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RE: [Genetics-Psittacine] Sex-linkage males?

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  • Carie Nixon
    Opaline is extremely variable. Some of them show green and yellow and blue in varying amounts. Some people are even selecting for these birds, and call them
    Message 1 of 20 , Jun 1, 2004
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      RE: [Genetics-Psittacine] Sex-linkage males?
      Opaline is extremely variable.  Some of them show green and yellow and blue in varying amounts.  Some people are even selecting for these birds, and call them "rainbow".  It is still an opaline but with other genes (modifyers) affecting the appearance.  Other people select away from this, prefering the deep salmon colored birds.  Carie Nixon

      Rainer,
      They are Bourkes Parakeets.  The hen is an Opaline, I know nothing about
      her background.  The cock, to me, looks like an Opaline. Clean with no colors
      besides the rose and black.  He was bought as a 'Spangle', with Fallow in
      the lines, but I don't know if he is split, but he's not what I expected a Spangle
      to look like.The pink on dad is a peachy color of pink. (he's beautiful)
      The first clutch of babies were 2 males.  They both have a lot of color to them,
      ie...yellow, green, blue, pink and beige on the wings.  They have a cream color
      on the head, neck and upper chest, this is not grey.  Pink on the back.  Light
      brown on the flights and tail.  At this point I thought that I had, what I call a dirty
      Opaline, but then they have red eyes. I thought that they must be FallowOpalines.
      But I've never had a FallowOpaline with any color other than pink and beige.
      ??????
      Second clutch is 2 hens.  Both of them are 'clean' Opalines. They are both a
      peachy color of pink with a pastel yellow across the back and wings.  Their
      flights are a darker beige than their brothers but not black like their dad.
      They are on their third clutch of eggs right now.  I am just wondering if there is
      something unusual with them.
      I have raised mutation Bourkes for 13 years and the females don't seem to be
      that unusual to me, but the males are.
      Deb

      rainer erhart <rainererhart@...> wrote:
      Deb, your email is a little confusing.  First one would like to know what type of parrot you are talking about.  Next, give a complete description of the parents, and lastly describe the young.  Rainer.
      >From: Deb Hart <heartflight2000@...>
      >Reply-To: Genetics-Psittacine@yahoogroups.com
      >To: Genetics-Psittacine@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: [Genetics-Psittacine] Sex-linkage males?
      >Date: Sat, 29 May 2004 16:29:11 -0700 (PDT)
      >
      >
      >Can anyone tell me if there is a 'sex-linked' version that the males inherit
      >
      >from dad, but NOT the daughters?   I have a pair that gave me something
      >
      >a little unusual, but it is visual males with non-visual hens. I'm a little
      >
      >curious what could be going on.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >Deb
      >Heartflight2000@...
      >
      >"Failure is not falling down. It is not getting up again."
      >Mary Pickford
      >
      >
      >---------------------------------
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    • Deb Hart
      Terry, Well, I just think that stinks. Could it be that if we went back to the previous generation that that may be where the poor -ly colored are? Do you
      Message 2 of 20 , Jun 1, 2004
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        Terry,
        Well, I just think that stinks.
        Could it be that if we went back to the previous generation that that
        may be where the 'poor'-ly colored are?
        Do you think that it could work the opposite also?  ie....'poor' colored
        parents producing 'good' colored young.
        Deb


        Terry Martin <sbankvet@...> wrote:
        Deb
         
        >        If the parents were both 'dirty' Opalines, I could understand
        >the other colors.  But both are (what I call) 'clean' Opalines.
        >Does the Opaline gene, sometimes produce 'dirty' (is there
        >a better way of saying this?) even when out of 2 'clean'?
         
                That certainly does happen. The genetic inheritance controlling the variations in Opaline have not been worked out. But you certainly can produce 'poor' opalines from good opalines. I have a pair of very 'good' Opalines (the hen is as clean and pink as the cock and he is very good) yet a large percentage of their young are poorly coloured.
         
                Terry


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      • Deb Hart
        Carie, I guess I ve been lucky then, as all of my previous FallowOpalines have had good coloring. I ve just assumed that all would. I guess these must be
        Message 3 of 20 , Jun 1, 2004
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          Carie,

          I guess I've been lucky then,  as all of my previous FallowOpalines have had

          'good' coloring. I've just assumed that all would.  I guess these must be

          'Rainbow' FallowOpalines <G>.

          Just one other question,  These males are so pale in color compared to others,

          should they get darker after they've completed their moult? (they are starting their

          first moult)

          Deb


          Carie Nixon <cnixon@...> wrote:

          Opaline is extremely variable.  Some of them show green and yellow and blue in varying amounts.  Some people are even selecting for these birds, and call them "rainbow".  It is still an opaline but with other genes (modifyers) affecting the appearance.  Other people select away from this, prefering the deep salmon colored birds.  Carie Nixon


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        • Carie Nixon
          I have not produced any FallowOplalines yet (I just got my first pair that should produce them), but the babies I saw at the breeders where I got my new birds
          Message 4 of 20 , Jun 1, 2004
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            RE: [Genetics-Psittacine] Sex-linkage males?
            I have not produced any FallowOplalines yet (I just got my first pair that should produce them), but the babies I saw at the breeders where I got my new birds were very light. I did not see any of the older birds that were as light as the very young ones.  I hope that helps.

            Carie


            Carie,
            I guess I've been lucky then,  as all of my previous FallowOpalines have had
            'good' coloring. I've just assumed that all would.  I guess these must be
            'Rainbow' FallowOpalines <G>.
            Just one other question,  These males are so pale in color compared to others,
            should they get darker after they've completed their moult? (they are starting their
            first moult)
            Deb

            Carie Nixon <cnixon@...> wrote:
            Opaline is extremely variable.  Some of them show green and yellow and blue in varying amounts.  Some people are even selecting for these birds, and call them "rainbow".  It is still an opaline but with other genes (modifyers) affecting the appearance.  Other people select away from this, prefering the deep salmon colored birds.  Carie Nixon
                           

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          • Deb Hart
            Thanks Carie, I guess I m just unsure as I have bred lots of FallowOpalines, both Dun FallowOpalines and Bronze FallowOpalines, but these just look so much
            Message 5 of 20 , Jun 1, 2004
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              Thanks Carie,

              I guess I'm just unsure as I have bred lots of FallowOpalines, both Dun FallowOpalines and Bronze FallowOpalines, but these just look so much different than anything I've produced before.

              Deb

               

               

              Carie Nixon <cnixon@...> wrote:

              I have not produced any FallowOplalines yet (I just got my first pair that should produce them), but the babies I saw at the breeders where I got my new birds were very light. I did not see any of the older birds that were as light as the very young ones.  I hope that helps.

              Carie


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            • Terry Martin
              Deb ... The topic needs extensive study to fully document. I have had normal/opaline cocks that threw good coloured young, but I found as soon as I introduced
              Message 6 of 20 , Jun 2, 2004
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                Deb
                 
                >Well, I just think that stinks.
                >Could it be that if we went back to the previous generation that that
                >may be where the 'poor'-ly colored are?
                >Do you think that it could work the opposite also?  ie....'poor'
                colored
                >parents producing 'good' colored young.
                 
                        The topic needs extensive study to fully document. I have had normal/opaline cocks that threw good coloured young, but I found as soon as I introduced an average coloured hen, the poor colour keeps turning up.
                 
                        Superficially, it seems the poor colour is recessive, hence the dominant 'good' coloured birds can carry 'poor' colour genes. But clearly it is more complex with probably half a dozen minor genes involved. Of course variable expression may also be playing a role as well.
                 
                        Terry
              • Deb Hart
                Thanks Terry, If I had more pairs, I might would be interested in trying. I guess I need to start being a little more critical in my decissions of who to keep
                Message 7 of 20 , Jun 2, 2004
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                  Thanks Terry,  
                  If I had more pairs, I might would be interested in trying.
                  I guess I need to start being a little more critical in my decissions of who to keep
                  back for future breedings. Maybe also going checking the family tree.
                  Thanks Deb
                   
                   
                       The topic needs extensive study to fully document. I have had normal/opaline cocks that threw good coloured young, but I found as soon as I introduced an average coloured hen, the poor colour keeps turning up.
                   
                          Superficially, it seems the poor colour is recessive, hence the dominant 'good' coloured birds can carry 'poor' colour genes. But clearly it is more complex with probably half a dozen minor genes involved. Of course variable _expression may also be playing a role as well.
                   
                          Terry


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