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Another lube dripper?

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  • moparado
    I just uploaded pictures of my home-brewed lube-coolant dripper in the photos section under moparado . Thanks to mbphoton s IV dripper idea which this
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 3, 2007
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      I just uploaded pictures of my home-brewed lube-coolant dripper in the
      photos section under 'moparado'.

      Thanks to mbphoton's IV dripper idea which this contraption is based on
      with some variations. I collected a hogepoge of stuff like a heavy duty
      water bottle, the neck from a cheap flexible neck lamp, magnetic
      welding ground clamp, various plumbing HW, some aluminum stock, an
      adjustable shelving bracket and put it all together.All in all about 20
      bucks worth of stuff more or less. Works great as i can easily control
      the flow from a few drops/minute to full flow with the needle valve.

      A couple things not clear from the pictures. The magnetic base shaft is
      made out of aluminum to keep the magnetic field from transferring to
      the steel outlet tube which would collect steel chips. Also, the bottle
      has to have a hole drill in its bottom to prevent a vacuum build up. I
      seal the hole with a rubber cork when not in use or during refills.

      Here's the thing in action:

      http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o273/moparado/7Inaction.jpg

      I also uploaded pictures of my shop and a couple projects i fabricated
      with the mini-mill and lathe which i had managed to take pictures of.
      -Ken
    • Dave Mucha
      Hi Ken, nice photos, nice shop! I think the use of the magnet is less than desirable. it will hold chips and start to magnetize the mill in place you probably
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 3, 2007
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        Hi Ken,

        nice photos, nice shop!

        I think the use of the magnet is less than desirable. it will hold
        chips and start to magnetize the mill in place you probably would not
        want to have it magnetized.

        The idea of the metal flex tube to hold a plastic insert is pretty
        good. I have an old gooseneck type lamp flex that seems to be similar.

        Did you look at the loc-line stuff from Enco ? that stuff seems to be
        calling out for this application, and at low prices.

        Dave







        --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "moparado" <kenwm2@...> wrote:
        >
        > I just uploaded pictures of my home-brewed lube-coolant dripper in the
        > photos section under 'moparado'.
        >
        > Thanks to mbphoton's IV dripper idea which this contraption is based on
        > with some variations. I collected a hogepoge of stuff like a heavy duty
        > water bottle, the neck from a cheap flexible neck lamp, magnetic
        > welding ground clamp, various plumbing HW, some aluminum stock, an
        > adjustable shelving bracket and put it all together.All in all about 20
        > bucks worth of stuff more or less. Works great as i can easily control
        > the flow from a few drops/minute to full flow with the needle valve.
        >
        > A couple things not clear from the pictures. The magnetic base shaft is
        > made out of aluminum to keep the magnetic field from transferring to
        > the steel outlet tube which would collect steel chips. Also, the bottle
        > has to have a hole drill in its bottom to prevent a vacuum build up. I
        > seal the hole with a rubber cork when not in use or during refills.
        >
        > Here's the thing in action:
        >
        > http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o273/moparado/7Inaction.jpg
        >
        > I also uploaded pictures of my shop and a couple projects i fabricated
        > with the mini-mill and lathe which i had managed to take pictures of.
        > -Ken
        >
      • moparado
        Dave thanks for the comments, Sad to say that squeaky clean shop of a couple years ago when i set it up is not representative of what it looks like today. I
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 3, 2007
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          Dave thanks for the comments,
          Sad to say that squeaky clean shop of a couple years ago when i set
          it up is not representative of what it looks like today. I was gonna
          take a current picture but was too ashamed to post it!!!

          Yep you're right, magnets especially strong magnets are always
          problematic around steel chips. And this is a very strong magnetic
          base which i salvaged from a magnetic welding ground clamp i never
          used. They run about $6 or 7 new from HF.
          I thought long and hard about clamps, permanently fixing the feed
          tube to the mill, etc. but in the end i felt the flexibility of the
          magnetic mount would outweigh the nuisance of chip clings. I use a
          magnetic base lamp at times on the mill table and a stiff bristled
          brush, shop vac or blast from the air compressor cleans it up nicely.
          I also plan to mount the magnet base primarily to the side of the
          mill head which will hopefully minimize the chip-cling problem. We'll
          see.

          I was tempted to order one of those coolant feed tubes from Enco but
          i wanted this thing to be as cost effective as possible. Most
          parts i had lying around just collecting spiders except for the
          valve, the barbed tubing fitting and the adj. shelving bracket which
          cost a total of around $15.
          The best part of all this is.... it works great!
          Gonna make a couple more, a dedicated one for my lathe and a moveable
          one for my grinders and drill presses out in the barn workshop.
          -Ken

          -------------------------------
          "Dave Mucha" <dave_mucha@...> wrote:
          Hi Ken,
          nice photos, nice shop!
          I think the use of the magnet is less than desirable. it will hold
          chips and start to magnetize the mill in place you probably would not
          > want to have it magnetized.
          The idea of the metal flex tube to hold a plastic insert is pretty
          good. I have an old gooseneck type lamp flex that seems to be
          similar.
          Did you look at the loc-line stuff from Enco ? that stuff seems to be
          calling out for this application, and at low prices.
          Dave

          -------------------------------------
          > --- In GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com, "moparado" <kenwm2@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I just uploaded pictures of my home-brewed lube-coolant dripper
          in the
          > > photos section under 'moparado'.
          > >
          > > Thanks to mbphoton's IV dripper idea which this contraption is
          based on
          > > with some variations. I collected a hogepoge of stuff like a
          heavy duty
          > > water bottle, the neck from a cheap flexible neck lamp, magnetic
          > > welding ground clamp, various plumbing HW, some aluminum stock,
          an
          > > adjustable shelving bracket and put it all together.All in all
          about 20
          > > bucks worth of stuff more or less. Works great as i can easily
          control
          > > the flow from a few drops/minute to full flow with the needle
          valve.
          > >
          > > A couple things not clear from the pictures. The magnetic base
          shaft is
          > > made out of aluminum to keep the magnetic field from transferring
          to
          > > the steel outlet tube which would collect steel chips. Also, the
          bottle
          > > has to have a hole drill in its bottom to prevent a vacuum build
          up. I
          > > seal the hole with a rubber cork when not in use or during
          refills.
          > >
          > > Here's the thing in action:
          > >
          > > http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o273/moparado/7Inaction.jpg
          > >
          > > I also uploaded pictures of my shop and a couple projects i
          fabricated
          > > with the mini-mill and lathe which i had managed to take pictures
          of.
          > > -Ken
          > >
          >
        • Rexarino
          Put the magnetic base in a plastic sack, twist-tied to the aluminum shank, and you can get rid of the chips easily.
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 4, 2007
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            Put the magnetic base in a plastic sack, twist-tied to the aluminum shank, and you can get rid of the chips easily.


            On Dec 3, 2007 5:22 PM, moparado <kenwm2@...
            > wrote:
            Dave thanks for the comments,
            Sad to say that squeaky clean shop of a couple years ago when i set
            it up is not representative of what it looks like today. I was gonna
            take a current picture but was too ashamed to post it!!!

            Yep you're right, magnets especially strong magnets are always
            problematic around steel chips. And this is a very strong magnetic
            base which i salvaged from a magnetic welding ground clamp i never
            used. They run about $6 or 7 new from HF.
            I thought long and hard about clamps, permanently fixing the feed
            tube to the mill, etc. but in the end i felt the flexibility of the
            magnetic mount would outweigh the nuisance of chip clings. I use a
            magnetic base lamp at times on the mill table and a stiff bristled
            brush, shop vac or blast from the air compressor cleans it up nicely.
            I also plan to mount the magnet base primarily to the side of the
            mill head which will hopefully minimize the chip-cling problem. We'll
            see.

            I was tempted to order one of those coolant feed tubes from Enco but
            i wanted this thing to be as cost effective as possible. Most
            parts i had lying around just collecting spiders except for the
            valve, the barbed tubing fitting and the adj. shelving bracket which
            cost a total of around $15.
            The best part of all this is.... it works great!
            Gonna make a couple more, a dedicated one for my lathe and a moveable
            one for my grinders and drill presses out in the barn workshop.
            -Ken

            -------------------------------
            "Dave Mucha" <dave_mucha@...> wrote:
            Hi Ken,
            nice photos, nice shop!
            I think the use of the magnet is less than desirable. it will hold
            chips and start to magnetize the mill in place you probably would not
            > want to have it magnetized.
            The idea of the metal flex tube to hold a plastic insert is pretty
            good.   I have an old gooseneck type lamp flex that seems to be
            similar.
            Did you look at the loc-line stuff from Enco ?  that stuff seems to be
            calling out for this application, and at low prices.
            Dave
             

            snip

          • moparado
            Rexarino, now thats an idea worth trying! thanks, -Ken ... Rexarino wrote: Put the magnetic base in a plastic sack, twist-tied to the aluminum
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 5, 2007
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              Rexarino,
              now thats an idea worth trying!
              thanks,
              -Ken
              -------------------
              Rexarino <rexarino@...> wrote:
              Put the magnetic base in a plastic sack, twist-tied to the aluminum
              shank,and you can get rid of the chips easily.

              ---------------------
              > On Dec 3, 2007 5:22 PM, moparado <kenwm2@...> wrote:
              >
              > > Dave thanks for the comments,
              > > Sad to say that squeaky clean shop of a couple years ago when i
              set
              > > it up is not representative of what it looks like today. I was
              gonna
              > > take a current picture but was too ashamed to post it!!!
              > >
              > > Yep you're right, magnets especially strong magnets are always
              > > problematic around steel chips. And this is a very strong magnetic
              > > base which i salvaged from a magnetic welding ground clamp i never
              > > used. They run about $6 or 7 new from HF.
              > > I thought long and hard about clamps, permanently fixing the feed
              > > tube to the mill, etc. but in the end i felt the flexibility of
              the
              > > magnetic mount would outweigh the nuisance of chip clings. I use a
              > > magnetic base lamp at times on the mill table and a stiff bristled
              > > brush, shop vac or blast from the air compressor cleans it up
              nicely.
              > > I also plan to mount the magnet base primarily to the side of the
              > > mill head which will hopefully minimize the chip-cling problem.
              We'll
              > > see.
              > >
              > > I was tempted to order one of those coolant feed tubes from Enco
              but
              > > i wanted this thing to be as cost effective as possible. Most
              > > parts i had lying around just collecting spiders except for the
              > > valve, the barbed tubing fitting and the adj. shelving bracket
              which
              > > cost a total of around $15.
              > > The best part of all this is.... it works great!
              > > Gonna make a couple more, a dedicated one for my lathe and a
              moveable
              > > one for my grinders and drill presses out in the barn workshop.
              > > -Ken
              > >
              > > -------------------------------
              > > "Dave Mucha" <dave_mucha@> wrote:
              > > Hi Ken,
              > > nice photos, nice shop!
              > > I think the use of the magnet is less than desirable. it will hold
              > > chips and start to magnetize the mill in place you probably would
              not
              > > > want to have it magnetized.
              > > The idea of the metal flex tube to hold a plastic insert is pretty
              > > good. I have an old gooseneck type lamp flex that seems to be
              > > similar.
              > > Did you look at the loc-line stuff from Enco ? that stuff seems
              to be
              > > calling out for this application, and at low prices.
              > > Dave
              >
              >
              >
              > >
              > > snip
              > >
              >
            • metalshaper03
              ... Rexarino, I use the same trick on a long handled floor sweep magnet! use it when I m searching for a small part or screw, that decided to jump off the
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 5, 2007
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                > Rexarino <rexarino@> wrote:
                > Put the magnetic base in a plastic sack, twist-tied to the aluminum
                > shank,and you can get rid of the chips easily.


                Rexarino,

                I use the same trick on a long handled 'floor sweep' magnet! use it
                when I'm searching for a small part or screw, that decided to jump off
                the bench!!!

                Once I'm satisfied I've totally lost the part,, I then use the shop
                vac.. < and usually catch site of the 'part', just as it's sucked
                in!! :{b >

                Respect Always
                Metalshaper
              • moparado
                Yep, the magnet works great to find those small steel parts. But when the part is non-ferrous and as you indicated the shop vac is plan B. Having 3 dogs sleep
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 5, 2007
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                  Yep, the magnet works great to find those small steel parts. But when
                  the part is non-ferrous and as you indicated the shop vac is plan B.

                  Having 3 dogs sleep in the basement during the Winter nights, i gotta
                  say there's nothing more disgusting than sifting through the shop vac
                  for a lost part! If its a small nut, bolt or other replaceable part i
                  can't find with the magnet, then that thing becomes part of the shop!

                  Back to the lube dripper. I just found out that the magnet i used is
                  physically heavy and large enough to support the tube assembly without
                  adhering to a ferrous surface. I think a much longer 3/8" aluminum
                  shaft might be in order to allow another option of mounting it on the
                  work bench itself.
                  -Ken

                  ----------------------------------------
                  "metalshaper03" <dagwood@...> wrote:
                  I use the same trick on a long handled 'floor sweep' magnet! use it
                  when I'm searching for a small part or screw, that decided to jump off
                  the bench!!!
                  Once I'm satisfied I've totally lost the part,, I then use the shop
                  vac.. < and usually catch site of the 'part', just as it's sucked
                  > in!! :{b >
                  Respect Always
                  Metalshaper
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