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141RE: [Grand_Jury] Grand jury Rules

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  • Ken (desco) Ramsey
    Feb 28, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Jury nullification works both ways.

      Ron Killings case jurors speak: State had no proof

      Juror: "I commend this man for doing his job"

      By MARK BELL • GANNETT TENNESSEE • February 19, 2010 http://www.tennessean.com/article/20100219/NEWS03/100219007/Ron+Killings+case+jurors+speak++State+had+no+proof+

      At least two jurors who acquitted Ron Killings of reckless homicide feel they made the right decision in the case based on the evidence they heard.

      Raymond Lowry, juror No. 3, and Kerri Aslinger, juror No. 5, both of Hamilton County, sat in on the three-day-long trial for the former Rutherford County Sheriff's detective who was accused in the death of 11-year-old Lakeisha White. "The defense attorney wouldn't have even had to say one word for me to find him not guilty," Lowry said in a Wednesday phone interview this week. "The state didn't have enough proof and that was the bottom line. This man was doing his job."

      Killings testified Feb. 11 that he was en route to back up another detective when he struck White with his vehicle as she tried to cross Bradyville Pike in July 2008. Aslinger said she felt the same — based on the evidence at the time. "My personal decision was based on the proof and the evidence of the state," she said. "They couldn't bring enough evidence to the case that would've had me to convict him."

      The officer was traveling 60 in a 30 zone, unmarked car without emergency equipment running when the child was struck and killed. There are still tampering with evidence charges still pending.

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Grand_Jury@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Grand_Jury@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Jon Roland
      Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2010 3:41 PM
      To: x@...
      Cc: grandjury@...; Grand_Jury@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Grand_Jury] Grand jury Rules

      Your set contains a few errors. The standard that emerged was that the grand jury be 23, randomly selected rather than elected by some kind of balloting process, and that all decisions be made by at least 12. The quorum would typically be a number like 16, but if only 12 met they would have to be unanimous. Although originally trial and grand juries were not separated, what emerged was a separation into the investigatory/accusatory (grand) and the verdicatory (petit) functions.

      For what we are discussing related to grand juries see State Nullification of Federal Action.
      -- Jon
      
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