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RE: [GrizHFMinimill] One-handed machining

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  • Allyn Thompson
    Well I m interested. I still have all my limbs although the legs have a few missing parts. I am of the age (77) that anything could happen and every day I
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 2, 2007

      Well I’m interested.  I still have all my limbs although the legs have a few missing parts.  I am of the age (77) that anything could happen and every day I think about how to do something if one of my arms became unraveled.  My wife’s son had cancer and had his left shoulder and arm removed. He called me a few days after the operation and announced he could tie his shoes with one hand.  I was in my late 60’s at the time and I certainly couldn’t do that. 

      I am right handed and if I were to lose the function of that arm I couldn’t even go to the bath room.  Using the mill would require me to have a therapist show me some exercises to allow me to work the hand wheels.  Maybe making the thing electronic would solve the problem.  How are you doing in that regard?   

      The little mill is a major part of my shop and I would be extremely lost with out it but life goes on and so far I am luckier than you.  No use in dwelling on it, I guess.

      I wish you a speedy recovery, my friend.  If you need help on machining a project I would be happy to assist.

      AL T


      From: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com [mailto: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Mike Dodd
      Sent: Sunday, September 02, 2007 2:54 PM
      To: GrizHFMinimill@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [GrizHFMinimill] One-handed machining

       

      a stroke in June left me without the use of my left arm and hand. I'm
      in rehab, trying to regain functionality, and the therapy seems to be
      working gradually. In the meantime, life must go on, and that includes
      machining. I've already found several projects they just can't wait
      for a full recovery. :-) so far, I've been able to do just about
      everything I need to do with the mill and lathe using just my right
      hand. This includes attaching end mill holders and a Jacobs chuck in
      the quill, as well as inserting the end mills and drill bits into the
      holders and chuck. One tricky operation is positioning the end mill so
      the flat on the shaft lines up with the holder's set screw.
      Sometimes it's a bit difficult locking the stock in the vise. But I've
      found that judicious use of parallels helps with this task.I just rest
      the stock on the parallels, and close the vise against the stock.

      measuring and marking is normally a two-handed operation, but I've
      been able to manage with one hand. I paint the surface with dye, and
      use my dial caliper jaw to mark a line at the appropriate distance
      from one end of the stock. naturally, it helps if the stock is clamped
      in the vise.

      In any case, I'm encouraged by the machining I can do with just one
      hand.I thought I'd share this, in case anyone's interested.

      --- Mike

    • Barry Young
      I think we are all encouraged by the machining you are doing Mike. Barry Young ...
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 2, 2007
        I think we are all encouraged by the machining you are
        doing Mike.

        Barry Young


        --- Mike Dodd <mike@...> wrote:

        > a stroke in June left me without the use of my left
        > arm and hand. I'm
        > in rehab, trying to regain functionality, and the
        > therapy seems to be
        > working gradually. In the meantime, life must go on,
        > and that includes
        > machining. I've already found several projects they
        > just can't wait
        > for a full recovery. :-) so far, I've been able to
        > do just about
        > everything I need to do with the mill and lathe
        > using just my right
        > hand. This includes attaching end mill holders and a
        > Jacobs chuck in
        > the quill, as well as inserting the end mills and
        > drill bits into the
        > holders and chuck. One tricky operation is
        > positioning the end mill so
        > the flat on the shaft lines up with the holder's set
        > screw.
        > Sometimes it's a bit difficult locking the stock in
        > the vise. But I've
        > found that judicious use of parallels helps with
        > this task.I just rest
        > the stock on the parallels, and close the vise
        > against the stock.
        >
        > measuring and marking is normally a two-handed
        > operation, but I've
        > been able to manage with one hand. I paint the
        > surface with dye, and
        > use my dial caliper jaw to mark a line at the
        > appropriate distance
        > from one end of the stock. naturally, it helps if
        > the stock is clamped
        > in the vise.
        >
        > In any case, I'm encouraged by the machining I can
        > do with just one
        > hand.I thought I'd share this, in case anyone's
        > interested.
        >
        >
        > --- Mike
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        > (Yahoo! ID required)
        >
        > mailto:GrizHFMinimill-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >
        >




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