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Re: [Genetics-Psittacine] Lutinopallid masking violet

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  • Mick Blake [Exotic Parrots & Karmic Aviar
    Yes Pallidino that is what we now call a yellow limes and yellow lime is the name that was used for over twenty years. Mick Mick & Karin Blake Owners &
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 1, 2007
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      Yes Pallidino that is what we now call a yellow limes and yellow lime is the name that was used for over twenty years.
       
      Mick
       
      Mick & Karin Blake
      Owners & Managers of
      Karmic Aviaries,
      Avicultural Consultant
      38 years breeding Mutations,
      One Stack Pottery & Basilisk Gallery
      Mt Morgan Queensland
      Australia.
      www.karmicaviaries.com
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2007 1:24 PM
      Subject: RE: [Genetics-Psittacine] Lutinopallid masking violet

      pallidino


      From: Genetics-Psittacine @yahoogroups. com [mailto: Genetics-Psittacine @yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of Mick Blake [Exotic Parrots & Karmic Aviaries]
      Sent: Wednesday, 31 October 2007 4:52 PM
      To: Genetics-Psittacine @yahoogroups. com
      Subject: Re: [Genetics-Psittacin e] Lutinopallid masking violet

      Yellow lime

      ---- Original Message -----

      From: marj nakar

      Sent: Wednesday, October 31, 2007 11:05 AM

      Subject: Re: [Genetics-Psittacin e] Lutinopallid masking violet

      hi can we  have a more  common name for a  LUTINO PALLID  thanks

      mallee_1 <malleeaviaries@ hotmail.com> wrote:

      The question I have could lutinopallid birds mask violet factor?

      Cheers

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    • Wessel van der Veen
      Hi Mick: Yellow lime indeed was used for both a SL and a NSL melanin reducing mutation, but almost exclusively in Australia. Attemps to introduce lime have
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 1, 2007
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        Hi Mick:

        Yellow lime indeed was used for both a SL and a NSL
        melanin reducing mutation, but almost exclusively in Australia.
        Attemps to introduce lime have failed, even in the UK

        The first one (a NSL par-ino) has been called pastel in continental
        Europe since 1973 (publication of the first Lovebird standard by
        the N.B.v.V.); the second one used to be called Australian cinnamon
        (in lovebirds) but has been changed to pallid several years ago.

        And PallidIno is today's description to describe a phenotype
        caused by the two alleles of SL ino, i.e. pallid and ino.
        Note that the two alleles are capitalised and written as one word.

        Likewise PastelIno, PastelDec and DecIno for the NSL
        par-inos in eyerings (individually pastel, dark eyed clear and NSL ino
        and AquaTurquoise, AquaBlue, TurquoiseBlue for the par-blues
        aqua and turquoise in other species.

        Regards,
        Wessel van der Veen.
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