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Re: [Goat_Friends] Digest Number 19

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  • woodny@juno.com
    Dear imp, Thank you for this, (and for a good cry). Wow. Hits me in the guts. Had a dear, bottleraised pet lamb as a young girl of 13, who I loved very much,
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 1, 2002
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      Dear imp,
      Thank you for this, (and for a good cry). Wow. Hits me in the guts.
      Had a dear, bottleraised pet lamb as a young girl of 13, who I loved
      very much, and who was suddenly sold away without warning without a
      chance to say goodbye..... almost 5 decades later, never ate lamb again
      and never will. Still think of her, as I love my goaties today.
      Snowflake's Mom
      On 1 Apr 2002 04:56:51 -0000 Goat_Friends@yahoogroups.com writes:

      > Please visit our other friends at these fine locations:
      >
      > http://clubs.yahoo.com/clubs/teensforanimalrightsclub
      > http://clubs.yahoo.com/clubs/friendsofdeer
      > http://www.vegsource.com/animal/concerns/index.html
      >
      > cheers, da imp
      >
      > ...
      >
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      >
      > There is 1 message in this issue.
      >
      > Topics in this digest:
      >
      > 1. imp's Easter Sunday Sermon
      > From: "iimpster" <iimpster@...>
      >
      >
      >
      ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 1
      > Date: Sun, 31 Mar 2002 19:21:58 -0000
      > From: "iimpster" <iimpster@...>
      > Subject: imp's Easter Sunday Sermon
      >
      > EASTERTIME AND THE LAMBS OF GOD
      >
      > It is the Lenten season and as Easter draws near, the stores are
      > overstocked with greeting cards that depict baby lambs frolicking in
      >
      > green meadows or running through flower-filled fields with the
      > little
      > children who are as innocent and carefree as the animals with whom
      > they romp. And for the more religiously inclined, there are cards
      > which depict the Christ, so often portrayed as the Good Shepherd. He
      >
      > is shown tenderly carrying a lamb who looks lovingly into the face
      > of
      > its protector. The messages inside these cards speak of love and
      > renewal--of new beginnings.
      >
      > The fashion industry also uses these springtime images of
      > resurrection and new life to sell Easter outfits. Newspaper ads use
      >
      > drawings of wild flowers and little lambs, implying a connection
      > between these pastoral images of innocence and youth and the people
      > who will wear the clothes.
      >
      > During this season it seems that the whole world rejoices in the
      > exuberant lamb and the springtime world into which it has been born.
      >
      > And although most of their readers live in a world of concrete
      > sidewalks and hi-rise buildings, even THE NEW YORK TIMES joins in
      > this celebration of things pastoral. In fact, one of their
      > columnists
      > became quite poetic in her appreciation of springtime, in general,
      > and little lambs, in particular. In the Sunday Magazine section
      > Molly
      > O'Neill wrote, movingly, that "animal and shepherd wander the grassy
      >
      > knoll without destination or care, a romantic idyll of innocence and
      >
      > freedom." She went on to say that "even without religious
      > implications, young lambs invite a communion with nature."
      >
      > Then Molly tells us how to achieve this communion with nature: Kill
      >
      > and eat the carefree, young lamb. She is a food editor, and the
      > headline of her column explains her position: "A Little Lamb Eats
      > Ivy: And clover. And fennel. And Garlic. Which Explains Why it
      > Tastes
      > So Good." She goes on to praise the lambs for eating those things,
      > because their diet provides "built-in seasonings" for those who will
      >
      > devour it.
      >
      > In this article, Molly continues to writes lyrically about her
      > subject. She informs her readers that because baby lambs are "born
      > in
      > the month just prior to their slaughter, they will have grazed on
      > young grasses like clover or on the salty marsh grasses of France
      > and
      > Ireland. The delicate herbaceousness of the meat is like an edible
      > postcard from the animal's hometown."
      >
      > In addition to her definition of lambs as "edible postcards" this
      > food editor reports her theological insights regarding the slaughter
      >
      > of those innocents. Ms. O'Neill informs her readers that
      > in "sacrificing an innocent we acknowledge the basic human paradox,
      >
      > that in order to live we take life." (Note: she does not even try to
      >
      > claim that we HAVE to take life in order to exist.) In her role as
      > theologian/chef, Molly also explains that "those who baste the lamb
      >
      > after letting its blood, for Easter or Ramadan, feel chastened and
      > protective. Reminded of their darkside, they look forward to the
      > light."
      >
      > These uplifting thoughts are followed by her recipe for "Baby Leg of
      >
      > Lamb." A full-color picture accompanies the article. It is an artsy
      >
      > photograph of a giant, raw lamb chop, haloed by the golden flames
      > which will soon make it an "edible postcard."
      >
      > But it is not only the semi-sophisticated readers of THE NEW YORK
      > TIMES who accept this obscene juxtaposition of praise for
      > the "innocence and freedom" of the newborn lamb with a recipe that
      > calls for "2 legs of baby lamb (4 lbs each.)" Most people live with
      >
      > this schizophrenic contradiction.
      >
      > An Easter catalog, "Expressions of Faith: Christian Cards and Gifts"
      >
      > arrived in the mail. It is definitely not for the sophisticate and
      > there are no artsy photos. Both the illustrations and the text are
      > best described as "precious." But the contradictory message it gives
      >
      > is the same as that which is found in more urbane publications.
      >
      > One of the catalog's offerings is an Easter card series called "Warm
      >
      > & Whimsical." The first one features a baby lamb, delighted by the
      > spring flowers that surround it. The inside message says "May the
      > beauty of God's creation brighten your Easter season."
      >
      > This is a chilling sentiment when one realizes that for those who
      > receive these cards, the little lamb who expresses the "beauty of
      > God's creation" will probably "brighten" the season by ending up,
      > dead, on their plates for Easter Sunday dinner.
      >
      > The catalog also offers Easter place mats for sale. Baby animals
      > form
      > the motif: cuddly bunnies, tiny chicks, and of course, a little
      > lamb,
      > are depicted. A prayer--grace before meals--is also printed on the
      > mat. "For flowers and lambs and birds that sing, we thank you, Lord,
      >
      > for everything. Amen."
      >
      > Do those who order these mats say this particular prayer of
      > thanksgiving just before they cannibalize the lamb on their dinner
      > plate?
      >
      > Why not? Many who honor Jesus Christ celebrate his escape from the
      > grave by condemning to death tens of thousands of gentle lambs. They
      >
      > will be brutally slaughtered so their corpses can be devoured on
      > Easter Sunday--with thanks to God, and in honor of The Good
      > Shepherd.
      >
      > "Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do."
      >
      > Copyright 1998 by Humane Religion.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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