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616FW: Clayton Town Crier -- July 2013

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  • Max Heffler
    Jul 25 3:54 PM
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      Clayton Town Crier -- July 2013

       

      Clayton Town Crier -- July 2013

      Your source for all the news from Clayton Library
      Volume 6                                                                                                                                Issue 4
      Clayton Library Center for Genealogical Research
      5300 Caroline, Houston, TX 77004
      832-393-2600

      Manager's corner...

      Re-examining Your Accumulated Research

      Last week I was preparing for a presentation to a group at a conference.  My topic was the usual, Beginning Genealogy: an overview of the Clayton Library resources.  And, since it was a librarian’s conference, I included information on how to help a family history researcher when you do not work in a genealogy library or are not a genealogy librarian.

      While preparing, I was looking over some of the information I have on my mother’s side of the family.  The 1940 census sheet, which I have looked over numerous times, was on top of the pile.  I looked at this printout over and over again.  I got a new digital image of it for the presentation from the census records at Ancestry Library Edition at the library.  After getting the entry, I was looking over the initial results screen; the screen with the transcribed basic information about the individual.  Birth date, ethnicity, place of birth, etc. are listed… the usual “stuff.”  But wait, there on the screen was information that my grandmother only went through three years of high school.  Really???  This is a fact I never knew before.  It was not one that I had discussed with my grandmother, nor one that she told me about.  This fact, as many that we find do, went to the grave with her in 2001.  However, even after 12 years, I can still find missing information about her.  All I had to do was re-examine what I had already accumulated.  Why didn’t I notice that 14 months ago when I first looked at the 1940 census sheet?  How could I have missed that?

      When we pursue our family history, it is often with a specific question in mind.  This almost puts blinders on us.  Blinders that often discounts other information that can be found in the document that is screaming for us to look at it, but is often missed until years later, when we “happen upon” that information, as I did.  I always wondered what type of education my grandmother had.  However, to discover this, I thought I would have to figure out what high school she went to.  Maybe I would have to track down school records, which is not an easy task.  Look for documents that I inherited when she passed, and maybe even after all of that not discover anything new.  But lo and behold, there on the 1940 Federal Population Census, in column number 14 (highest grade of school completed) was listed how much education she had attained - 3 years of high school.  A new discovery… Wow!!!  

      All this is to say, look over what you have accumulated throughout your years, or months of family history research.  Read the wills, the probates, the land records you have.  The point of the original document accumulation might have been fueled by another question that was answered.  We all know that there are thousands of questions about our family that we would love answered.  Clues, or maybe even the answers themselves, might already be in your hands.  Figure out what you are looking for, and what documents you might have that can help uncover that piece of information you are looking for.

      Maybe at one point you were looking for parental evidence.  You found a will or probate that gives the parents for your ancestor.  Now, you are interested in who were the ancestor’s siblings.  The will you have in your possession might already list those individuals, but because you were very directed on one pursuit when you found that original document, you didn’t notice, or weren’t aware of the importance of that supplemental information that is included in the inventory of the will.  But there they are, all the siblings and the inheritance they received.  This type of treasure hunt begins with asking yourself “I wonder what I have in my files already” that might help me uncover my new research question.  This could save you a lot of time with your research.

      In this issue of the Clayton Town Crier, you have an opportunity to learn about the 1880 Federal Census of Defective, Delinquent and Dependant individuals.  This census is only recognized to be applicable to families in which tick marks appear in health columns (numbers 15-20) on the 1880 Federal Population Census.  This is an example of the importance of evaluating the whole document you are looking at.  People that have tick marks in these columns might have spent time in an institution or under care that might explain other mysteries in your family history.

      We hope that you make plenty of discoveries in your research.  We remind you to continually go over those documents in hopes of discovering a treasured piece of information that helps you break through a brick wall!

      Enjoy researching!

      Sue Kaufman
      Clayton Library Manager

      Spotlight on.

      Family/Surname Sources at Clayton Library

      Most of Clayton Library’s research materials are cataloged and shelved according to their geographic area of coverage (states/counties, countries/regions, etc.) but a sizable portion of the collection is cataloged and shelved by the surname or family name that the material covers.  Some of these materials are in book format, some are in microprint format, and some are online.  The following is a summary of various “family/surname sources” available at Clayton Library:

      Family Histories in Books

      The second floor at Clayton Library holds the collection of compiled family histories.  Unlike the books on the first floor, which are arranged alphabetically by state and county, these books are arranged alphabetically by the primary surname that the book pertains to.  For example, the book “The Jacob Smith Family of Amherst County, Virginia” has the call number S662 SMITH FAM, which indicates that it is shelved with the family histories on the second floor under the surname “Smith,” rather than with the Virginia books on the first floor.  To find all family histories on the Smith surname, visit the HPL Online Catalog at https://halan.sdp.sirsi.net/client/hou and using the advanced search type the phrase “Smith Family” in the “This exact phrase” search box, and limit the search results to Library "Clayton Library for Genealogical Research - Houston Public Library.”  You will get a list of titles and their call numbers.  Most of the titles will be filed under Smith on the shelf, but not all of them.  If Smith is not the primary surname that the book pertains to, but rather a secondary surname, then the book will be filed under the primary surname, which will be shown in the book’s call number.

      Family Histories on Microprint

      Clayton Library has thousands of family histories on microfilm, microfiche, and microcard in the Microprint Department on the second floor of the main building.  Many of the microfilms are from the collection of the LDS Family History Library in Salt Lake City, but not all.  The majority of the family history microfilms are located in cabinet 60, drawers 9, 10, and 11.  The majority of the family histories on microfiche and microcard are located in fiche cabinet 1 drawers 1 and 10 respectively.   To search for family histories on microprint for a specific surname, visit Clayton Library’s online Microprint Database at http://www2.houstonlibrary.org/cgi-bin/clayton/microprint.pl .  In the search box titled “FAMILY” (near the bottom of the screen), enter the surname you are researching (“Smith”, for example) and click “Submit Query.”  You will get a listing of all family histories on microprint pertaining to the Smith surname.  By clicking on the title of the item in the search results list, you will get description of the microprint item owned by Clayton Library including the microprint format it is on and the cabinet and drawer location it is in.  Please print this page of the item description and bring it to the Library with you, so that a staff member can help you find the specific microprint item when you visit the library.

      Family Histories in HeritageQuest Online

      Within the HPL genealogy database “HeritageQuest Online,” you will also find thousands of family histories in digital format.  HeritageQuest Online is available in-library, but is also available to remote users (who can access the database from home, for example), as long as the remote user has a valid HPL library card (referred to as a PowerCard).  To access HeritageQuest Online, visit http://www.houstonlibrary.org, select the “Research” tab, then select the “Genealogy” link, and then select “HeritageQuest Online.”  If you are accessing the database remotely, you will be prompted for your library card number and PIN.  If you do not know your PIN, visit any branch of the Houston Public library and the staff can retrieve it for you from our new library catalog system.  After entering this information and entering the database, click on “Search Books,” then click “People,” enter the title of the book (or the particular surname you are researching) in the “Person Names” box, and click “Search” (adding a first name in addition to a last name may give you better search results).  You can also go directly to the HPL Geneakogy Research page at http://www.houstonlibrary.org/genealogy and click HeritageQuest Online.

      Family Periodicals

      Clayton Library has hundreds of periodicals/journals pertaining to specific surnames, which are typically published by family associations or are self-published.  The second floor has a revolving carousel that contains the most recent issues of each of the family periodicals that Clayton Library receives on a regular basis.  To find out what periodicals might exist for the surnames you are researching, and to find out what volumes and issues we own, visit Clayton Library’s online Periodicals Database at http://www2.houstonlibrary.org/cgi-bin/clayton/periodicals.pl .  In the search box titled “Family Name” (near the bottom of the screen), enter the surname you are researching (“Smith” for example) and click “Submit Query.”  You will get a listing of all periodical titles available at the library pertaining to that surname.  By clicking on the name of the periodical in the search results list, you will get the actual volume and issue numbers (and dates of coverage) owned by the library.  Bound copies of family name periodicals are filed on the shelf along with the regular family history books covering the same surname.

      Family Vertical Files

      Family vertical files are file folders containing miscellaneous loose papers sorted alphabetically by the primary surname that the paper pertains to.  On the second floor you will find a series of filing cabinets, arranged alphabetically by surname, which contain these family vertical files.  You can open the specific drawer which contains the file folder for the surname of interest to you, pull the folder, and then look through the papers in the folder to see if there is anything of use to you.  At the far end of the row of these filing cabinets is a subset of the family vertical files called the Family Bible Records.  These bible records are copies of the family pages (typically showing birth, marriage, and death dates) from family bibles that had been donated to the library in the past.  To assist you in using the Family Vertical Files and the Family Bible Records, there are two notebooks on top of the filing cabinets, one titled “Vertical File Materials - Families” and the other titled “Bible Records in the Vertical Files”.  These notebooks show which surnames are represented in these two collections.

      “Family Maps” Series of Books (by author Gregory Boyd)

      Clayton Library has a collection of over 500 books by the author Gregory Boyd containing township/range maps for various counties in 21 states.  These detailed maps show the location of land patents obtained by individual families.  They also show the relationship of these families/land patents to other families/land patents in the same township and county.  The following states currently have family map books as part of this series: AL, AR, CO, FL, IL, IN, IA, LA, MI, MN, MS, MO, NE, NM, ND, OH, OK, SD, UT, WA, and WI.  To find out what counties are represented from these states, use the HPL Online Catalog at https://halan.sdp.sirsi.net/client/hou and enter the search “family maps and boyd and alabama” (or whatever state you are researching) and you will get a listing of family map books available at Clayton Library for all the counties of that particular state.  These books provide simple step-by-step instructions for how to use them, and there are indexes available to help you quickly find the pages containing the surnames of interest to you.

      Happy Hunting!
      Clayton Library Reference Staff

      Source limitations.

      Enumerated and Illuminated: Supplemental Schedules 1-7: Defective, Dependent and Delinquent Classes

      The 1880 census has proven to be a treasure trove of information for genealogists, due to the numerous supplementary schedules that were included at the time. Of particular note are Supplemental Schedules 1-7: Defective, Dependent and Delinquent Classes. These schedules covered the following classifications of individuals;

      •    Insane Inhabitants
      •    Idiots
      •    Deaf-Mutes
      •    Blind Inhabitants
      •    Homeless Children in Institutions
      •    Inhabitants in Prison
      •    Pauper and Indigent Inhabitants

      The amount of information collected for each category varies, but all were highly detailed for the time and overall a fascinating look into the lives of those enumerated.

      An "insane inhabitant," for example, would have been asked the following questions in addition to those already covered by the standard census.  What is the form of illness?  Does the person require confinement either usually or often as part of their affliction?  Has this person ever been a patient at any hospital or asylum for the mentally ill and if so, which hospital?  What has been the total length of time spent by the person in question in such a place?  Could the person also be classified as an epileptic?  Is the person suicidal or homicidal?

      Homeless children also are described in a detailed questionnaire in this census schedule.  Questions were asked regarding parents, such as whether or not the child was illegitimate, if the mother and father were deceased, if they had abandoned the child, or if they had surrendered control of said child over to an institution.  If the child was at an institution, further inquiries were made into the reason for institutionalization, such as crimes and frequency of convictions.  Homeless children were also asked if they fell into any of the other supplemental schedule categories such as blind, deaf-mute, or idiot.  The perception of “homeless” for the 1880 census differs from our 21st century concept, in that these children did not live on the streets, but in orphanages, almshouses, etc.  

      The blind, deaf-mutes, and those listed as “idiots” were asked to detail the length of time spent in their present condition, whether or not they were self-sufficient, the cause of their condition, and in a fascinating nod to phrenology, the size of the afflicted’s head.  The questions for paupers and indigents were similar, but included family oriented queries, such as what other members of the person's family were residing in the same establishment, usually an “almshouse.”

      The strength of these schedules lies in the anecdotal information gleaned from each entry, and can be very illustrative as to the standards of care at the time, particularly when addressing the question of where the person resides "when at home" or how they arrived in their present condition.  However, a discussion of strength leads naturally to the Achilles ’ heel of the DDD schedules, as they are often called.  Simply put, a researcher needs to know where to look.

      On the main 1880 census, the inclusion of those enumerated on the Supplemental Schedules would have been noted by a simple hash mark on one of many identical columns.  Without first finding the person in question on the main 1880 census, one may never know to look for them on the supplemental schedule.  This issue is mitigated somewhat by the indexing of the DDD schedules on Ancestry.com, which is available for in library use only as Ancestry Library Edition at Clayton Library and other HPL locations through a link on the Genealogy Research page.  Prior to the digitizing and indexing, research into this area would have been quite the time investment.

      In addition to access through Ancestry Library Edition, the following resources specifically on the subject of the 1880 Supplemental Schedules 1-7 are also available at Clayton Library.

      In the Microprint Collection:
      (please search our Microprint database for the cabinet and drawer location of these microfilms)

      Title: 1880 FEDERAL CENSUS OF AGRICULTURAL, INDUSTRIAL, DEFECTIVE, DEPENDENT AND DELINQUENT SCHEDULES
      State: IDAHO
      Record Type: CENSUS

      Author: NATIONAL ARCHIVES MICROFILM
      Title: 1880 DEPENDENT, DELINQUENT AND DEFECTIVE CLASSES
      State: LOUISIANA
      Record Type: CENSUS

      Author: NATIONAL ARCHIVES MICROFILM
      Title: NONPOPULATION SCHEDULES FOR NEW JERSEY, 1880 SUPPLEMENTAL SCHEDULES OF DEFECTIVE, DEPENDENT AND DELINQUENT CLASSES
      State: NEW JERSEY
      Record Type: CENSUS

      Author: NATIONAL ARCHIVES MICROFILM
      Title: 1880 FEDERAL CENSUS OF INDUSTRIAL, DEFECTIVE, DEPENDENT AND DELINQUENT SCHEDULES
      State: OREGON
      Record Type: CENSUS

      Author: NATIONAL ARCHIVES MICROFILM
      Title: SPECIAL CENSUS OF TENNESSEE, 1880
      State: TENNESSEE
      Record Type: CENSUS

      Author: TEXAS STATE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES MICROFILM
      Title: 1880 DEFECTIVE, DEPENDENT AND DELINQUENT CLASS
      State: TEXAS
      Record Type: CENSUS

      Author: NATIONAL ARCHIVES MICROFILM
      Title: 1880 FEDERAL CENSUS OF INDUSTRIAL, DEFECTIVE, DEPENDENT AND DELINQUENT SCHEDULES AND CENSUS
      State: WYOMING
      Record Type: CENSUS

      In the Book Collection:

       

       

       

      Florida's unfortunates : the 1880 federal census : defective, dependent, and delinquent classes - Donna Rachal Mills

      Publisher: Mills Historical Press
      Check Library Catalog Pub Date: 02/01/1993
      Share FloridaISBN-13: 9780931069086
      ISBN-10: 0931069084
      Call Number: 975.9 M657 FLA

      Federal nonpopulation census schedules in the custody of the Pennsylvania State Library : supplemental schedules dependent, defective, delinquent classes, 1880 - Virginia Simms Toney

      Publisher: The Author
      Pub Date: 01/01/199?
      Call Number: 974.8 T664 PA

      On a related note, researchers interested in Ohio may look to the 1856 Annual Report of the Secretary of State, which included a similar census questionnaire. A copy of this is part of Clayton’s holdings, and can be found at:

       

      Annual report of the secretary of state to the governor of Ohio. Appendix B, return of the number of deaf and dumb, blind, insane, and idiotic persons, May, 1856 - Ohio. Secretary of State.

      Publisher: Heritage Books
      Pub Date: 01/01/1987
      Call Number: 977.1 A615 OHIO

      Unfortunately not all of the 1880 Federal Census DDD schedules have survived for us to research, but for those that have it is one more glimpse into the whole different world our ancestors lived in.

      Monthly classes and Other upcoming events...

      Classes are approximately 1 hour, unless otherwise noted.
       
      Because the Clayton Town Crier is published quarterly, please remember to consult Clayton’s Events webpage (http://www.houstonlibrary.org/clayton) or the Clayton Extra for items not submitted in time to be published in the current Crier.

      Library Orientation  
      Saturday, August 17th, 2013 10:30AM-11:45AM
      Saturday, September 21st, 2013 10:30AM-11:45AM
            Learn about the vast resources and how to efficiently utilize genealogical research materials housed at the Clayton Library Center for Genealogical Research.  No reservations needed, meet at the Information Desk in the library.  Adults/Teens.

      Saturday, July 27th, Clayton Library welcomes Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, Certified Genealogist, and CGL, Certified Genealogical Lecturer for DNA Day!  Register for any or all classes.

      GATA GACC! DNA and Genetic Genealogy Today
      Saturday, July 27th, 2013 10:30-12:00PM
            A general introduction to using DNA testing for genealogy and where we are today. It introduces Y-DNA for the direct paternal line, mitochondrial DNA for the direct maternal line, and autosomal DNA for the other ancestral lines. You will learn what DNA testing is and how to obtain the tests, how to use the test results to maximize the contribution to genealogical research goals, and which tests can be used for ethnic studies based on the current technology. Reservations required, please call 832-393-2600.  Adults/Teens.

      Going Nuclear: DNA Discoveries to Trace All Lines of Descent
      Saturday, July 27th, 2013 1:30-2:15PM
            Learn to link families using autosomal DNA test results from any testing company. Maximize impact on your genealogical research goals. Includes how to use test results such as those from 23andMe, AncestryDNA, and Family Tree DNA autosomal tests. Reservations required, please call 832-393-2600.  Adults/Teens.

      Paternal Lines: Using Y-DNA
      Saturday, July 27th, 2013 2:30-3:15PM
            Learn details of Y-DNA testing including how to analyze test results. Findings can corroborate your paper trail or place you on the right research path. Reservations required, please call 832-393-2600.  Adults/Teens.

      Maternal Lines: Using Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)
      Saturday, July 27th, 2013 3:30-4:15PM
            Understand mitochondrial DNA testing with an introduction to analysis of test results. Sample research problems demonstrate how mtDNA can be used by genealogists. Reservations required, please call 832-393-2600.  Adults/Teens.

      Other upcoming events…

      Clayton Library Friends General Meeting
      Saturday, August 10, 2013 10:15AM-12:00PM
            Meet Mr. Draper and the Reverend Shane  -- Trevia Wooster Beverly will speak at the August CLF General Meeting on two of Clayton’s Special Collections: the Draper Papers and the Shane Manuscript Collection.   Registration starts at 10:15AM in the Carriage House meeting room at Clayton Library and the meeting will begin at 10:30AM.

      Additional information about Clayton Library

      Hours of operation:
      Monday: Closed
      Tuesday: 10am - 6pm
      Wednesday: 10am - 8pm
      Thursday: 10am - 6pm

      Friday and Saturday: 10am - 5pm

       

      We are closed on City of Houston holidays. Click here for the holiday schedule. http://www.houstonlibrary.org/library-holidays

      If you need driving directions to Clayton from Houston's major freeways, click here.
      http://www2.houstonlibrary.org/clayton/about_directions.html

      For more information, visit the Clayton Library webpage. http://www.houstonlibrary.org/clayton

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