Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Expand Messages
  • karamat hussain
    ... Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail Personal Address - Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail.
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 1, 2001
    • 0 Attachment



      Do You Yahoo!?
      Yahoo! Mail Personal Address - Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail.
    • Clive Hesford
      Message text written by INTERNET:Genetics-Psittacine@yahoogroups.com ... Ken, The number of chromosomes in the budgerigar is 60. This was already found out in
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 1, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        Message text written by INTERNET:Genetics-Psittacine@yahoogroups.com

        >>>Does anyone know of the latest info on the number of chromosomes that
        >a budgerigar has. Some early published works said 13 and I believe
        >this was revised years later to about 60 (I think). Anybody know the
        >correct number?
        >
        >And how does this number compare with other parrot species? and which
        >chromosomes are reasonably "identical" between species?

        Ken,


        The number of chromosomes in the budgerigar is 60. This was already found
        out in 1959. Most Budgerigar reference books are wrong about this subject.
        The difference with other parrot species is smal. I shall have to find out
        in my database for some accurate figures.

        I am not sure what you meant with "identical". Do you mean the genes or the
        chromosomes.

        Inte
        MUTAVI<<


        This is one of a number of fundamental questions I'm presently attempting
        to address at:

        http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clivehesford/questions.html

        I point out that it's necessary to distinguish between the haploid number
        and the diploid number when assessing quoted figures. The first is the
        number of 'different' chromosomes (one set as in the gametes) and the other
        is the 'total number' of chromosomes in body cells (two sets).

        It is difficult to count bird chromosomes because some are extremely small
        (microchromosomes) and the only quotable figure I've found is that of
        Taylor and Warner which is 31 pairs (haploid number). This suggests that
        Inte's figure of 60 is the diploid number quoted by some other source.

        These figures are for the budgerigar, but I would speculate that all
        parrots share the same basic configuration of chromosomes although the
        numbers might well vary slightly in different lineages (genera/species) due
        to divisions, deletions, duplications, inversions, etc.

        I'd be grateful to hear from anyone who can point to or quote more detailed
        information on this or any of the other subjects on the above webpage.

        Clive.


        Clive Hesford,
        Cheltenham, UK.

        Mail: CliveHesford@...
        Internet: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clivehesford/
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.