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Re: [GrizHFMinimill] What type of wire to use??

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  • Barry Young
    Hello Robert: I used 12ga stranded copper. This allowed me to crimp then solder terminals onto the wires. Barry Young
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 4, 2008
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      Hello Robert:

      I used 12ga stranded copper. This allowed me to crimp then solder terminals onto the wires.

      Barry Young




      --- On Mon, 8/4/08, learnin_lathe <learnin_lathe@...> wrote:

      > From: learnin_lathe <learnin_lathe@...>
      > Subject: [GrizHFMinimill] What type of wire to use??
      > To: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Monday, August 4, 2008, 12:21 PM
      > For those who have already done a CNC conversion, what type
      > of wire
      > did you use to wire everything up? I was considering using
      > cat5
      > network cable,but I'm not sure if it can handle the
      > load. Any
      > suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
      >
      > Robert
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
    • learnin_lathe
      thanks for the help guys! Now I know not to use cat5!
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 6, 2008
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        thanks for the help guys! Now I know not to use cat5!
      • Danny Stone
        This is not entirely correct. The Power Over Ethernet standard (PoE, IEEE 802.3ae/at) provide for around 30W power across 2 pairs * 48V nominal up to 300
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 8, 2008
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          This is not entirely correct. The Power Over Ethernet standard (PoE,
          IEEE 802.3ae/at) provide for around 30W power across 2 pairs * 48V
          nominal up to 300 meters. It is also plenum and be routed through
          walls. (For more info, Google PoE). So Ethernet cable (CAT 5, 5E, 6)
          can be - and is - used to carry DC power along with data. The
          implementation is similar to the (very) old method of digital trunk
          powering used in telephony.

          Nevertheless, this does not mean that CAT5 is suitable for your
          application.

          When choosing a suitable wire/cable, at least the following has to be
          considered:
          - Current/voltage/power requrements of the load
          - Temperature
          - Flexing (standed wire handles flexing better than solid)
          - Number of conductors
          - Insulation and armor (resistance to chips, coolants, cutting fluids)
          - Shielding (for EMI/noise)

          So the choice of cable depends on what you're connecting, the
          electrical, mechanical, and physical requirements. Which vary widely
          among the CNC setups.

          Another related item requiring attention that is often neglected is
          the choice of connectors. The points listed above also apply to the
          chioce of connectors as well. Back to your original question, modular
          RJ connectors, such as the RJ-45 used for Ethernet, are *horrible*
          connectors for a machining environment.

          Safety is the first consideration, and reliability should not be
          overlooked. Cable cost is not really a major consideration, since
          your run lengths are likely relatively short. Good connectors are not
          cheap, though.

          Take a look at your setup, and learning the answers to the points
          above should help in building your setup. Another consideration is
          the perfomance objective - whether something quick/dirty/cheap is
          acceptable, or whether the requirement is for something
          safe/reliable/durable in a machine environment.

          If you Google "wire table" you'll find information for wire
          specifications/standards/recommendations based upon a number of
          factors listed above. This should help you get started.

          Danny

          --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "upand_at_them"
          <upand_at_them@...> wrote:
          >
          > Robert,
          >
          > CAT5 is not designed to power anything; it's for carrying signals.
          >
          > Mike
          >
          > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "learnin_lathe"
          > <learnin_lathe@> wrote:
          > >
          > > For those who have already done a CNC conversion, what type of
          wire
          > > did you use to wire everything up? I was considering using cat5
          > > network cable,but I'm not sure if it can handle the load. Any
          > > suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
          > >
          > > Robert
          > >
          >
        • Danny Stone
          Can you describe your setup?
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 8, 2008
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            Can you describe your setup?

            > > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "learnin_lathe"
            > > <learnin_lathe@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > For those who have already done a CNC conversion, what type of
            > wire
            > > > did you use to wire everything up? I was considering using cat5
            > > > network cable,but I'm not sure if it can handle the load. Any
            > > > suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
            > > >
            > > > Robert
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • Danny Stone
            ... Should be *100* meters (not 300 meters). I think in feet...
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 8, 2008
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              Correction (below):

              --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "Danny Stone" <dansto@...> wrote:
              >
              > This is not entirely correct. The Power Over Ethernet standard (PoE,
              > IEEE 802.3ae/at) provide for around 30W power across 2 pairs * 48V
              > nominal up to 300 meters.

              Should be *100* meters (not 300 meters). I think in feet...
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