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Vietnam on UN Security Council: "Undecided" about Iran, Myanmar, Kosovo

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  • Michael Karadjis
    THE STRAITS TIMES, Dec 5, 2007 Hot seat for Vietnam on UN Security Council Hanoi will have to vote on thorny issues such as Iran and Myanmar By Roger Mitton
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 6, 2007
      THE STRAITS TIMES, Dec 5, 2007

      Hot seat for Vietnam on UN Security Council

      Hanoi will have to vote on thorny issues such as Iran and Myanmar

      By Roger Mitton


      HANOI - VIETNAMESE diplomats are working feverishly to prepare for what
      is likely to be a tough two-year term as a non-permanent member of the
      UN Security Council, beginning next year.

      Soon after it assumes the role on Jan 1, Hanoi will likely have to vote
      on sensitive and complex issues such as Myanmar, Iran and Kosovo -
      sorely testing its much- vaunted policy of being friends with everyone
      and enemies of no one.

      Said Mr Ta Minh Tuan, the deputy director at the Foreign Ministry's
      Institute for International Relations:

      'Vietnam has not made its stand clear on issues such as Iran's uranium
      enrichment programme, Myanmar's human rights and democracy, Darfur's
      genocide, Kosovo's status, North Korea's nuclear programme and the
      future of Iraq.

      'All are thorny for Vietnam. At this moment, the road ahead looks
      bumpy.'

      Diplomatic sources say that is putting it mildly. Said one Western
      diplomat last week: 'We met senior foreign office officials and asked
      what their position was on Kosovo and Sudan. They said they do not have
      one. We intimated that it might be good to start formulating one -
      pretty quickly.'

      But Hanoi has been working hard, soliciting advice from nations with
      experience on the UN Security Council, and from the five permanent
      council members.

      It has also set up a core group, including hotshot Vice-Foreign Minister
      Pham Binh Minh and human rights defender Le Hoai Trung, to liaise with
      its United Nations mission in New York and directly with Prime Minister
      Nguyen Tan Dung.

      Some conservative members of the Politburo, the Vietnamese Communist
      Party's topmost body, had counselled against the push to gain a seat on
      the Security Council.

      But they were rebuffed by ascendant younger leaders under the Prime
      Minister, who want economically booming Vietnam to play a more assertive
      role on the world stage.

      Said deputy director Bui Truong Giang of Hanoi's Centre for
      International Security and Strategic Studies: 'This is a good
      opportunity for Vietnam to make use of its post on the Security Council
      to promote its international image.'

      Certainly, the opportunity is there, especially as Vietnam will assume
      the presidency of the Security Council next July and be able to set the
      agenda and initiate debates on global issues.

      Of course, as a non-permanent member, Vietnam will not have veto powers
      and its influence as a fledgling council member will be limited.

      But, as Foreign Ministry sources noted, Hanoi will have to take a stand
      and not fudge tough votes by abstaining.

      Said Mr Tuan: 'During its term, Vietnam should avoid abstention as much
      as possible if it wants to play an active and responsible role at the
      council.'

      rogermitton@...
    • cutemelnguyen
      It would be nice to see a Socialist country with a moral foreign policy, but I won t be holding my breath. ... what ... the ... vote ... everyone ... uranium
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 6, 2007
        It would be nice to see a Socialist country with a moral foreign
        policy, but I won't be holding my breath.

        --- In GreenLeft_discussion@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Karadjis"
        <mkaradjis@...> wrote:
        >
        > THE STRAITS TIMES, Dec 5, 2007
        >
        > Hot seat for Vietnam on UN Security Council
        >
        > Hanoi will have to vote on thorny issues such as Iran and Myanmar
        >
        > By Roger Mitton
        >
        >
        > HANOI - VIETNAMESE diplomats are working feverishly to prepare for
        what
        > is likely to be a tough two-year term as a non-permanent member of
        the
        > UN Security Council, beginning next year.
        >
        > Soon after it assumes the role on Jan 1, Hanoi will likely have to
        vote
        > on sensitive and complex issues such as Myanmar, Iran and Kosovo -
        > sorely testing its much- vaunted policy of being friends with
        everyone
        > and enemies of no one.
        >
        > Said Mr Ta Minh Tuan, the deputy director at the Foreign Ministry's
        > Institute for International Relations:
        >
        > 'Vietnam has not made its stand clear on issues such as Iran's
        uranium
        > enrichment programme, Myanmar's human rights and democracy, Darfur's
        > genocide, Kosovo's status, North Korea's nuclear programme and the
        > future of Iraq.
        >
        > 'All are thorny for Vietnam. At this moment, the road ahead looks
        > bumpy.'
        >
        > Diplomatic sources say that is putting it mildly. Said one Western
        > diplomat last week: 'We met senior foreign office officials and
        asked
        > what their position was on Kosovo and Sudan. They said they do not
        have
        > one. We intimated that it might be good to start formulating one -
        > pretty quickly.'
        >
        > But Hanoi has been working hard, soliciting advice from nations with
        > experience on the UN Security Council, and from the five permanent
        > council members.
        >
        > It has also set up a core group, including hotshot Vice-Foreign
        Minister
        > Pham Binh Minh and human rights defender Le Hoai Trung, to liaise
        with
        > its United Nations mission in New York and directly with Prime
        Minister
        > Nguyen Tan Dung.
        >
        > Some conservative members of the Politburo, the Vietnamese Communist
        > Party's topmost body, had counselled against the push to gain a
        seat on
        > the Security Council.
        >
        > But they were rebuffed by ascendant younger leaders under the Prime
        > Minister, who want economically booming Vietnam to play a more
        assertive
        > role on the world stage.
        >
        > Said deputy director Bui Truong Giang of Hanoi's Centre for
        > International Security and Strategic Studies: 'This is a good
        > opportunity for Vietnam to make use of its post on the Security
        Council
        > to promote its international image.'
        >
        > Certainly, the opportunity is there, especially as Vietnam will
        assume
        > the presidency of the Security Council next July and be able to set
        the
        > agenda and initiate debates on global issues.
        >
        > Of course, as a non-permanent member, Vietnam will not have veto
        powers
        > and its influence as a fledgling council member will be limited.
        >
        > But, as Foreign Ministry sources noted, Hanoi will have to take a
        stand
        > and not fudge tough votes by abstaining.
        >
        > Said Mr Tuan: 'During its term, Vietnam should avoid abstention as
        much
        > as possible if it wants to play an active and responsible role at
        the
        > council.'
        >
        > rogermitton@...
        >
      • Michael Karadjis
        Fair enough Mel, I was just posting for informational purposes, that s why there was no comment from me. It largely also depends on what each person considers
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 7, 2007
          Fair enough Mel, I was just posting for informational purposes,
          that's why there was no comment from me. It largely also depends on
          what each person considers to be a 'moral' foreign policy. I would
          suggest that on the three issues listed in the headline, Vietnam
          will most certainly vote in defense of Iran against US interference
          and/or aggression, on that there is little doubt, and for me that
          would be very correct and 'moral'.

          VN has criticised the Burmese junta, but how far it would go in that
          criticism if the resolutin were put by the US is unclear, and they
          may have diplomatic reasons, linked to fear of 'precedent' regarding
          resolutions by imperialist powers against small countries, for
          holding back from anything too harsh. Not saying I think that's
          right, just that I think what they may feel they can or can't do
          might be diffeent from what leftists here can say and do. Difficult
          to judge to 'morality' without the specifics, fr example, condeming
          the repression, yes, but what about economic sanctions, which would
          hit the Burmese poor, and which VN itself has suffered from before?
          Ths the specifics are important.

          On Kosova, VN would be more likely again for diplomatic reasons and
          fear of 'precedent' to vote against a US-supported motion to
          recognise a limited, 'supervised' independence for Kosova. Voting
          against the US is good, but again issues are specific; in my version
          of 'morality', self-determination for Kosova is just as obvious and
          moral as slef-determination for Timor, Palestine, or for that
          matter, Vietnam, regardless of who supports it for the their own
          reasons; others on this list might have a diffeent view on
          the 'morality' of that.

          --- In GreenLeft_discussion@yahoogroups.com, "cutemelnguyen"
          <cutemelnguyen@...> wrote:
          >
          > It would be nice to see a Socialist country with a moral foreign
          > policy, but I won't be holding my breath.
          >
          > --- In GreenLeft_discussion@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Karadjis"
          > <mkaradjis@> wrote:
          > >
          > > THE STRAITS TIMES, Dec 5, 2007
          > >
          > > Hot seat for Vietnam on UN Security Council
          > >
          > > Hanoi will have to vote on thorny issues such as Iran and Myanmar
          > >
          > > By Roger Mitton
          > >
          > >
          > > HANOI - VIETNAMESE diplomats are working feverishly to prepare
          for
          > what
          > > is likely to be a tough two-year term as a non-permanent member
          of
          > the
          > > UN Security Council, beginning next year.
          > >
          > > Soon after it assumes the role on Jan 1, Hanoi will likely have
          to
          > vote
          > > on sensitive and complex issues such as Myanmar, Iran and
          Kosovo -
          > > sorely testing its much- vaunted policy of being friends with
          > everyone
          > > and enemies of no one.
          > >
          > > Said Mr Ta Minh Tuan, the deputy director at the Foreign
          Ministry's
          > > Institute for International Relations:
          > >
          > > 'Vietnam has not made its stand clear on issues such as Iran's
          > uranium
          > > enrichment programme, Myanmar's human rights and democracy,
          Darfur's
          > > genocide, Kosovo's status, North Korea's nuclear programme and
          the
          > > future of Iraq.
          > >
          > > 'All are thorny for Vietnam. At this moment, the road ahead looks
          > > bumpy.'
          > >
          > > Diplomatic sources say that is putting it mildly. Said one
          Western
          > > diplomat last week: 'We met senior foreign office officials and
          > asked
          > > what their position was on Kosovo and Sudan. They said they do
          not
          > have
          > > one. We intimated that it might be good to start formulating
          one -
          > > pretty quickly.'
          > >
          > > But Hanoi has been working hard, soliciting advice from nations
          with
          > > experience on the UN Security Council, and from the five
          permanent
          > > council members.
          > >
          > > It has also set up a core group, including hotshot Vice-Foreign
          > Minister
          > > Pham Binh Minh and human rights defender Le Hoai Trung, to
          liaise
          > with
          > > its United Nations mission in New York and directly with Prime
          > Minister
          > > Nguyen Tan Dung.
          > >
          > > Some conservative members of the Politburo, the Vietnamese
          Communist
          > > Party's topmost body, had counselled against the push to gain a
          > seat on
          > > the Security Council.
          > >
          > > But they were rebuffed by ascendant younger leaders under the
          Prime
          > > Minister, who want economically booming Vietnam to play a more
          > assertive
          > > role on the world stage.
          > >
          > > Said deputy director Bui Truong Giang of Hanoi's Centre for
          > > International Security and Strategic Studies: 'This is a good
          > > opportunity for Vietnam to make use of its post on the Security
          > Council
          > > to promote its international image.'
          > >
          > > Certainly, the opportunity is there, especially as Vietnam will
          > assume
          > > the presidency of the Security Council next July and be able to
          set
          > the
          > > agenda and initiate debates on global issues.
          > >
          > > Of course, as a non-permanent member, Vietnam will not have veto
          > powers
          > > and its influence as a fledgling council member will be limited.
          > >
          > > But, as Foreign Ministry sources noted, Hanoi will have to take
          a
          > stand
          > > and not fudge tough votes by abstaining.
          > >
          > > Said Mr Tuan: 'During its term, Vietnam should avoid abstention
          as
          > much
          > > as possible if it wants to play an active and responsible role
          at
          > the
          > > council.'
          > >
          > > rogermitton@
          > >
          >
        • cutemelnguyen
          I was just worried that they might side with the USA against Iran. But I m reassured that you think they won t. I m probably just too pesimistic. :-) You are
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 7, 2007
            I was just worried that they might side with the USA against Iran.
            But I'm reassured that you think they won't. I'm probably just too
            pesimistic. :-) You are no doubt correct.

            --- In GreenLeft_discussion@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Karadjis"
            <mkaradjis@...> wrote:
            >
            > Fair enough Mel, I was just posting for informational purposes,
            > that's why there was no comment from me. It largely also depends on
            > what each person considers to be a 'moral' foreign policy. I would
            > suggest that on the three issues listed in the headline, Vietnam
            > will most certainly vote in defense of Iran against US interference
            > and/or aggression, on that there is little doubt, and for me that
            > would be very correct and 'moral'.
            >
            > VN has criticised the Burmese junta, but how far it would go in
            that
            > criticism if the resolutin were put by the US is unclear, and they
            > may have diplomatic reasons, linked to fear of 'precedent'
            regarding
            > resolutions by imperialist powers against small countries, for
            > holding back from anything too harsh. Not saying I think that's
            > right, just that I think what they may feel they can or can't do
            > might be diffeent from what leftists here can say and do. Difficult
            > to judge to 'morality' without the specifics, fr example, condeming
            > the repression, yes, but what about economic sanctions, which would
            > hit the Burmese poor, and which VN itself has suffered from before?
            > Ths the specifics are important.
            >
            > On Kosova, VN would be more likely again for diplomatic reasons and
            > fear of 'precedent' to vote against a US-supported motion to
            > recognise a limited, 'supervised' independence for Kosova. Voting
            > against the US is good, but again issues are specific; in my
            version
            > of 'morality', self-determination for Kosova is just as obvious and
            > moral as slef-determination for Timor, Palestine, or for that
            > matter, Vietnam, regardless of who supports it for the their own
            > reasons; others on this list might have a diffeent view on
            > the 'morality' of that.
            >
            > --- In GreenLeft_discussion@yahoogroups.com, "cutemelnguyen"
            > <cutemelnguyen@> wrote:
            > >
            > > It would be nice to see a Socialist country with a moral foreign
            > > policy, but I won't be holding my breath.
            > >
            > > --- In GreenLeft_discussion@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Karadjis"
            > > <mkaradjis@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > THE STRAITS TIMES, Dec 5, 2007
            > > >
            > > > Hot seat for Vietnam on UN Security Council
            > > >
            > > > Hanoi will have to vote on thorny issues such as Iran and
            Myanmar
            > > >
            > > > By Roger Mitton
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > HANOI - VIETNAMESE diplomats are working feverishly to prepare
            > for
            > > what
            > > > is likely to be a tough two-year term as a non-permanent member
            > of
            > > the
            > > > UN Security Council, beginning next year.
            > > >
            > > > Soon after it assumes the role on Jan 1, Hanoi will likely have
            > to
            > > vote
            > > > on sensitive and complex issues such as Myanmar, Iran and
            > Kosovo -
            > > > sorely testing its much- vaunted policy of being friends with
            > > everyone
            > > > and enemies of no one.
            > > >
            > > > Said Mr Ta Minh Tuan, the deputy director at the Foreign
            > Ministry's
            > > > Institute for International Relations:
            > > >
            > > > 'Vietnam has not made its stand clear on issues such as Iran's
            > > uranium
            > > > enrichment programme, Myanmar's human rights and democracy,
            > Darfur's
            > > > genocide, Kosovo's status, North Korea's nuclear programme and
            > the
            > > > future of Iraq.
            > > >
            > > > 'All are thorny for Vietnam. At this moment, the road ahead
            looks
            > > > bumpy.'
            > > >
            > > > Diplomatic sources say that is putting it mildly. Said one
            > Western
            > > > diplomat last week: 'We met senior foreign office officials and
            > > asked
            > > > what their position was on Kosovo and Sudan. They said they do
            > not
            > > have
            > > > one. We intimated that it might be good to start formulating
            > one -
            > > > pretty quickly.'
            > > >
            > > > But Hanoi has been working hard, soliciting advice from nations
            > with
            > > > experience on the UN Security Council, and from the five
            > permanent
            > > > council members.
            > > >
            > > > It has also set up a core group, including hotshot Vice-Foreign
            > > Minister
            > > > Pham Binh Minh and human rights defender Le Hoai Trung, to
            > liaise
            > > with
            > > > its United Nations mission in New York and directly with Prime
            > > Minister
            > > > Nguyen Tan Dung.
            > > >
            > > > Some conservative members of the Politburo, the Vietnamese
            > Communist
            > > > Party's topmost body, had counselled against the push to gain a
            > > seat on
            > > > the Security Council.
            > > >
            > > > But they were rebuffed by ascendant younger leaders under the
            > Prime
            > > > Minister, who want economically booming Vietnam to play a more
            > > assertive
            > > > role on the world stage.
            > > >
            > > > Said deputy director Bui Truong Giang of Hanoi's Centre for
            > > > International Security and Strategic Studies: 'This is a good
            > > > opportunity for Vietnam to make use of its post on the Security
            > > Council
            > > > to promote its international image.'
            > > >
            > > > Certainly, the opportunity is there, especially as Vietnam will
            > > assume
            > > > the presidency of the Security Council next July and be able to
            > set
            > > the
            > > > agenda and initiate debates on global issues.
            > > >
            > > > Of course, as a non-permanent member, Vietnam will not have
            veto
            > > powers
            > > > and its influence as a fledgling council member will be limited.
            > > >
            > > > But, as Foreign Ministry sources noted, Hanoi will have to take
            > a
            > > stand
            > > > and not fudge tough votes by abstaining.
            > > >
            > > > Said Mr Tuan: 'During its term, Vietnam should avoid abstention
            > as
            > > much
            > > > as possible if it wants to play an active and responsible role
            > at
            > > the
            > > > council.'
            > > >
            > > > rogermitton@
            > > >
            > >
            >
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