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Re: [Genetics-Psittacine] Nanday Mutations

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  • Hector Raigosa
    Good to hear, not so much here in teh United States, I m going to put to the test this Sunday as I ll be attending one of the Country s bigest bird show/mart
    Message 1 of 35 , Mar 1, 2010
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      Good to hear, not so much here in teh United States, I'm going to put to the test this Sunday as I'll be attending one of the Country's bigest bird show/mart on my bird breder friends
      On another note: I bought this Red Rump over the weekend along with others, can't quite make out mutation... My Pallidinos looks different than this one, and yet i'm sure it has Pallid in him. Maybe Lutino too as there are quite a few bright yellow feathers. Has lots of light gray on back, flights, vest area etc.,
      Could be just an off color Pallidino? It also has red eyes-not caused by camera flash

      --- On Sun, 2/28/10, XP 2600 <XP2600@...> wrote:

      From: XP 2600 <XP2600@...>
      Subject: Re: [Genetics-Psittacine] Nanday Mutations
      To: Genetics-Psittacine@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Sunday, February 28, 2010, 11:00 PM

       
      Hello Mr Hector Raigosa
      Actually the standard names started to be used globally, i am an Egyptian breeder and within last years people here used to use it, its just need to some patient and help from the breeders.

      Imam

      On Sat, Feb 27, 2010 at 4:11 AM, Hector Raigosa <fatcat_tom@sbcgloba l.net> wrote:
       
      Thank you Theirry and Monica for bringing me up to speed. I would hope that one day color / mutation names will be the same regardless country and or continent and has been discussed in past email.

      --- On Fri, 2/26/10, Thierry DULIERE <ThierryDULIERE@ wanadoo.fr> wrote:

      From: Thierry DULIERE <ThierryDULIERE@ wanadoo.fr>

      Subject: Re: [Genetics-Psittacin e] Nanday Mutations
      Date: Friday, February 26, 2010, 3:33 PM

       
      
      A "BLUE" mutation remove all psittacine pigment (yellow and red).
      This definition classify the WHITE-FACE mutation in cockatiel as a BLUE.
      In fact the BLUE is a colour coming from a GREEN BIRD (GREEN - YELLOW = BLUE).
      But as the WILD COULOURED COCKATIEL is not green but grey, they are no visual blue.... But a "GENETIC" blue !
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Friday, February 26, 2010 10:41 PM
      Subject: RE: [Genetics-Psittacin e] Nanday Mutations

       
      Cream is also used for Bourkes, Red Rumps, and some finches, I however never herd of a whiteface Tiel refered to as blue, as I correct to assume the proper name is Blue for a white face? or is that just a figure of speak.

      --- On Fri, 2/26/10, Monica M.C. <mnmc88@hotmail. com> wrote:

      From: Monica M.C. <mnmc88@hotmail. com>
      Subject: RE: [Genetics-Psittacin e] Nanday Mutations

      To: genetics-psittacine @yahoogroups. com
      Date: Friday, February 26, 2010, 12:42 PM

       
      Alright, you got me there! I don't commonly use the "cream" names, which I've only seen used most frequently in lovebird mutations, but not in other species. I have heard of the "cream" names used in budgies, albiet infrequently.

      Of the mutations in Green Cheeks that I am aware of, we have...
       
      Cinnamon (misnamed previously as fallow)
      Dilute
      Opaline (aka yellowside)
      Turquoise
      Pied (I assume this is a confirmed mutation, but rarely spoken about)
       
      And of course, all the mixed mutations.
       
       
      Speaking of blue, I wonder if there ever will be a true blue peachface lovebird mutation.
       
       
      Monica


       

      To: Genetics-Psittacine @yahoogroups. com
      From: tintin_montreal1972 @yahoo.com
      Date: Fri, 26 Feb 2010 09:13:57 -0800
      Subject: RE: [Genetics-Psittacin e] Nanday Mutations

       
      As far as I'm aware, the blue mutation in green cheeks is par-blue, so a "yellow-sided blue" could, technically, be correct. The correct name of course, would be a turquoise opaline.
       
      Hey again Monica & Every Birdie,
      as I said in a previous post I'm not so up-to-date on Conure species' colour mutations and Terry's book was published in 2002. Back then there was only 3 mutation identified in the green-cheeked Conure namely Cinnamon (then erraneously called "Fallow" back then), Opaline (commonly known as "Yellowsided" ) & Turquoise (then erraneously called "Blue")
       
      When I replied, I kept in mind that it was possible for the genuine Blue to have been produced somehwere since Terry's book was published. Hence my suggestion to name the combination of the genuine Blue & Opaline (Yellowsided) commonly "Whitesided Blue or White Sided"
       
      An Opaline Turquoise green-cheeked Conure would be best commonly called "Creamsided Turquoise" or "Cream Sided" in our naming system. Just as Turquoise Ino is commonly called Cream-Ino & Turquoise Clear (i.e. Darkeyedclear &/or Blackeyedclear) is commonly called "Cream".
       
      Best regards,
      Stéphane
      (MALE's name french equivalent of Stephen ;-) aka Tintin,
      Ruby Eyes Aviary.

      "You remain responsible, forever, for what you have tamed."
      - Antoine De Saint-Exupéry
       
       


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      --
      Imam
      MCSA MCSE
    • Hector Raigosa
      I have no idea what happened to its beak, a par blue hen also has same type of beak. I ve read that it could be caused by Diet as a chick, liver...? but who
      Message 35 of 35 , Mar 2, 2010
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        I have no idea what happened to its beak, a par blue hen also has same type of beak. I've read that it could be caused by Diet as a chick, liver...? but who knows. I was going to trim it; but won't as I remember years ago having same problem with Tiels bought from another breeder and never solved it, just got worst.

        --- On Mon, 3/1/10, kenny Stephens <kenrayngbc@...> wrote:

        From: kenny Stephens <kenrayngbc@...>
        Subject: Re: [Genetics-Psittacine] Nanday Mutations _ Red Rump
        To: Genetics-Psittacine@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, March 1, 2010, 11:40 PM

         
        Hi Hector, looks like a cinnamon or pallid-ino to me too, but what's up with that beak?   I'd have to call him "Fang"
        :)
         
        Kenny

         


        From: Hector Raigosa <fatcat_tom@sbcgloba l.net>
        To: Genetics-Psittacine @yahoogroups. com
        Sent: Tue, March 2, 2010 12:35:22 AM
        Subject: Re: [Genetics-Psittacin e] Nanday Mutations

         
        Good to hear, not so much here in teh United States, I'm going to put to the test this Sunday as I'll be attending one of the Country's bigest bird show/mart on my bird breder friends
        On another note: I bought this Red Rump over the weekend along with others, can't quite make out mutation... My Pallidinos looks different than this one, and yet i'm sure it has Pallid in him. Maybe Lutino too as there are quite a few bright yellow feathers. Has lots of light gray on back, flights, vest area etc.,
        Could be just an off color Pallidino? It also has red eyes-not caused by camera flash

        --- On Sun, 2/28/10, XP 2600 <XP2600@gmail. com> wrote:

        From: XP 2600 <XP2600@gmail. com>
        Subject: Re: [Genetics-Psittacin e] Nanday Mutations
        To: Genetics-Psittacine @yahoogroups. com
        Date: Sunday, February 28, 2010, 11:00 PM

         
        Hello Mr Hector Raigosa
        Actually the standard names started to be used globally, i am an Egyptian breeder and within last years people here used to use it, its just need to some patient and help from the breeders.

        Imam

        On Sat, Feb 27, 2010 at 4:11 AM, Hector Raigosa <fatcat_tom@sbcgloba l.net> wrote:
         
        Thank you Theirry and Monica for bringing me up to speed. I would hope that one day color / mutation names will be the same regardless country and or continent and has been discussed in past email.

        --- On Fri, 2/26/10, Thierry DULIERE <ThierryDULIERE@ wanadoo.fr> wrote:

        From: Thierry DULIERE <ThierryDULIERE@ wanadoo.fr>

        Subject: Re: [Genetics-Psittacin e] Nanday Mutations
        Date: Friday, February 26, 2010, 3:33 PM

         
        
        A "BLUE" mutation remove all psittacine pigment (yellow and red).
        This definition classify the WHITE-FACE mutation in cockatiel as a BLUE.
        In fact the BLUE is a colour coming from a GREEN BIRD (GREEN - YELLOW = BLUE).
        But as the WILD COULOURED COCKATIEL is not green but grey, they are no visual blue.... But a "GENETIC" blue !
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Friday, February 26, 2010 10:41 PM
        Subject: RE: [Genetics-Psittacin e] Nanday Mutations

         
        Cream is also used for Bourkes, Red Rumps, and some finches, I however never herd of a whiteface Tiel refered to as blue, as I correct to assume the proper name is Blue for a white face? or is that just a figure of speak.

        --- On Fri, 2/26/10, Monica M.C. <mnmc88@hotmail. com> wrote:

        From: Monica M.C. <mnmc88@hotmail. com>
        Subject: RE: [Genetics-Psittacin e] Nanday Mutations

        To: genetics-psittacine @yahoogroups. com
        Date: Friday, February 26, 2010, 12:42 PM

         
        Alright, you got me there! I don't commonly use the "cream" names, which I've only seen used most frequently in lovebird mutations, but not in other species. I have heard of the "cream" names used in budgies, albiet infrequently.

        Of the mutations in Green Cheeks that I am aware of, we have...
         
        Cinnamon (misnamed previously as fallow)
        Dilute
        Opaline (aka yellowside)
        Turquoise
        Pied (I assume this is a confirmed mutation, but rarely spoken about)
         
        And of course, all the mixed mutations.
         
         
        Speaking of blue, I wonder if there ever will be a true blue peachface lovebird mutation.
         
         
        Monica


         

        To: Genetics-Psittacine @yahoogroups. com
        From: tintin_montreal1972 @yahoo.com
        Date: Fri, 26 Feb 2010 09:13:57 -0800
        Subject: RE: [Genetics-Psittacin e] Nanday Mutations

         
        As far as I'm aware, the blue mutation in green cheeks is par-blue, so a "yellow-sided blue" could, technically, be correct. The correct name of course, would be a turquoise opaline.
         
        Hey again Monica & Every Birdie,
        as I said in a previous post I'm not so up-to-date on Conure species' colour mutations and Terry's book was published in 2002. Back then there was only 3 mutation identified in the green-cheeked Conure namely Cinnamon (then erraneously called "Fallow" back then), Opaline (commonly known as "Yellowsided" ) & Turquoise (then erraneously called "Blue")
         
        When I replied, I kept in mind that it was possible for the genuine Blue to have been produced somehwere since Terry's book was published. Hence my suggestion to name the combination of the genuine Blue & Opaline (Yellowsided) commonly "Whitesided Blue or White Sided"
         
        An Opaline Turquoise green-cheeked Conure would be best commonly called "Creamsided Turquoise" or "Cream Sided" in our naming system. Just as Turquoise Ino is commonly called Cream-Ino & Turquoise Clear (i.e. Darkeyedclear &/or Blackeyedclear) is commonly called "Cream".
         
        Best regards,
        Stéphane
        (MALE's name french equivalent of Stephen ;-) aka Tintin,
        Ruby Eyes Aviary.

        "You remain responsible, forever, for what you have tamed."
        - Antoine De Saint-Exupéry
         
         


        Offrez un compte Flickr Pro à vos amis et à votre famille. Allez-y!



        Your E-mail and More On-the-Go. Get Windows Live Hotmail Free. Sign up now.



        --
        Imam
        MCSA MCSE

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