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Platycercus eximius x P. elegans

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  • Yoanna
    Hi,Are there hybrid Platycercus eximus and elegans? In nature or in breed?Best regards, Joanna---- Parrots on stamps, phonecards and banknotes,
    Message 1 of 14 , May 2, 2002
      Hi,

      Are there hybrid Platycercus eximus and elegans? In nature or in breed?

      Best regards,
      Joanna

      ----
      Parrots on stamps, phonecards and banknotes,
      http://parrot-stamps.emernet.pl



      --
      Encyklopedia multimedialna w prezencie!
      http://www.e-mail.onet.pl
    • Brian Nielsen
      You are reffering to the Adelaide rosella? Brian
      Message 2 of 14 , May 2, 2002
        You are reffering to the Adelaide rosella?

        Brian


        At 09:24 02-05-02 +0200, you wrote:
        >Hi,
        >
        >Are there hybrid Platycercus eximus and elegans? In nature or in breed?
        >
        >Best regards,
        >Joanna
        >
        >----
        >Parrots on stamps, phonecards and banknotes,
        >http://parrot-stamps.emernet.pl
        >
        >
        >
        >--
        >Encyklopedia multimedialna w prezencie!
        >http://www.e-mail.onet.pl
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      • Yoanna
        ... -- Tego nie znajdziesz w zadnym sklepie! [ http://oferty.onet.pl ]
        Message 3 of 14 , May 2, 2002
          > >Are there hybrid Platycercus eximus and elegans? In nature
          >>or in breed?
          > You are reffering to the Adelaide rosella?

          Is it a natural hybrid of Platycercus elegans and Platycercus flaveolus?
          I mean hybrid Platycercus eximus and elegans. It is posibble such hybrid
          do not exist: one visitor of my polish Discussion Forum (about parrot)
          ask such question.


          Best regards,
          Joanna

          ----
          Parrots on stamps, phonecards and banknotes,
          http://parrot-stamps.emernet.pl



          --

          Tego nie znajdziesz w zadnym sklepie!
          [ http://oferty.onet.pl ]
        • Terry Martin
          The Adelaide is variously referred to either as a subspecies of the Crimson Rosella (P. elegans) or a distinct species (P. adelaidae ??? something like that)
          Message 4 of 14 , May 2, 2002
            The Adelaide is variously referred to either as a subspecies of the
            Crimson Rosella (P. elegans) or a distinct species (P. adelaidae ???
            something like that)

            The Eastern Rosella (P. eximius) has been reported as hybridising
            with the Crimson in the wild, but I have my doubts as wild birds with the
            choice of mates normally choose their own species. And these two species
            have distinctly different habits and preferred habitat, although they do
            overlap. In captivity, it certainly has been recorded. I have seen very old
            books mis-identify young Crimsons as hybrids, because they are mostly green,
            not red.

            Terry
          • Brian Nielsen
            When the supply of wild caught Adelaide rosellas was cut of many years ago many breeders crossbred Crimson x Easter (elegans x eximius). I have seen such
            Message 5 of 14 , May 2, 2002
              When the supply of wild caught Adelaide rosellas was cut of many years ago
              many breeders crossbred Crimson x Easter (elegans x eximius). I have seen
              such hybrids not so many years ago and they are hard to tell from "true"
              Adelaides.

              My guess is that Adelaide have risen many many years ago when the two
              populations by some reason was "forced" to croosbreed.
              The later when the Adelaide was established the Crimson and the Easter was
              "re" introduced to the area and they would as you say not crossbreed if
              possible.

              Just as a notation i have seen a flock of pure Agapornis personata &
              Agapornis Fischeri crossbreeding even though they could choos a "true" partner.

              Brian




              At 18:49 02-05-02 +1000, you wrote:
              > The Adelaide is variously referred to either as a subspecies of the
              >Crimson Rosella (P. elegans) or a distinct species (P. adelaidae ???
              >something like that)
              >
              > The Eastern Rosella (P. eximius) has been reported as hybridising
              >with the Crimson in the wild, but I have my doubts as wild birds with the
              >choice of mates normally choose their own species. And these two species
              >have distinctly different habits and preferred habitat, although they do
              >overlap. In captivity, it certainly has been recorded. I have seen very old
              >books mis-identify young Crimsons as hybrids, because they are mostly green,
              >not red.
              >
              > Terry
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            • Thierry DULIERE
              The crossbred elegans x eximius produce curiously coloured birds, really different from the adelaidae. Many breeders produce such hybrids but thez arenot able
              Message 6 of 14 , May 2, 2002
                The crossbred elegans x eximius produce curiously coloured birds, really different from the adelaidae. Many breeders produce such hybrids but thez arenot able to be confused with adelaidae but crossebred elegans x flaveolus may be confused with adelaidae !
                 
                Best regards
                 
                Thierry
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Thursday, May 02, 2002 12:31 PM
                Subject: Re: [Genetics-Psittacine] Re: Platycercus eximius x P. elegans

                When the supply of wild caught Adelaide rosellas was cut of many years ago
                many breeders crossbred Crimson x Easter (elegans x eximius). I have seen
                such hybrids not so many years ago and they are hard to tell from "true"
                Adelaides.

                My guess is that Adelaide have risen many many years ago when the two
                populations by some reason was "forced" to croosbreed.
                The later when the Adelaide was established the Crimson and the Easter was
                "re" introduced to the area and they would as you say not crossbreed if
                possible.

                Just as a notation i have seen a flock of pure Agapornis personata &
                Agapornis Fischeri crossbreeding even though they could choos a "true" partner.

                Brian




                At 18:49 02-05-02 +1000, you wrote:
                >         The Adelaide is variously referred to either as a subspecies of the
                >Crimson Rosella (P. elegans) or a distinct species (P. adelaidae ???
                >something like that)
                >
                >         The Eastern Rosella (P. eximius) has been reported as hybridising
                >with the Crimson in the wild, but I have my doubts as wild birds with the
                >choice of mates normally choose their own species. And these two species
                >have distinctly different habits and preferred habitat, although they do
                >overlap. In captivity, it certainly has been recorded. I have seen very old
                >books mis-identify young Crimsons as hybrids, because they are mostly green,
                >not red.
                >
                >         Terry
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



                Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
              • Thierry DULIERE
                I forgot firstly to tell also that almost all the crossbred eximius x crimson proved to be unfertile ! http://thierry.duliere.free.fr/rosella/
                Message 7 of 14 , May 2, 2002
                  I forgot firstly to tell also that almost all the crossbred eximius x crimson proved to be unfertile !
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Friday, May 03, 2002 12:00 AM
                  Subject: Re: [Genetics-Psittacine] Re: Platycercus eximius x P. elegans

                  The crossbred elegans x eximius produce curiously coloured birds, really different from the adelaidae. Many breeders produce such hybrids but thez arenot able to be confused with adelaidae but crossebred elegans x flaveolus may be confused with adelaidae !
                   
                  Best regards
                   
                  Thierry
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Thursday, May 02, 2002 12:31 PM
                  Subject: Re: [Genetics-Psittacine] Re: Platycercus eximius x P. elegans

                  When the supply of wild caught Adelaide rosellas was cut of many years ago
                  many breeders crossbred Crimson x Easter (elegans x eximius). I have seen
                  such hybrids not so many years ago and they are hard to tell from "true"
                  Adelaides.

                  My guess is that Adelaide have risen many many years ago when the two
                  populations by some reason was "forced" to croosbreed.
                  The later when the Adelaide was established the Crimson and the Easter was
                  "re" introduced to the area and they would as you say not crossbreed if
                  possible.

                  Just as a notation i have seen a flock of pure Agapornis personata &
                  Agapornis Fischeri crossbreeding even though they could choos a "true" partner.

                  Brian




                  At 18:49 02-05-02 +1000, you wrote:
                  >         The Adelaide is variously referred to either as a subspecies of the
                  >Crimson Rosella (P. elegans) or a distinct species (P. adelaidae ???
                  >something like that)
                  >
                  >         The Eastern Rosella (P. eximius) has been reported as hybridising
                  >with the Crimson in the wild, but I have my doubts as wild birds with the
                  >choice of mates normally choose their own species. And these two species
                  >have distinctly different habits and preferred habitat, although they do
                  >overlap. In captivity, it certainly has been recorded. I have seen very old
                  >books mis-identify young Crimsons as hybrids, because they are mostly green,
                  >not red.
                  >
                  >         Terry
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



                  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


                  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                • CliveHesford@cs.com
                  It goes without saying that deliberate hybridisation has no place in aviculture except in the unlikely event of assisting properly organised scientific
                  Message 8 of 14 , May 3, 2002

                    It goes without saying that deliberate hybridisation has no place in aviculture except in the unlikely event of assisting properly organised scientific research.

                    Only recently did I come to learn how widespread this practice appears to be in the case of the Macaws. So much so that there is a long list of fancy names for the different hybrids and even hybrids of hybrids. And I wonder how much of scientific interest has been learned from this undesirable practice?

                    Clive.


                    Clive Hesford,
                    Cheltenham, UK

                    CliveHesford@...

                    ClliveHesford@...

                    http://www.parrotgenetics.info

                    http://www.birdhobbyist.com/parrotcolour/
                  • Terry Martin
                    Thierry said ... different from the adelaidae. Many breeders produce such hybrids but thez arenot able to be confused with adelaidae but crossebred elegans x
                    Message 9 of 14 , May 3, 2002
                      Thierry said


                      >The crossbred elegans x eximius produce curiously coloured birds, really
                      different from the adelaidae. Many breeders produce such hybrids but thez
                      arenot able to be confused with adelaidae but crossebred elegans x flaveolus
                      may be confused with adelaidae !<


                      I agree. There is a theory amongst ornithologists that the Adelaide
                      was a natural hybrid between the Crimson and the Yellow Rosellas. Those
                      people also view all three as subspecies of one another. There has never
                      been suggestion the Eastern was involved in the origin of the Adelaide
                      Rosella.

                      Terry
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