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Re: Reptile heaters to fight condensation

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  • fixit
    The plus side of using a light bulb is you can see if it s turned on & it s really cheap. fixit32068
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 5, 2013
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      The plus side of using a light bulb is you can see if it's turned on & it's really cheap.

      fixit32068





      --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, <ckinzer@...> wrote:
      >
      > There have been discussions on this list (I think) of using light bulbs or other heaters with machines to help prevent condensation.
      >
      > I saw a reference to "reptile heaters" somebody used to keep a water tank from freezing in a motorhome.
      >
      > It seems these are very available, reasonable cost, and don't waste any energy giving off light.
      >
      > Here are a bunch at Amazon.
      >
      > http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=reptile+heaters&tag=mh0b-20&index=aps&hvadid=1470758544&ref=pd_sl_94177f5tql_e
      >
      > The one called "Zoo Med ReptiCare Ceramic Infrared Heat Emitter 100 Watts" is the specific one the guy used in the motorhome and screws into a light bulb socket. Some are corded.
      >
      > There are also thermostats available to keep your "reptile" in a comfortable environment.
      >
      > In fact, the corded "Tetra Aquatic Reptile Heater, 100 Watt" has a built in thermostat.
      >
      > I'm assuming that no mention of voltage means 110-120 VAC. There are some noted as 220-240 VAC also. And lots of wattage choices.
      >
      > Chuck K.
      >
    • Scott Dunt
      THANK YOU. for that post.. Others might not be aware of it, but Rechargeable batteries ala Nicads, do NOT like to be frozen. Because over time they self
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 5, 2013
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        THANK YOU. for that post..

        Others might not be aware of it, but Rechargeable batteries ala Nicads,
        do NOT like to be frozen. Because over time they 'self discharge' it is
        always possible for a battery pack to be discharged when the
        temperatures drop..

        As a Carpenter I have lost way too many batteries due to this.. My work
        shop is un heated unless I am out there working, so all of my cordless
        tool batteries are subject to possible freezing.

        I got an upper kitchen cabinet off the curb and turned it into my "warm
        cabinet" that's were all of my batteries and chargers live, along with
        glue, etc. (which actually is rather convenient in its own right.) Up
        to this point I heated that cabinet with an 'infrared' light bulb. But
        these heaters make more sense to me.. No dangers of melted plastic.

        I found this temperature 'cube' at the big box home improvement store:
        http://www.menards.com/main/heating-cooling/thermostats-freeze-alarms/thermostats/cadet-plug-in-120-volt-freeze-protection-in-line-limiting-thermostat/p-134238-c-6334.htm

        And it handles turning the heater on at 35 degrees and turns it off at
        45 degrees. So I can feel fairly confident that my 'warm cabinet' will
        stay that way in the winter.

        Thanks again for the extra tip..

        --
        Scott Dunt
      • SirJohnOfYork
        The main advantage of the reptile warmers (and similar heaters) will probably become more apparent as more people around the world can no longer buy standard
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 5, 2013
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           The main advantage of the "reptile warmers" (and similar heaters) will probably become more apparent as more people around the world can no longer buy standard old incandescent light bulbs. Governments all around the world are regulating them out of existence. Goodbye, Thoma Edison.
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phase-out_of_incandescent_light_bulbs

           When I leave my nice cool dry basement and go up and outside into the 90F+ heat and high humidity of July, my eye glasses fog up. Hot moist air contracts when it hits my relatively cool eyeglasses and drops it's moisture right there. Condensation. If I worked in a shed or garage and ran an air conditioner out there to keep it moderately livable, like at least down in the low 80's and dry, then opening up the shed or garage doors and letting all the hot moist air rush in would cause major condensation on everything cool, like all my steel tools, the iron lathe bed and milling machine table and etc. If I hadn't moved my little bench top machines to a dehumidified basement workshop room they'd probably be all brown / rust stained by now.

          On 7/5/2013 7:45 AM, fixit wrote:
           

          The plus side of using a light bulb is you can see if it's turned on & it's really cheap.

          fixit32068

          --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, <ckinzer@...> wrote:
          >
          > There have been discussions on this list (I think) of using light bulbs or other heaters with machines to help prevent condensation.
          >
          > I saw a reference to "reptile heaters" somebody used to keep a water tank from freezing in a motorhome.
          >
          > It seems these are very available, reasonable cost, and don't waste any energy giving off light.
          >
          > Here are a bunch at Amazon.
          >
          > http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=reptile+heaters&tag=mh0b-20&index=aps&hvadid=1470758544&ref=pd_sl_94177f5tql_e
          >
          > The one called "Zoo Med ReptiCare Ceramic Infrared Heat Emitter 100 Watts" is the specific one the guy used in the motorhome and screws into a light bulb socket. Some are corded.
          >
          > There are also thermostats available to keep your "reptile" in a comfortable environment.
          >
          > In fact, the corded "Tetra Aquatic Reptile Heater, 100 Watt" has a built in thermostat.
          >
          > I'm assuming that no mention of voltage means 110-120 VAC. There are some noted as 220-240 VAC also. And lots of wattage choices.
          >
          > Chuck K.
          >


        • Tony Smith
          Incandescent bulb suck. Always did, always will. Good riddance. And you meant goddbye Sir Joseph Wilson Swan The main advantage of the reptile warmers
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 6, 2013
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            Incandescent bulb suck.  Always did, always will.  Good riddance.  And you meant “goddbye Sir Joseph Wilson Swan

             

             


             The main advantage of the "reptile warmers" (and similar heaters) will probably become more apparent as more people around the world can no longer buy standard old incandescent light bulbs. Governments all around the world are regulating them out of existence. Goodbye, Thoma Edison.
            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phase-out_of_incandescent_light_bulbs


             

          • SirJohnOfYork
            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Joseph_Wilson_Swan http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Edison In any case, reading old books & articles about using a light
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 6, 2013
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              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Joseph_Wilson_Swan
              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Edison

               In any case, reading old books & articles about using a light bulb AS A HEAT SOURCE isn't going to work very well with the newer efficient lights which don't waste so much energy in the form of heat. In the U.S. there was even a kid's "Easy Bake" play oven that used a 100 watt bulb to bake little cakes and such. They won't work with the new LED or CFL or whatever cool light bulbs either. End of an era, along with old timer advice about covering the old lathe out in the barn with a blanket with a light bulb under there, to keep it at or above the temperature of the surrounding air, and so avoid condensation.

               Didn't mean to step on any international toes.

              On 7/6/2013 3:19 AM, Tony Smith wrote:
               

              Incandescent bulb suck.  Always did, always will.  Good riddance.  And you meant “goddbye Sir Joseph Wilson Swan

               

               


               The main advantage of the "reptile warmers" (and similar heaters) will probably become more apparent as more people around the world can no longer buy standard old incandescent light bulbs. Governments all around the world are regulating them out of existence. Goodbye, Thoma Edison.
              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phase-out_of_incandescent_light_bulbs


               

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