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Aramaic Lords Prayer - Part 1

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  • John Gilbert
    Gentlepeople, The language the Master Jesus used in his teaching and everyday is is a dialect of the Syriac language called Aramaic. Though I studied Aramaic
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 4, 2007
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      Gentlepeople,

      The language the Master Jesus used in his
      teaching and everyday is is a dialect of the
      Syriac language called Aramaic. Though I studied
      Aramaic for a year in seminary, I am not an
      Aramaic scholar by any stretch of the
      imagination. All I really know is how to use a
      good Aramaic-to-English dictionary and read what
      others have to say. The beauty of this is that
      most Aramaic scholars agree on the Aramaic
      version of the Lord's Prayer. So, here we go...

      Aramaic Lords Prayer - Part One

      The first Aramaic word of this prayer is Abwoon
      which is translated in most Christian bibles as
      "Our Father." To be sure, one of the possible
      translations of Abwoon is indeed "Our Father."
      But there are several other translations with
      exactly the same validity. Abwoon is also both
      genders, so it is both mother and father. But,
      Abwoon is also not gender specific so it is also
      either father or mother. Abwoon is singular or
      plural so it is also both father and mother.
      Abwoon is your Abwoon, my Abwoon, and our Abwoon.
      Abwoon is all of these things:

      1. Our Father
      2. Our Mother
      3. Our Mother and Father
      4. Your Father
      5. Your Mother
      6. Your Father and Mother
      7. My Mother
      8. My Father
      9. My Father and Mother

      But that's only the beginning. Not only is Abwoon
      all of these things, it is also gender-less.
      Therefore, other translations of the word Abwoon
      could also include:

      10. My Creator
      11. Your Creator
      12. Our Creator
      13. Their Creator
      14. My Creator, Father and Mother
      15. Your Creator, Mother and Father
      16. Our Creator, Father and Mother
      17. Their Creator, Mother and Father
      18. The Creator
      19. The Creator and Mother
      20. The Creator and Father
      21. The Creator, Father and Mother
      22. The Source of Everything
      23. The Source
      24. The One Being
      25. The One Thing

      But we've only begun. "Our Father" was not merely
      one possible translation out of twenty-five, it
      was one translation out of hundreds of
      possibilities. See for yourself. Think of every
      word that could possible mean father, mother,
      creator, source, one, one thing, only thing, one
      being... etc. etc. Then look these words up in a
      Thesaurus and add all of the other possible words
      that could be used to describe the Divine. Abwoon
      means all of these and more.

      We are all a part of Abwoon. Everything is a part
      of Abwoon and Abwoon is a part of everything. We
      cannot conceive of anything that is not Abwoon.
      It is impossible because we are a part of Abwoon
      - all of us and everything else that is.

      So, with all of these possible translations, why
      did the male-dominated church of the first four
      hundred years of the New Era choose to use the
      singular masculine form of the creative aspect of
      Abwoon? Why? Indeed!

      Oh, did I forget to mention that Abwoon is not
      only the creative principle but the sustaining,
      nurturing and destroying principle as well?
      Abwoon is memory and everything that ever was.
      Abwoon is imagination and everything that ever
      will be. Abwoon is mind and every thought and
      everything that is now.

      Pick a word that means any of these things and
      that's Abwoon. Those who pray: "Our Mother, who
      are in Heaven," are every bit as correct as those
      who use any other word that can be assigned to
      Abwoon.

      I suspect the world would be a different place if
      the church had used a different word to describe
      Abwoon. Next week we'll consider the second word
      of the Aramaic version of this prayer. (If you
      think this is good, it only gets better. If you
      think this is bad, it only gets worse. Abwoon is
      like that.)

      Peace,
      John
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