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More Kakariki questions

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  • Greg Holmes
    Hi Terry and others, I am hoping (now that we have more information) that perhaps some-one can put a name to this particular mutation. Keep in mind these are
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 1, 2006
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      Hi Terry and others,

      I am hoping (now that we have more information) that perhaps some-one can
      put a name to this particular mutation. Keep in mind these are Australian
      Kakariki and I have never seen this before. The birds in question are the
      ones we have sent in pictures of before. I have this time included a close
      up of the head and in particular eye area. You will notice that the skin
      colour around the eye is very light whereas the normal cinnamon has a much
      darker colour in this area. The iris is also a very bright red (this is much
      darker in the cinnamon) and in the sunlight the rest of the eye appears to
      be a plum colour and not the black of the cinnamon bird. We have also bred
      B.E.C. birds that have a plum coloured eye of similar colour.
      The other area that is different is in the skin colour of the feet and toes.
      This is a consistent colour similar to the colour around the eye and not as
      dark as the cinnamon. We have 2 young birds inside that are being hand
      raised and at 6 weeks of age they defianately have plum coloured eyes. At
      this same stage the cinnamons we have hand raised would have dark eyes so
      there is a definite difference.
      The question is what could this mutation be. It is not the same as the
      cinnamon mutation in the areas I have highlighted but does carry a similar
      overall colour. Could this be a form of dilute or is it a form of red eyed
      cinnamon. The full coloured yellows (BEC) maintains the plum eyed colour but
      this is not as distinct as the red eye found in the mutation the Europeans
      call Lutino.
      Some of our breeding BEC's do have lighter coloured areas of green in their
      feathering. We naturally assumed this was cinnamon but have since worked out
      it is this mutation. The puzzle becomes even more involved when you consider
      that a Normal/BEC cock bird (shows no sign of this mutation) mated to a BEC
      hen (that has the lighter feather colouring ) produces only cocks birds in
      this mutation. We have paired one of these cock birds back to a BEC hen that
      also displays the lighter feathering and have now produced cocks and hens.
      When 2 birds of this mutation are paired we produce both cocks and hens in
      the mutation and also the BEC. Any ideas.

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