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7823Fr. Rossini's Sunday Offertories for SATB and Organ (Latin texts)

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  • Bud Clark
    Dec 6, 2013
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      Dear Friends and Colleagues,

      Dan Brittain is very graciously typesetting Fr. Rossini's manuscripts. So far he has done or will do:

      1st Sunday of Advent
      4th Sunday of Advent (typeset by David Boothe)
      Christmas 1st Mass at Midnight
      Epiphany
      1st Sunday of Lent
      Easter Day
      Ascension
      Pentecost
      Trinity
      Corpus Christi

      Evidently Fr. R. didn't have a full choir for Immaculate Conception, Candlemas, Annunciation, or Assumption. Those aren't included in this collection, though pieces for those feasts are scattered through his many liturgical collections.

      My question: how many more (if any) should Dan do? Fr. Rossini wrote Offertories for all 52 Sundays, but I don't really see any point in doing the Sundays after Pentecost (beyond Corpus Christi), as most choirs take the summer off, or have chanters sing the Gregorian Propers.

      *I* would think the following would be most likely to be used:

      Advent II
      Advent III
      Lent II
      Lent III
      Lent IV
      (old) Passion Sunday
      Palm Sunday

      Although they are EASY (ALMOST sight-readable), I don't see choirs having the ENERGY to sing them in Eastertide, after the rigours of Holy Week <g>.

      In quality, they range from "Don't pass the White List 'smell test' " (a few) to "good, competent choir fodder similar to Dr. Willan's simpler anthems" (most) to "miniature masterpieces" (a few). I once had a graduate student in music history mistake one for BRUCKNER (!) when he heard it sung at Old St. Mary's in Cincinnati.

      Fr. R's genius lay in writing for AVERAGE singers, AVERAGE organists, and AVERAGE organs in such a way as to make them sound a LOT better than they would have otherwise <g>.

      What think you? (about which additional ones to typeset)

      Cheers,

      Bud