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Re: Adam & Christ

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  • Wayne Ferguson
    Here is my take on Adam and Christ: In the Christian tradition, Jesus is the archetype of recollection. He remembers his relationship to the Father (I and my
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 1, 2005
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      Here is my take on Adam and Christ:

      In the Christian tradition, Jesus is the archetype of recollection.
      He remembers his relationship to the Father (I and my Father are
      one) and dwells, here and now, in the Kingdom of God (Luke 17:20-12,
      Gospel of Thomas 113 <http://www.gnosis.org/naghamm/gthlamb.html>).
      In contrast, the archetype of denial is Adam who forgets his
      relationship to God and abandons his place in paradise by eating the
      fruit of "the tree of the knowledge of good and evil" (Genesis 2:17,
      3:1ff). As such, he begins to treat his relative existence as
      absolute and becomes preoccupied with the relative oppositions of
      good and evil
      <http://www.searchforlight.org/lotusgroove/beyondgooodandevil.htm>
      which pertain only to his particular existence. But whereas Adam is
      "the fallen man" in whom the Image of God is obscured, Jesus is the
      incarnation and revelation of God. Whereas Adam fears death (which
      is construed as punishment for sin), Jesus takes up his cross
      (redemptively) and dies freely, innocently, and with out the spirit
      of revenge ("father forgive them, for they know not what they do").
      By remembering our Divine essence we, likewise, participate in the
      incarnation and revelation of God. When we forget our Divine essence
      and live as if the meaning of our life is exausted by our bodily
      existence, we participate in the "fall of creation" which obscures
      the Divine image in this world. --from With Reference to the Good
      <http://www.thefourprecepts.com/propublish/art.php?artid=24>


      And, pertaining to our falleness:

      The polar opposition of good and evil
      <http://www.searchforlight.org/lotusgroove/beyondgooodandevil.htm>
      are relative terms which pertain only to relative existence and are
      perceived only by relatively existent individuals that are competing
      with one another over limited material resources. Reality is not
      ultimately characterized by this dichotomy. God (and what I referred
      to, above <#trinity>, as the eternal creation or Image of God) IS
      absolutely and is Absolutely Good--the One without a second
      <http://www.kheper.net/topics/Vedanta/main.htm>. In contrast, the
      temporal creation, i.e. the apparent world, is the incarnation of
      God and is in some sense a reflection of that eternal Image (i.e. an
      image of an image). For it is the eternal Image of God-- the Word or
      Logos --that in some mysterious way is also born and suffers and
      dies in each incarnate individual. From this perspective, what we
      call natural evil can be understood as an incomplete or distorted
      reflection of the Eternal Good. It pertains to the Divine nature
      insofar as-- but only insofar as --God is incarnate. But if the
      temporal creation is indeed the incarnation of God, we can better
      understand why Christ is said to be the lamb slain from the
      foundation of the world and we need not wonder why an all powerful,
      all loving Deity permits his creation to suffer in this way. Rather
      than being an apparent injustice that God inflicts upon his hapless
      creatures, it is an element of the Divine perfection in which we
      participate. This is the passion of the Christ.

      But the temporal creation is not only the incarnation of God which,
      in and of itself, seems to imply the experience of suffering and
      death for each member in particular. It is also quite appropriately
      characterised as a fallen creation, the suffering of which is
      profoundly complicated by our original sin. In part, of course, the
      temporal creation can be described as fallen simply in contrast to
      the eternal creation of which it is a relatively imperfect or
      incomplete reflection. But over and above the suffering and death
      which is intrinsic to incarnation, we have perennially added insult
      to injury when, forgetful of our race and worth, we become
      inordinately concerned with our relative experience of good and evil
      <http://www.searchforlight.org/lotusgroove/beyondgooodandevil.htm>.
      As a result of this preoccupation, we feel compelled to exploit both
      our physical environment and our fellow human beings in order to
      gain some material advantage in our struggle for existence. This is
      the genesis of moral evil for which we are in a very real sense
      responsible, both individually and collectively. Moral evil can be
      transcended insofar as we let go of our preoccupation with that
      forbidden fruit and hold fast to our true vocation which is to
      remember our Divine essence and recollect our place in the eternal
      creation. Doing this, however, requires that we take up our cross
      and that we forgive those who in their present state of ignorance do
      unnecessary violence to both themselves and others: Father forgive
      them, for they know not what they do. --from The Primary
      Ontological Distinction
      <http://www.thefourprecepts.com/propublish/art.php?artid=32>

      Just some thoughts...

      --
      Wayne Ferguson
      wayneferguson@...
      http://www.TheFourPrecepts.com/

      GnosticThought@yahoogroups.com wrote:

      >--- George Harvey <georgeharvey@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >>Jesus was the second Adam. What did the first Adam
      >>represent? What did the
      >>name Adam mean? If Jesus was the second Adam then he
      >>must have represented
      >>the same thing the first Adam represented. So Jesus
      >>must have meant that no
      >>man comes to the father except by that which Adam
      >>and he represent.
      >>
      >>
      >>



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • George Harvey
      ... Exactly. The higher self. In contrast, the archetype of denial is Adam who forgets his ... And this is the physical self. George
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 4, 2005
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        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: wayneferguson@...
        > Sent: Fri, 01 Jul 2005 07:29:58 -0400
        > To: gnosticthought@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [GnosticThought] Re: Adam & Christ
        >
        > Here is my take on Adam and Christ:
        >
        > In the Christian tradition, Jesus is the archetype of recollection.
        > He remembers his relationship to the Father (I and my Father are
        > one) and dwells, here and now, in the Kingdom of God (Luke 17:20-12,
        > Gospel of Thomas 113

        Exactly. The higher self.

        In contrast, the archetype of denial is Adam who forgets his
        > relationship to God

        And this is the physical self.

        George
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