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RE: [Genetics-Psittacine] turquoise parrotlets

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  • Dilson
    Turquoise alone is recessive; You need two turquoise parents (one may be a carrier) to get a baby turquoise. But, since Turquoise do not have its own locus
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 8, 2013
      Turquoise alone is recessive; You need two turquoise parents (one may be a
      carrier) to get a baby turquoise.

      But, since Turquoise do not have its own locus (place), it uses the locus of
      the Blue. Thus, when Blue is present with Turquoise, both mutations have to
      share the same locus, and the Turquoise can be considered as co-dominant
      with blue: One allele Turquoise and one allele Blue.
      In your specific case, pairing a Turquoise and a Blue parrotlet you will get
      Turquoise-and-Blue parrotlets, referred to as TurquoiseBlue.

      The possible allele combinations are:

      -Green and Turquoise: a green parrotlet, split to turquoise.
      -Turquoise and turquoise: a homozygous Turquoise parrotlet.
      -Turquoise and blue: a heterozygous TurquoiseBlue parrotlet (written with
      both names together, to indicate co-dominance).


      Pairings:

      1- Pairing a Turquoise to a Turquoise:
      100% Turquoise babies.

      2- Pairing a Green to a Turquoise:
      100% Green/Turquoise.

      3- Pairing a Green to a TurquoiseBlue:
      50% Green/Blue,
      50% Green/Turquoise.

      4- Pairing a Green to a Green/Turquoise
      50% Green
      50% Green/Turquoise

      5- Pairing a Green/Turquoise to a Green/Turquoise:
      50% Green/Turquoise babies,
      25% Green,
      25% Turquoise.

      6- Pairing a Green/Turquoise to a TurquoiseBlue:
      25% Turquoise,
      25% TurquoiseBlue,
      25% Green/Blue,
      25% Green/Turquoise.

      7- Pairing a green/turquoise with a blue:
      50% TurquoiseBlue,
      50% green/blue.

      8- Pairing a Green/Turquoise to a Turquoise
      50% Green/Turquoise,
      50% Turquoise

      9- Pairing a Turquoise to a Blue:
      100% TurquoiseBlue.

      10- Pairing a TurquoiseBlue to a TurquoiseBlue:
      50% TurquoiseBlue,
      25% Turquoise,
      25% Blue.

      11- Pairing a Turquoise to a TurquoiseBlue:
      50% Turquoise,
      50% TurquoiseBlue.


      Pairings 3, 4, 5, and 6 should be avoided as it will be impossible to
      identify the genetics of the green baby birds without test-mating them.

      The Turquoise mutation may be combined with any other mutations. Example:
      American Yellow Turquoise
      American White Turquoise
      Fallow TurquoiseBlue
      Pied Turquoise, and etc.

      As an exception, the Lutino Turquoise is visually pure Lutino; Turquoise
      will be hidden, even though it is there and it is transmissible to the
      descendants.





      -----Original Message-----
      From: Genetics-Psittacine@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:Genetics-Psittacine@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of me
      Sent: Thursday, March 07, 2013 5:57 PM
      To: Genetics-Psittacine@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Genetics-Psittacine] turquoise parrotlets

      Can anyone tell me if turquoise is dominant or recessive in parrotlets? If I
      pair a turquoise to blue bird, will any of their offspring be turquoise?



      ------------------------------------

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    • Dilson
      No problem, man. I learned all this here; this site is a life-saver. Dilson Miami/FL/USA From: Erin Craig [mailto:erincam24@yahoo.com] Sent: Friday, March 08,
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 8, 2013

        No problem, man.

         

        I learned all this here; this site is a life-saver.

         

        Dilson

        Miami/FL/USA

         

        From: Erin Craig [mailto:erincam24@...]
        Sent: Friday, March 08, 2013 8:10 AM
        To: dilson@...
        Subject: RE: [Genetics-Psittacine] turquoise parrotlets

         

        Awersome! Thank you so much. That's the best explanation on turquoise parrotlets ever. I searched high and low, and tried to figure it out myself on gencalc, but the mutation is so new, I couldn't find any info. Thanks again.

         

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