the same plane.

        Problem is, I just have metal snips and cutting brass that thin with it results in a curved sheet.  The best solution would be to use a nice metal shear but I don't have one.  What would you guys do in this situation?  Hand-cut & flatten as best as possible?  Mash it in a vise?

        Thanks,

        Mark
      • John Lindo
        use a good set of tailors scissors John Spain On Tuesday, November 26, 2013 5:22 PM, mark.kimball2@frontier.com wrote:   ...
        Message 3 of 16 , Nov 26, 2013
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          use a good set of tailors scissors

          John
          Spain


          On Tuesday, November 26, 2013 5:22 PM, "mark.kimball2@..." <mark.kimball2@...> wrote:
           
          Since this is regarding the addition of DROs to my SX2 I don't think this is too far OT.

          I want to use some relatively thin (.015") brass sheet to move the sensor on my Z axis DRO.  The idea is to use the sheet's flex to take care of small height differences along the rule, while keeping good rigidity parallel to the rule.  On one end the sheet would attach to the sender (rule is attached to the column).  The other end would be clamped to the milling head, using a standoff to get both ends of the sheet to the same plane.

          Problem is, I just have metal snips and cutting brass that thin with it results in a curved sheet.  The best solution would be to use a nice metal shear but I don't have one.  What would you guys do in this situation?  Hand-cut & flatten as best as possible?  Mash it in a vise?

          Thanks,

          Mark


        • Chris Wood
          If John’s idea doesn’t work (or your wife slaps your hand), cut it a bit oversize. Then sandwich it between two 1/8” or thicker pieces of aluminum and
          Message 4 of 16 , Nov 26, 2013
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            If John’s idea doesn’t work (or your wife slaps your hand), cut it a bit oversize. Then sandwich it between two 1/8” or thicker pieces of aluminum and mill it to final size.

             

             

            Chris Wood
            LittleMachineShop.com

            The premier source of tooling, parts, and accessories for bench top machinists.
            396 W. Washington Blvd. #500, Pasadena, CA 91103
            (800)981-9663 * Fax (626)797-7934

             

             

             

            From: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of John Lindo
            Sent: Tuesday, November 26, 2013 8:54 AM
            To: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [GrizHFMinimill] Cutting thin brass sheet

             

             

            use a good set of tailors scissors

             

            John

            Spain

             

            On Tuesday, November 26, 2013 5:22 PM, "mark.kimball2@..." <mark.kimball2@...> wrote:

             

            Since this is regarding the addition of DROs to my SX2 I don't think this is too far OT.

            I want to use some relatively thin (.015") brass sheet to move the sensor on my Z axis DRO.  The idea is to use the sheet's flex to take care of small height differences along the rule, while keeping good rigidity parallel to the rule.  On one end the sheet would attach to the sender (rule is attached to the column).  The other end would be clamped to the milling head, using a standoff to get both ends of the sheet to the same plane.

            Problem is, I just have metal snips and cutting brass that thin with it results in a curved sheet.  The best solution would be to use a nice metal shear but I don't have one.  What would you guys do in this situation?  Hand-cut & flatten as best as possible?  Mash it in a vise?

            Thanks,

            Mark

             

          • trainliker
            You can also cut thin sheet metal with a knife such as X-Acto or a box cutter type. It can help to first mount the sheet metal on something supportive, such
            Message 5 of 16 , Nov 26, 2013
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              You can also cut thin sheet metal with a knife such as X-Acto or a box cutter type.  It can help to first mount the sheet metal on something supportive, such as MDF or something strong using some spray adhesive.  Depending on the quality of the edge you want, you may need to file it clean since the "cutting" is more like displacement of the metal.
               
              You drag the knife across, usually more than once, until you have the cut.  Since folks tend to use a lot more force since it is metal, exercise extra caution regarding the knife slipping, blade breaking, or other surprise.
               
              You can also try using a regular shearing type paper cutter, but will still probable get a little curvature.
               
              You can also make the cut using something like a cutoff wheel in a Dremel type rotary tool, but will also need to clean up a somewhat imperfect edge when done.  I have seen people cut sheet brass for scratch built brass model railroad engines like this.
               
              Chuck K.
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Tuesday, November 26, 2013 9:11 AM
              Subject: RE: [GrizHFMinimill] Cutting thin brass sheet

               

              If John’s idea doesn’t work (or your wife slaps your hand), cut it a bit oversize. Then sandwich it between two 1/8” or thicker pieces of aluminum and mill it to final size.

              Chris Wood
              LittleMachineShop.com

              The premier source of tooling, parts, and accessories for bench top machinists.
              396 W. Washington Blvd. #500, Pasadena, CA 91103
              (800)981-9663 * Fax (626)797-7934

              From: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of John Lindo
              Sent: Tuesday, November 26, 2013 8:54 AM
              To: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [GrizHFMinimill] Cutting thin brass sheet

               

              use a good set of tailors scissors

              John

              Spain

              On Tuesday, November 26, 2013 5:22 PM, "mark.kimball2@..." <mark.kimball2@...> wrote:

               

              Since this is regarding the addition of DROs to my SX2 I don't think this is too far OT.

              I want to use some relatively thin (.015") brass sheet to move the sensor on my Z axis DRO.  The idea is to use the sheet's flex to take care of small height differences along the rule, while keeping good rigidity parallel to the rule.  On one end the sheet would attach to the sender (rule is attached to the column).  The other end would be clamped to the milling head, using a standoff to get both ends of the sheet to the same plane.

              Problem is, I just have metal snips and cutting brass that thin with it results in a curved sheet.  The best solution would be to use a nice metal shear but I don't have one.  What would you guys do in this situation?  Hand-cut & flatten as best as possible?  Mash it in a vise?

              Thanks,

              Mark

            • garretto
              A tool like this : http://www.adelnibbler.com/ http://www.adelnibbler.com/ doesn t deform the metal (although it does leave a slightly ragged edge). If you
              Message 6 of 16 , Nov 26, 2013
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                A tool like this :


                 http://www.adelnibbler.com/


                doesn't deform the metal (although it does leave a slightly ragged edge).


                If you have an air compressor, there are air powered versions. I bought mine at Harbor Freight.



                ---In grizhfminimill@yahoogroups.com, <ckinzer@...> wrote:

                
                You can also cut thin sheet metal with a knife such as X-Acto or a box cutter type.  It can help to first mount the sheet metal on something supportive, such as MDF or something strong using some spray adhesive.  Depending on the quality of the edge you want, you may need to file it clean since the "cutting" is more like displacement of the metal.
                 
                You drag the knife across, usually more than once, until you have the cut.  Since folks tend to use a lot more force since it is metal, exercise extra caution regarding the knife slipping, blade breaking, or other surprise.
                 
                You can also try using a regular shearing type paper cutter, but will still probable get a little curvature.
                 
                You can also make the cut using something like a cutoff wheel in a Dremel type rotary tool, but will also need to clean up a somewhat imperfect edge when done.  I have seen people cut sheet brass for scratch built brass model railroad engines like this.
                 
                Chuck K.
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Tuesday, November 26, 2013 9:11 AM
                Subject: RE: [GrizHFMinimill] Cutting thin brass sheet

                 

                If John’s idea doesn’t work (or your wife slaps your hand), cut it a bit oversize. Then sandwich it between two 1/8” or thicker pieces of aluminum and mill it to final size.

                Chris Wood
                LittleMachineShop.com

                The premier source of tooling, parts, and accessories for bench top machinists.
                396 W. Washington Blvd. #500, Pasadena, CA 91103
                (800)981-9663 * Fax (626)797-7934

                From: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of John Lindo
                Sent: Tuesday, November 26, 2013 8:54 AM
                To: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [GrizHFMinimill] Cutting thin brass sheet

                 

                use a good set of tailors scissors

                John

                Spain

                On Tuesday, November 26, 2013 5:22 PM, "mark.kimball2@..." <mark.kimball2@...> wrote:

                 

                Since this is regarding the addition of DROs to my SX2 I don't think this is too far OT.

                I want to use some relatively thin (.015") brass sheet to move the sensor on my Z axis DRO.  The idea is to use the sheet's flex to take care of small height differences along the rule, while keeping good rigidity parallel to the rule.  On one end the sheet would attach to the sender (rule is attached to the column).  The other end would be clamped to the milling head, using a standoff to get both ends of the sheet to the same plane.

                Problem is, I just have metal snips and cutting brass that thin with it results in a curved sheet.  The best solution would be to use a nice metal shear but I don't have one.  What would you guys do in this situation?  Hand-cut & flatten as best as possible?  Mash it in a vise?

                Thanks,

                Mark

              • John Lindo
                Chris. Maybe it s just me,but cutting brass shim stock up to 0.02 seems to hone the scissors edges and keeps them sharp, also cutting 300 grit paper from both
                Message 7 of 16 , Nov 26, 2013
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                  Chris.
                  Maybe it's just me,but cutting brass shim stock up to 0.02" seems to hone the scissors edges and keeps them sharp,
                  also cutting 300 grit paper from both sides is a good sharpening aid.
                  cutting paper quickly dulls scissors,
                  Also a touch of WD 40 seems to help during cutting.
                  PS I do not make my own dresses anymore.

                  John
                  Spain.


                  On Tuesday, November 26, 2013 6:28 PM, "ckinzer@..." <ckinzer@...> wrote:
                   
                  
                  You can also cut thin sheet metal with a knife such as X-Acto or a box cutter type.  It can help to first mount the sheet metal on something supportive, such as MDF or something strong using some spray adhesive.  Depending on the quality of the edge you want, you may need to file it clean since the "cutting" is more like displacement of the metal.
                   
                  You drag the knife across, usually more than once, until you have the cut.  Since folks tend to use a lot more force since it is metal, exercise extra caution regarding the knife slipping, blade breaking, or other surprise.
                   
                  You can also try using a regular shearing type paper cutter, but will still probable get a little curvature.
                   
                  You can also make the cut using something like a cutoff wheel in a Dremel type rotary tool, but will also need to clean up a somewhat imperfect edge when done.  I have seen people cut sheet brass for scratch built brass model railroad engines like this.
                   
                  Chuck K.
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Tuesday, November 26, 2013 9:11 AM
                  Subject: RE: [GrizHFMinimill] Cutting thin brass sheet

                   
                  If John’s idea doesn’t work (or your wife slaps your hand), cut it a bit oversize. Then sandwich it between two 1/8” or thicker pieces of aluminum and mill it to final size.
                  Chris Wood
                  LittleMachineShop.com

                  The premier source of tooling, parts, and accessories for bench top machinists.
                  396 W. Washington Blvd. #500, Pasadena, CA 91103
                  (800)981-9663 * Fax (626)797-7934
                  From: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com [mailto:GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of John Lindo
                  Sent: Tuesday, November 26, 2013 8:54 AM
                  To: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [GrizHFMinimill] Cutting thin brass sheet
                   
                  use a good set of tailors scissors
                  John
                  Spain
                  On Tuesday, November 26, 2013 5:22 PM, "mark.kimball2@..." <mark.kimball2@...> wrote:
                   
                  Since this is regarding the addition of DROs to my SX2 I don't think this is too far OT.

                  I want to use some relatively thin (.015") brass sheet to move the sensor on my Z axis DRO.  The idea is to use the sheet's flex to take care of small height differences along the rule, while keeping good rigidity parallel to the rule.  On one end the sheet would attach to the sender (rule is attached to the column).  The other end would be clamped to the milling head, using a standoff to get both ends of the sheet to the same plane.

                  Problem is, I just have metal snips and cutting brass that thin with it results in a curved sheet.  The best solution would be to use a nice metal shear but I don't have one.  What would you guys do in this situation?  Hand-cut & flatten as best as possible?  Mash it in a vise?

                  Thanks,

                  Mark


                • Jim E.
                  Sandwich it between to thin pieces of wood (or anything else semi-firm) and cut with either with your tinsnips or a 32tpi hacksaw. Graciously, Jim E. Lakewood,
                  Message 8 of 16 , Nov 26, 2013
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                    Sandwich it between to thin pieces of wood (or anything else semi-firm)
                    and cut with either with your tinsnips or a 32tpi hacksaw.

                    Graciously,
                    Jim E.
                    Lakewood, Calif.
                    All Hail Rube Goldberg!


                    mark.kimball2@... wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > Since this is regarding the addition of DROs to my SX2 I don't think
                    > this is too far OT.
                    >
                    > I want to use some relatively thin (.015") brass sheet to move the
                    > sensor on my Z axis DRO. The idea is to use the sheet's flex to take
                    > care of small height differences along the rule, while keeping good
                    > rigidity parallel to the rule. On one end the sheet would attach to the
                    > sender (rule is attached to the column). The other end would be clamped
                    > to the milling head, using a standoff to get both ends of the sheet to
                    > the same plane.
                    >
                    > Problem is, I just have metal snips and cutting brass that thin with it
                    > results in a curved sheet. The best solution would be to use a nice
                    > metal shear but I don't have one. What would you guys do in this
                    > situation? Hand-cut & flatten as best as possible? Mash it in a vise?
                    >
                    > Thanks,
                    >
                    > Mark
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > No virus found in this message.
                    > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com <http://www.avg.com>
                    > Version: 2013.0.3426 / Virus Database: 3629/6868 - Release Date: 11/26/13
                    >
                  • Garrett OBrien
                    Use a hand nibbler http://www.adelnibbler.com/ or a air powered one if you have a compressor.
                    Message 9 of 16 , Nov 26, 2013
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                      Use a hand nibbler


                      or a air powered one if you have a compressor.
                    • Malcolm Parker-Lisberg
                      You get cramp and blood blisters using them If you mix metals that you use them on they quickly burr over the edge. Malcolm I don t suffer from insanity I
                      Message 10 of 16 , Nov 26, 2013
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                        You get cramp and blood blisters using them If you mix metals that you use them on they quickly burr over the edge.

                        Malcolm

                        I don't suffer from insanity I enjoy it!
                        Mene, mene, tekel, upharsin
                        The writing is on the wall.
                        Ha-ktovet al ha-kir

                        --------------------------------------------
                        On Tue, 11/26/13, garrett.obrien1@... <garrett.obrien1@...> wrote:

                        Subject: [GrizHFMinimill] RE: Cutting thin brass sheet
                        To: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Tuesday, November 26, 2013, 5:38 PM
















                         









                        A tool like this :
                         http://www.adelnibbler.com/
                        doesn't
                        deform the metal (although it does leave a slightly ragged
                        edge).
                        If
                        you have an air compressor, there are air powered versions.
                        I bought mine at Harbor Freight.

                        ---In grizhfminimill@yahoogroups.com, <ckinzer@...>
                        wrote:

                        




                        You can also cut thin sheet
                        metal with a knife such
                        as X-Acto or a box cutter type.  It can help to first
                        mount the sheet metal
                        on something supportive, such as MDF or something strong
                        using some spray
                        adhesive.  Depending on the quality of the edge you
                        want, you may need to
                        file it clean since the "cutting" is more like
                        displacement of the
                        metal.
                         
                        You drag the knife across,
                        usually more than once,
                        until you have the cut.  Since folks tend to use a lot
                        more force since it
                        is metal, exercise extra caution regarding the knife
                        slipping, blade breaking,
                        or other surprise.
                         
                        You can also try using a
                        regular shearing type
                        paper cutter, but will still probable get a little
                        curvature.
                         
                        You can also make the cut
                        using something like a
                        cutoff wheel in a Dremel type rotary tool, but will also
                        need to clean up a
                        somewhat imperfect edge when done.  I have seen people
                        cut sheet brass for
                        scratch built brass model railroad engines like
                        this.
                         
                        Chuck K.
                         

                        ----- Original Message -----

                        From:
                        Chris Wood
                        To: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com


                        Sent: Tuesday,
                        November 26, 2013 9:11
                        AM
                        Subject: RE:
                        [GrizHFMinimill] Cutting
                        thin brass sheet

                         



                        If John’s
                        idea doesn’t work (or your wife slaps your hand), cut it
                        a bit oversize. Then
                        sandwich it between two 1/8” or thicker pieces of
                        aluminum and mill it to
                        final size.


                        Chris
                        Wood
                        LittleMachineShop.com
                        The premier
                        source of tooling, parts, and
                        accessories for bench top machinists.
                        396 W.
                        Washington Blvd. #500, Pasadena,
                        CA 91103

                        (800)981-9663 * Fax
                        (626)797-7934





                        From: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
                        [mailto:GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                        John
                        Lindo
                        Sent: Tuesday, November 26, 2013 8:54 AM
                        To:
                        GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: Re: [GrizHFMinimill] Cutting
                        thin brass sheet

                         






                        use a good set of
                        tailors
                        scissors



                        John

                        Spain





                        On Tuesday, November 26,
                        2013 5:22 PM,
                        "mark.kimball2@..."

                        <mark.kimball2@...>

                        wrote:




                         




                        Since this is regarding the addition of
                        DROs to my SX2
                        I don't think this is too far OT.

                        I want to use some relatively thin
                        (.015") brass sheet to move the sensor on my Z axis
                        DRO.  The idea is
                        to use the sheet's flex to take care of small height
                        differences along the
                        rule, while keeping good rigidity parallel to the
                        rule.  On one end the
                        sheet would attach to the sender (rule is attached to
                        the column).  The
                        other end would be clamped to the milling head, using a
                        standoff to get both
                        ends of the sheet to the same plane.

                        Problem is, I just have metal
                        snips and cutting brass that thin with it results in a
                        curved sheet. 
                        The best solution would be to use a nice metal shear but
                        I don't have
                        one.  What would you guys do in this
                        situation?  Hand-cut &
                        flatten as best as possible?  Mash it in a
                        vise?

                        Thanks,

                        Mark
                      • markkimball2000
                        .015 brass is pretty thin. I d thought about something like the clamps + mill idea but feared it would tear rather than cut, unless I milled a bit of the
                        Message 11 of 16 , Nov 26, 2013
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                          .015" brass is pretty thin.  I'd thought about something like the clamps + mill idea but feared it would tear rather than cut, unless I milled a bit of the clamps too.  That turns it into something similar to the wood idea, where the wood sheets are sacrificed during the operation. 


                          OTOH since I don't need many brass strips either approach would work for this project.


                          I looked at a 6" plate shear that Grizzly sells for about $70 but for my particular requirements right now it's overkill as far as thickness capacity goes, and a bit limited in the size of stock it can cut.  On the other hand a metal nibbler could be handy for all sorts of sheet metal projects.... 




                          Mark




                          ---In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, <jan.kersten.dtsc@...> wrote:

                          Well You have a mill, clamp it between two pieces of iron and make it to size.


                          Best regards,


                          Jan from the Netherlands, 



                          ---In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, <mark.kimball2@...> wrote:

                          Since this is regarding the addition of DROs to my SX2 I don't think this is too far OT.

                          I want to use some relatively thin (.015") brass sheet to move the sensor on my Z axis DRO.  The idea is to use the sheet's flex to take care of small height differences along the rule, while keeping good rigidity parallel to the rule.  On one end the sheet would attach to the sender (rule is attached to the column).  The other end would be clamped to the milling head, using a standoff to get both ends of the sheet to the same plane.

                          Problem is, I just have metal snips and cutting brass that thin with it results in a curved sheet.  The best solution would be to use a nice metal shear but I don't have one.  What would you guys do in this situation?  Hand-cut & flatten as best as possible?  Mash it in a vise?

                          Thanks,

                          Mark
                        • drmico60
                          As others have suggested nibblers work well and leave undistorted edges. The only problem with nibblers is they are not easy to control. This is especially
                          Message 12 of 16 , Nov 27, 2013
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                            As others have suggested nibblers work well and leave undistorted edges. The only problem with nibblers is they are not easy to control. This is especially true of the cheap attachments for portable electric drills. These cut well but because the head is not rigidly clamped to the drill body there is too much flexibility. This can be solved by making a collar to connect the drill and nibbler together, see: 

                            http://mikesworkshop.weebly.com/nibbler.html

                            Even better control can be had by mounting the nibbler to a purpose built table, see:

                            http://mikesworkshop.weebly.com/a-nibbler-table.html

                            Mike





                            ---In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, <mark.kimball2@...> wrote:

                            Since this is regarding the addition of DROs to my SX2 I don't think this is too far OT.

                            I want to use some relatively thin (.015") brass sheet to move the sensor on my Z axis DRO.  The idea is to use the sheet's flex to take care of small height differences along the rule, while keeping good rigidity parallel to the rule.  On one end the sheet would attach to the sender (rule is attached to the column).  The other end would be clamped to the milling head, using a standoff to get both ends of the sheet to the same plane.

                            Problem is, I just have metal snips and cutting brass that thin with it results in a curved sheet.  The best solution would be to use a nice metal shear but I don't have one.  What would you guys do in this situation?  Hand-cut & flatten as best as possible?  Mash it in a vise?

                            Thanks,

                            Mark
                          • a rien
                            I used the Brass Link on all three of my dro s..I think that .015 is too thin for a reliable readings through the range, I used .030 . As a retired sheet
                            Message 13 of 16 , Nov 27, 2013
                            • 0 Attachment
                              I used the "Brass Link" on all three of my dro's..I think that .015" is too thin for a reliable readings through the range, I used .030". As a retired sheet metal worker, I made all of my cuts with snips. Cut the pc oversize and trim it with the waste on the side of the snip that curls the waste up.
                              The other option, as mentioned, score your cuts a few times with a utility knife or sharp scribe and just fracture it.
                              Anthony
                              --------------------------------------------
                              On Wed, 11/27/13, mikey.cox@... <mikey.cox@...> wrote:

                              Subject: [GrizHFMinimill] RE: Cutting thin brass sheet
                              To: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
                              Date: Wednesday, November 27, 2013, 4:43 AM






























                              As others have suggested nibblers work well and leave
                              undistorted edges. The only problem with nibblers is they
                              are not easy to control.
                              This is especially true of the cheap attachments for
                              portable electric drills. These cut well but because the
                              head is not rigidly clamped to the drill body there is too
                              much flexibility. This can be solved by making a collar to
                              connect the drill and nibbler together,
                              see: http://mikesworkshop.weebly.com/nibbler.html
                              Even
                              better control can be had by mounting the nibbler to a
                              purpose built table, see:http://mikesworkshop.weebly.com/a-nibbler-table.htmlMike



                              ---In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com,
                              <mark.kimball2@...> wrote:

                              Since this is
                              regarding the addition of DROs to my SX2 I don't think
                              this is too far OT.

                              I want to use some relatively thin (.015") brass sheet
                              to move the sensor on my Z axis DRO.  The idea is to
                              use the sheet's flex to take care of small height
                              differences along the rule, while keeping good rigidity
                              parallel to the rule.  On one end the sheet would
                              attach to the sender (rule is attached to the column). 
                              The other end would be clamped to the milling head, using a
                              standoff to get both ends of the sheet to the same plane.

                              Problem is, I just have metal snips and cutting brass that
                              thin with it results in a curved sheet.  The best
                              solution would be to use a nice metal shear but I don't
                              have one.  What would you guys do in this
                              situation?  Hand-cut & flatten as best as
                              possible?  Mash it in a vise?

                              Thanks,

                              Mark
                            • Barry Young
                              Hi Mark: If it is about amateur machining it is not off topic.  Barry Young Group Owner On Wednesday, November 27, 2013 7:57 AM, a rien
                              Message 14 of 16 , Nov 27, 2013
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Hi Mark:

                                If it is about amateur machining it is not off topic. 

                                Barry Young
                                Group Owner



                                On Wednesday, November 27, 2013 7:57 AM, a rien <amriensr@...> wrote:
                                I used the "Brass Link" on all three of my dro's..I think that .015" is too thin for a reliable readings through the range, I used .030". As a retired sheet metal worker, I made all of my cuts with snips. Cut the pc oversize and trim it with the waste on the side of the snip that curls the waste up.
                                The other option, as mentioned, score your cuts a few times with a utility knife or sharp scribe and just fracture it.
                                Anthony
                                --------------------------------------------
                                On Wed, 11/27/13, mikey.cox@... <mikey.cox@...> wrote:

                                Subject: [GrizHFMinimill] RE: Cutting thin brass sheet
                                To: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Wednesday, November 27, 2013, 4:43 AM










                                       



















                                As others have suggested nibblers work well and leave
                                undistorted edges. The only problem with nibblers is they
                                are not easy to control.
                                This is especially true of the cheap attachments for
                                portable electric drills. These cut well but because the
                                head is not rigidly clamped to the drill body there is too
                                much flexibility. This can be solved by making a collar to
                                connect the drill and nibbler together,
                                see: http://mikesworkshop.weebly.com/nibbler.html
                                Even
                                better control can be had by mounting the nibbler to a
                                purpose built table, see:http://mikesworkshop.weebly.com/a-nibbler-table.htmlMike

                                 

                                ---In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com,
                                <mark.kimball2@...> wrote:

                                Since this is
                                regarding the addition of DROs to my SX2 I don't think
                                this is too far OT.

                                I want to use some relatively thin (.015") brass sheet
                                to move the sensor on my Z axis DRO.  The idea is to
                                use the sheet's flex to take care of small height
                                differences along the rule, while keeping good rigidity
                                parallel to the rule.  On one end the sheet would
                                attach to the sender (rule is attached to the column). 
                                The other end would be clamped to the milling head, using a
                                standoff to get both ends of the sheet to the same plane.

                                Problem is, I just have metal snips and cutting brass that
                                thin with it results in a curved sheet.  The best
                                solution would be to use a nice metal shear but I don't
                                have one.  What would you guys do in this
                                situation?  Hand-cut & flatten as best as
                                possible?  Mash it in a vise?

                                Thanks,

                                Mark






















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                              • markkimball2000
                                Thanks for the info & feedback. I like your use of the term link because it s more descriptive regarding the application. Since I ve got it I ll try the
                                Message 15 of 16 , Nov 27, 2013
                                • 0 Attachment

                                  Thanks for the info & feedback.  I like your use of the term "link" because it's more descriptive regarding the application.


                                  Since I've got it I'll try the .015" on the Z & see how it works.  I was trying to balance rigidity on one axis vs some decent flex on the other. 


                                  Current plan is to cut a link  & punch the holes for attaching it to the sender (I do have access to a good hole punch).  The other end will be held in place by a clamp (so I won't need to worry about accurate hole placement on that end).   I won't have a lot into it if it isn't rigid enough.


                                  I don't think making the link substantially wider than the sender mounting holes will buy me much so if it isn't rigid enough it means another trip down to the hardware store.  I should know soon enough!


                                  Mark



                                  ---In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, <amriensr@...> wrote:

                                  I used the "Brass Link" on all three of my dro's..I think that .015" is too thin for a reliable readings through the range, I used .030". As a retired sheet metal worker, I made all of my cuts with snips. Cut the pc oversize and trim it with the waste on the side of the snip that curls the waste up.
                                  The other option, as mentioned, score your cuts a few times with a utility knife or sharp scribe and just fracture it.
                                  Anthony
                                  --------------------------------------------
                                  On Wed, 11/27/13, mikey.cox@... <mikey.cox@...> wrote:

                                  Subject: [GrizHFMinimill] RE: Cutting thin brass sheet
                                  To: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
                                  Date: Wednesday, November 27, 2013, 4:43 AM






























                                  As others have suggested nibblers work well and leave
                                  undistorted edges. The only problem with nibblers is they
                                  are not easy to control.
                                  This is especially true of the cheap attachments for
                                  portable electric drills. These cut well but because the
                                  head is not rigidly clamped to the drill body there is too
                                  much flexibility. This can be solved by making a collar to
                                  connect the drill and nibbler together,
                                  see: http://mikesworkshop.weebly.com/nibbler.html
                                  Even
                                  better control can be had by mounting the nibbler to a
                                  purpose built table, see:http://mikesworkshop.weebly.com/a-nibbler-table.htmlMike



                                  ---In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com,
                                  <mark.kimball2@...> wrote:

                                  Since this is
                                  regarding the addition of DROs to my SX2 I don't think
                                  this is too far OT.

                                  I want to use some relatively thin (.015") brass sheet
                                  to move the sensor on my Z axis DRO.  The idea is to
                                  use the sheet's flex to take care of small height
                                  differences along the rule, while keeping good rigidity
                                  parallel to the rule.  On one end the sheet would
                                  attach to the sender (rule is attached to the column). 
                                  The other end would be clamped to the milling head, using a
                                  standoff to get both ends of the sheet to the same plane.

                                  Problem is, I just have metal snips and cutting brass that
                                  thin with it results in a curved sheet.  The best
                                  solution would be to use a nice metal shear but I don't
                                  have one.  What would you guys do in this
                                  situation?  Hand-cut & flatten as best as
                                  possible?  Mash it in a vise?

                                  Thanks,

                                  Mark
                                • aldridgetony97
                                  Long time since I posted here (house abuilding leaves me little time) a tip for using an elec nibbler, I use mine to cut expanded metal mesh, and bits of the
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Dec 2, 2013
                                  • 0 Attachment

                                    Long time since I posted here (house abuilding leaves me little time) a tip for using an elec nibbler, I use mine to cut expanded metal mesh, and bits of the mesh get trapped between the nibbler and the guides, a small pair of vise grips across the guides with just a little pressure will close the gap and stop metal getting caught.

                                    Tony. 



                                    ---In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, <mark.kimball2@...> wrote:

                                    Thanks for the info & feedback.  I like your use of the term "link" because it's more descriptive regarding the application.


                                    Since I've got it I'll try the .015" on the Z & see how it works.  I was trying to balance rigidity on one axis vs some decent flex on the other. 


                                    Current plan is to cut a link  & punch the holes for attaching it to the sender (I do have access to a good hole punch).  The other end will be held in place by a clamp (so I won't need to worry about accurate hole placement on that end).   I won't have a lot into it if it isn't rigid enough.


                                    I don't think making the link substantially wider than the sender mounting holes will buy me much so if it isn't rigid enough it means another trip down to the hardware store.  I should know soon enough!


                                    Mark



                                    ---In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, <amriensr@...> wrote:

                                    I used the "Brass Link" on all three of my dro's..I think that .015" is too thin for a reliable readings through the range, I used .030". As a retired sheet metal worker, I made all of my cuts with snips. Cut the pc oversize and trim it with the waste on the side of the snip that curls the waste up.
                                    The other option, as mentioned, score your cuts a few times with a utility knife or sharp scribe and just fracture it.
                                    Anthony
                                    --------------------------------------------
                                    On Wed, 11/27/13, mikey.cox@... <mikey.cox@...> wrote:

                                    Subject: [GrizHFMinimill] RE: Cutting thin brass sheet
                                    To: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
                                    Date: Wednesday, November 27, 2013, 4:43 AM






























                                    As others have suggested nibblers work well and leave
                                    undistorted edges. The only problem with nibblers is they
                                    are not easy to control.
                                    This is especially true of the cheap attachments for
                                    portable electric drills. These cut well but because the
                                    head is not rigidly clamped to the drill body there is too
                                    much flexibility. This can be solved by making a collar to
                                    connect the drill and nibbler together,
                                    see: http://mikesworkshop.weebly.com/nibbler.html
                                    Even
                                    better control can be had by mounting the nibbler to a
                                    purpose built table, see:http://mikesworkshop.weebly.com/a-nibbler-table.htmlMike



                                    ---In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com,
                                    <mark.kimball2@...> wrote:

                                    Since this is
                                    regarding the addition of DROs to my SX2 I don't think
                                    this is too far OT.

                                    I want to use some relatively thin (.015") brass sheet
                                    to move the sensor on my Z axis DRO.  The idea is to
                                    use the sheet's flex to take care of small height
                                    differences along the rule, while keeping good rigidity
                                    parallel to the rule.  On one end the sheet would
                                    attach to the sender (rule is attached to the column). 
                                    The other end would be clamped to the milling head, using a
                                    standoff to get both ends of the sheet to the same plane.

                                    Problem is, I just have metal snips and cutting brass that
                                    thin with it results in a curved sheet.  The best
                                    solution would be to use a nice metal shear but I don't
                                    have one.  What would you guys do in this
                                    situation?  Hand-cut & flatten as best as
                                    possible?  Mash it in a vise?

                                    Thanks,

                                    Mark
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