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Re: The 'Curious' Case of Happy Sindane

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  • multiracialbookclub
    Agreed! My favorite part of your posting is when you stated: I think it is unneccessary to have a DNA test just to prove this boy s is not white . Lol ...
    Message 1 of 15 , Aug 2, 2005
      Agreed!

      My favorite part of your
      posting is when you stated:

      "I think it is unneccessary to have a DNA
      test just to prove this boy's is not white".

      Lol ... that was great ... and so very true!

      In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
      john <reddgold_32@y...> wrote:

      Happy doesn't look white.
      He looks more mixed race.

      He even has light brown tanned like skin.
      Now his hair is slick straight and black.
      It is not curly and blonde like before.

      In south africa,If you have lightbrown skin
      and wavy hair,you might be called white

      lol.

      I think it is unneccessary to have a DNA
      test just to prove this boy's is not white.

      multiracialbookclub <soaptalk@...> wrote:

      Listed below are some articles on the
      `curious case' of a young `coloured' man from
      South Africa by the name of `Happy Sindane'

      The one article that I found to be of particular
      interest was found at the following link:

      http://forum.mg.co.za/showthreaded.php?Number=80694

      ****************************************************
      THE CURIOUS CASE OF HAPPY SINDANE
      ****************************************************

      The Controversy:

      http://reti.blogspot.com/2004/02/black-or-white.html

      The Ruling:

      http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/918541/posts
      http://www.buzzle.com/editorials/text7-16-2003-42983.asp
      http://www.buzzle.com/editorials/text6-21-2003-41993.asp

      (DNA tests on him and scores of putative
      parents showed him to be a so-called
      coloured (person of mixed race) …

      In October, magistrate Marthinus Kruger,
      in Bronkhorstspruit, a rural town 75 miles
      north-east of Johannesburg, said police evidence
      suggested the youth was the son of a German
      by his black domestic worker, Rina Mzayiya.
      He had been abandoned at the age of six …
      and brought up by another black woman … …

      The youth, who is olive skinned, became convinced
      he was an abducted white boy when he saw the
      photo of a missing white infant on television.)

      http://www.sundaytimes.co.za/2003/07/20/news/news11.asp
      http://forum.mg.co.za/showthreaded.php?Number=80694

      Related Links of Interest:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/71
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/70

      The Testing:
      http://www.thestar.co.za/index.php?fSectionId=129&fArticleId=153314
      http://thescotsman.scotsman.com/s2.cfm?id=592152003

      The Claims:
      http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/3047923.stm

      The Media Exploitation:
      http://www.witness.co.za/content/2003_06/16124.htm
      http://wap.busrep.co.za/index.php?fSectionId=129&fArticleId=188243

      ******************************************
      (Note: Article was originally provided
      on another web site by `John Reddgold')
      ******************************************

      'Lost Boy' Shines Light on Race in South Africa"

      (June 19, 2003 / By Lydia Polgreen
      Bronkhorstpruit, South Africa, June 17) –

      Happy Sindane was always an oddity
      in Tweefontein township.

      In a country where, almost a decade after the end of
      apartheid, the races seldom live side by side, Happy's
      blond head bobbed in a sea of tight black curls.

      In soccer games, played on dusty fields by barefoot
      boys with a homemade ball of plastic bags
      and twine, his pale feet stood out.

      Then, last month, Happy walked into a police
      station in this sleepy town about 60 miles
      northeast of Johannesburg.

      Speaking in Ndebele, his only tongue, Happy,
      now a teenager, told an officer that he was white
      and had been kidnapped from his Afrikaner parents
      by a family maid when he was a little boy
      The woman had taken him to a black township,
      he said, where he was virtually enslaved
      by the black family that raised him.

      Overnight, Happy was transformed from
      a local curiosity into a national sensation

      The Bronkhorstspruit police station was flooded
      with callers claiming to be Happy's parents.

      Jan and Sarie Botha, a poor white couple from Pretoria,
      emerged as the most credible of the white claimants

      But no sooner had they stepped forward than Tozi Ben,
      a Xhosa woman, announced that Happy was actually
      of mixed race, or colored as they say here,
      the issue of a romance between her cousin
      and a white Zimbabwean shopkeeper.

      A judge ordered DNA tests performed,
      hoping for a scientific resolution of the matter

      Meanwhile, a paint company began running
      newspaper advertisements last weekend
      with his photograph and the tagline:
      "Any color you can think of" .

      No matter what his true lineage, Happy has come
      to symbolize the intensity with which South Africans
      still scrutinize matters of race - years after apartheid's
      demise and despite real progress toward
      building an integrated society.

      Of course, under apartheid, Happy's case would
      have been much more than a custody battle.

      The court's decision on his race would have determined
      where and with whom, as a white, black or colored
      person, he could legally live, work and play
      Such formal barriers between the races
      have now disappeared, but not their legacy.

      Indeed, parsing the racial makeup of others

      "has always nbeen a bizarre obsession in this society,"

      said Graeme Simpson, executive director of
      the Center for the Study of Violence and
      Reconciliation, which studies racial attitudes

      "Who you are and where you come from
      completely dictated what you had access
      to and what your place in society was".

      To blacks, especially those in the all-black
      township of Tweefontein, Happy's
      accusation of having been enslaved
      smacks of ingratitude.

      "He should be grateful," said Martha Jiane,
      a neighbor of the family that raised Happy
      and the mother of one of his playmates
      "No one should have raised a white boy here,
      paying his school fees and taking care of him
      Black people are poor, but as for white
      people, all I know is that they are rich".

      Happy, who the authorities believe is 16 years old, first
      appeared in Tweefontein in 1990, in the company of Betty
      Sindane, the daughter of a successful local farmer.
      Koos Sindane, Betty's father, said he asked
      his daughter where she had found this white boy.
      "She said his mother had abandoned him,"
      Mr. Sindane said, sitting in a shady spot
      of the grassy courtyard of his home
      "I felt sorry for him and treated him as one
      of my grandsons even if he was a white".
      Mr. Sindane said his daughter, who died last year,
      told him she was in Johannesburg when a woman
      named Rina asked her if she could watch the little
      boy who was with her, whom she called Happy,
      while Rina went to the liquor store Ms. Sindane
      agreed, but Rina never returned.
      Worried that his mother would miss
      him, Ms. Sindane took the boy to a
      police station and filed a report.
      The police said she should take Happy
      home and wait for them to call.
      But they never did, and eventually
      Ms. Sindane secured
      An affidavit that said Happy had been abandoned.
      She informally adopted the boy, and eventually
      brought him to her father's house.

      Happy had a relatively normal boyhood in Tweefontein,
      despite his physical differences from those around him.
      But as the years passed, most of the people who
      knew him simply forgot that he was different.

      But Happy's attitude seemed to change when
      Betty Sindane, whom he called his mother, died.

      Friends said he was inconsolable,
      often going to her grave to weep
      He felt very alone, Mr. Nkabinde said.

      On May 19, Happy told his friend Petros
      he was going to leave home for good.

      He took a minibus to the police
      station in Bronkhorstspruit.

      Since his case became news, government officials
      have kept Happy in protective custody.
      Before being placed in the government's care, however,
      he gave interviews to local newspapers in which
      he said he simply wanted find his real family.

      Today, government officials informed the Bothas and
      another white couple that the results of Happy's DNA
      tests showed that he could not be their son.

      His link to Ms. Ben's family was inconclusive,
      officials said, and more tests would be required.

      The court hearing to establish Happy's legal
      identity has been postponed to next month.

      Mr. Simpson, of the Center for the Study of
      Violence and Reconciliation, said the public's
      interest in Happy Sindane reminded him of
      nothing so much as the Population Registration
      Act, the apartheid-era law under which people
      were classified into RACIAL GROUPS.

      It INCLUDED MORE THAN A DOZEN
      VARIATIONS OF COLORED.

      "This just goes to show that you can rid the
      Population Registration Act from the statute books,"
      Mr. Simpson said, "but how deeply this is
      ingrained in South African's view of each
      other is incredibly powerful and symbolic
      of the difficulty of changing a society. "

      http://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/19/international/africa/19AFRI.html?
      ex=1106536834&ei=1&en=f9d642de24775826
    • j s
      Of course the test would prove if he was the child of the many white couples that were claiming him. The black DNA prescence would also disprove their claims
      Message 2 of 15 , Aug 2, 2005
        Of course the test would prove if he was the child
        of the many white couples that were claiming him.
        The "black" DNA prescence would also
        disprove their claims as well as his.

        --- multiracialbookclub <soaptalk@...> wrote:

        Agreed!

        My favorite part of your
        posting is when you stated:

        "I think it is unneccessary to have a DNA
        test just to prove this boy's is not white".

        Lol ... that was great ... and so very true!

        In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
        john <reddgold_32@y...> wrote:

        Happy doesn't look white.
        He looks more mixed race.

        He even has light brown tanned like skin.
        Now his hair is slick straight and black.
        It is not curly and blonde like before.

        In south africa,If you have lightbrown skin
        and wavy hair,you might be called white

        lol.

        I think it is unneccessary to have a DNA
        test just to prove this boy's is not white.

        multiracialbookclub <soaptalk@...> wrote:


        Listed below are some articles on the
        `curious case' of a young `coloured' man from
        South Africa by the name of `Happy Sindane'

        The one article that I found to be of particular
        interest was found at the following link:

        http://forum.mg.co.za/showthreaded.php?Number=80694

        ****************************************************
        THE CURIOUS CASE OF HAPPY SINDANE
        ****************************************************

        The Controversy:

        http://reti.blogspot.com/2004/02/black-or-white.html

        The Ruling:


        http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/918541/posts

        http://www.buzzle.com/editorials/text7-16-2003-42983.asp

        http://www.buzzle.com/editorials/text6-21-2003-41993.asp

        (DNA tests on him and scores of putative
        parents showed him to be a so-called
        coloured (person of mixed race) …

        In October, magistrate Marthinus Kruger,
        in Bronkhorstspruit, a rural town 75 miles
        north-east of Johannesburg, said police evidence
        suggested the youth was the son of a German
        by his black domestic worker, Rina Mzayiya.
        He had been abandoned at the age of six …
        and brought up by another black woman … …

        The youth, who is olive skinned, became convinced
        he was an abducted white boy when he saw the
        photo of a missing white infant on television.)


        http://www.sundaytimes.co.za/2003/07/20/news/news11.asp
        http://forum.mg.co.za/showthreaded.php?Number=80694

        Related Links of Interest:

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/71


        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/70

        The Testing:

        http://www.thestar.co.za/index.php?fSectionId=129&fArticleId=153314
        http://thescotsman.scotsman.com/s2.cfm?id=592152003

        The Claims:
        http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/3047923.stm

        The Media Exploitation:
        http://www.witness.co.za/content/2003_06/16124.htm

        http://wap.busrep.co.za/index.php?fSectionId=129&fArticleId=188243

        ******************************************
        (Note: Article was originally provided
        on another web site by `John Reddgold')
        ******************************************

        'Lost Boy' Shines Light on Race in South Africa"

        (June 19, 2003 / By Lydia Polgreen
        Bronkhorstpruit, South Africa, June 17) –

        Happy Sindane was always an oddity
        in Tweefontein township.

        In a country where, almost a decade after the end of
        apartheid, the races seldom live side by side, Happy's
        blond head bobbed in a sea of tight black curls.

        In soccer games, played on dusty fields by barefoot
        boys with a homemade ball of plastic bags
        and twine, his pale feet stood out.

        Then, last month, Happy walked into a police
        station in this sleepy town about 60 miles
        northeast of Johannesburg.

        Speaking in Ndebele, his only tongue, Happy,
        now a teenager, told an officer that he was white
        and had been kidnapped from his Afrikaner parents
        by a family maid when he was a little boy
        The woman had taken him to a black township,
        he said, where he was virtually enslaved
        by the black family that raised him.

        Overnight, Happy was transformed from
        a local curiosity into a national sensation

        The Bronkhorstspruit police station was flooded
        with callers claiming to be Happy's parents.

        Jan and Sarie Botha, a poor white couple from Pretoria,
        emerged as the most credible of the white claimants

        But no sooner had they stepped forward than Tozi Ben,
        a Xhosa woman, announced that Happy was actually
        of mixed race, or colored as they say here,
        the issue of a romance between her cousin
        and a white Zimbabwean shopkeeper.

        A judge ordered DNA tests performed,
        hoping for a scientific resolution of the matter

        Meanwhile, a paint company began running
        newspaper advertisements last weekend
        with his photograph and the tagline:
        "Any color you can think of" .

        No matter what his true lineage, Happy has come
        to symbolize the intensity with which South Africans

        still scrutinize matters of race - years after
        apartheid's demise and despite real progress
        toward building an integrated society.

        Of course, under apartheid, Happy's case would
        have been much more than a custody battle.

        The court's decision on his race would have
        determined where and with whom, as a white, black
        or colored person, he could legally live, work and play
        Such formal barriers between the races
        have now disappeared, but not their legacy.

        Indeed, parsing the racial makeup of others
        "has always nbeen a bizarre
        obsession in this society,"

        said Graeme Simpson, executive director of
        the Center for the Study of Violence and
        Reconciliation, which studies racial attitudes

        "Who you are and where you come from
        completely dictated what you had access
        to and what your place in society was".

        To blacks, especially those in the all-black
        township of Tweefontein, Happy's
        accusation of having been enslaved
        smacks of ingratitude.

        "He should be grateful," said Martha Jiane,
        a neighbor of the family that raised Happy
        and the mother of one of his playmates
        "No one should have raised a white boy here,
        paying his school fees and taking care of him
        Black people are poor, but as for white
        people, all I know is that they are rich".

        Happy, who the authorities believe is 16 years old,
        first appeared in Tweefontein in 1990, in the company of
        Betty Sindane, the daughter of a successful local farmer.
        Koos Sindane, Betty's father, said he asked
        his daughter where she had found this white boy.
        "She said his mother had abandoned him,"
        Mr. Sindane said, sitting in a shady spot
        of the grassy courtyard of his home
      • multiracialbookclub
        Listed below are some articles on the results of the rather `curious case of a `Coloured young person from South Africa by the name of `Happy Sindane .
        Message 3 of 15 , Nov 20, 2006

          Listed below are some articles on the results of  the
          rather `curious case' of a `Coloured' young person 
          from South Africa by the name of `Happy Sindane'.


          Happy Sindane

          The one article that I found to be of particular
          interest --- was found at the following link:

          http://forum.mg.co.za/showthreaded.php?Number=80694


          ********************************************

          THE CURIOUS CASE OF HAPPY SINDANE


          ********************************************

          The Controversy:

          http://reti.blogspot.com/2004/02/black-or-white.html

          The Ruling:

          http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/918541/posts
          http://www.buzzle.com/editorials/text7-16-2003-42983.asp
          http://www.buzzle.com/editorials/text6-21-2003-41993.asp

          DNA tests on him and scores of putative
          parents showed him to be a so-called
          Coloured (a person of Mixed-Race) …


          In October, magistrate Marthinus Kruger,
          in Bronkhorstspruit, a rural town 75 miles
          north-east of Johannesburg, said police
          evidence suggested the youth was
          the son of a German by his Black
          domestic worker, Rina Mzayiya.

          He had been abandoned at the age of six …
          and brought up by another Black woman …



          The youth, who is olive-skinned, became convinced
          he was an abducted White boy when he saw the
          photo of a missing White infant on television
          .

          http://www.sundaytimes.co.za/2003/07/20/news/news11.asp
          http://forum.mg.co.za/showthreaded.php?Number=80694

          Related Links of Interest:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/71
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/70

          The Testing:
          http://www.thestar.co.za/index.php?fSectionId=129&fArticleId=153314
          http://thescotsman.scotsman.com/s2.cfm?id=592152003

          The Claims:
          http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/3047923.stm

          The Media Exploitation:
          http://www.witness.co.za/content/2003_06/16124.htm
          http://wap.busrep.co.za/index.php?fSectionId=129&fArticleId=188243



          *****************************************************

          'Lost Boy' Shines Light on Race in South Africa"

          *****************************************************


          (June 19, 2003 / By Lydia Polgreen
          Bronkhorstpruit, South Africa, June 17) –

          Happy Sindane was always an
          oddity in Tweefontein township.

          In a country where, almost a decade after the end of
          apartheid, the races seldom live side by side, Happy's
          blond head bobbed in a sea of tight black curls.

          In soccer games, played on dusty fields by barefoot
          boys with a homemade ball of plastic bags
          and twine, his pale feet stood out.

          Then, last month, Happy walked into a police
          station in this sleepy town about 60 miles
          northeast of Johannesburg.

          Speaking in Ndebele, his only tongue, Happy,
          now a teenager, told an officer that he was White
          and had been kidnapped from his Afrikaner parents
          by a family maid when he was a little boy.

          The woman had taken him to a black township,
          he said, where he was virtually enslaved
          by the Black family that raised him.

          Overnight, Happy was transformed from
          a local curiosity into a national sensation

          The Bronkhorstspruit police station was flooded
          with callers claiming to be Happy's parents.

          Jan and Sarie Botha, a poor White couple from Pretoria,
          emerged as the most credible of the White claimants

          But no sooner had they stepped forward than Tozi Ben,
          a Xhosa woman, announced that Happy was actually of
          Mixed-Race, or 'Colored' ... e issue of a romance between
          her cousin and a White Zimbabwean shopkeeper.

          A judge ordered DNA tests performed,
          hoping for a scientific resolution of the matter

          Meanwhile, a paint company began running
          newspaper advertisements last weekend
          with his photograph and the tagline:

          "Any color you can think of" .

          No matter what his true lineage,  Happy has come
          to symbolize the intensity with which South Africans
          still scrutinize matters of race - years after apartheid's
          demise and despite real progress toward
          building an integrated society.

          Of course, under apartheid, Happy's case would
          have been much more than a custody battle.

          The court's decision on his race would have determined
          where and with whom, as a White, Black or Colored
          person, he could legally live, work and play.

          Such formal barriers between the races
          have now disappeared, but not their legacy.

          Indeed, parsing the racial makeup of others

          "has always nbeen a bizarre obsession in this society,"

          said Graeme Simpson, executive director of
          the Center for the Study of Violence and
          Reconciliation, which studies racial attitudes

          "Who you are and where you come from
          completely dictated what you had access
          to and what your place in society was".

          To Blacks, especially those in the all-Black
          township of Tweefontein, Happy's
          accusation of having been enslaved
          smacks of ingratitude.

          "He should be grateful," said Martha Jiane,
          a neighbor of the family that raised Happy
          and the mother of one of his playmates.

          "No one should have raised a White boy here,
          paying his school fees and taking care of him.

          Black people are poor, but as for White
          people, all I know is that they are rich".

          Happy, who the authorities believe is 16 years old, first
          appeared in Tweefontein in 1990, in the company of Betty
          Sindane, the daughter of a successful local farmer.

          Koos Sindane, Betty's father, said he asked
          his daughter where she had found this White boy.

          "She said his mother had abandoned him,"
          Mr. Sindane said, sitting in a shady spot
          of the grassy courtyard of his home
          "I felt sorry for him and treated him as one
          of my grandsons even if he was a White".

          Mr. Sindane said his daughter, who died last year,
          told him she was in Johannesburg when a woman
          named Rina asked her if she could watch the little
          boy who was with her, whom she called Happy,
          while Rina went to the liquor store Ms. Sindane
          agreed, but Rina never returned.

          Worried that his mother would miss
          him, Ms. Sindane took the boy to a
          police station and filed a report.

          The police said she should take Happy
          home and wait for them to call.

          But they never did, and eventually Ms. Sindane
          secured an affidavit that said Happy had been abandoned.

          She informally adopted the boy, and eventually
          brought him to her father's house.

          Happy had a relatively normal boyhood in Tweefontein,
          despite his physical differences from those around him.

          But as the years passed, most of the people who
          knew him simply forgot that he was different.

          But Happy's attitude seemed to change when
          Betty Sindane, whom he called his mother, died.

          Friends said he was inconsolable,
          often going to her grave to weep.

          He felt very alone, Mr. Nkabinde said.

          On May 19, Happy told his friend Petros
          he was going to leave home for good.

          He took a minibus to the police
          station in Bronkhorstspruit.

          Since his case became news, government officials
          have kept Happy in protective custody.

          Before being placed in the government's care, however,
          he gave interviews to local newspapers in which
          he said he simply wanted find his real family.

          Today, government officials informed the Bothas and
          another White couple that the results of Happy's DNA
          tests showed that he could not be their son.

          His link to Ms. Ben's family was inconclusive,
          officials said, and more tests would be required.

          The court hearing to establish Happy's legal
          identity has been postponed to next month.

          Mr. Simpson, of the Center for the Study of
          Violence and Reconciliation, said the public's
          interest in Happy Sindane reminded him of
          nothing so much as the Population Registration
          Act, the apartheid-era law under which people
          were classified into RACIAL GROUPS.

          It INCLUDED MORE THAN A DOZEN
          VARIATIONS OF 'COLORED'.

          "This just goes to show that you can rid the
          Population Registration Act from the statute books,"
          Mr. Simpson said, "but how deeply this is
          ingrained in South African's view of each
          other is incredibly powerful and symbolic
          of the difficulty of changing a society. "

          http://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/19/international/africa/19AFRI.html?ex=1106536834&ei=1&en=f9d642de24775826  

        • wintyreeve@aol.com
          Thats a page turner! When the movie comes out..hehe..Angelina can play Happy! She might make a convincing man :p Blessings, Lynn
          Message 4 of 15 , Nov 20, 2006
            Thats a page turner!
             
            When the movie comes out..hehe..Angelina can play Happy! She might make a convincing man :p
             
            Blessings, Lynn
          • j s
            You know, he kind of looks like Brad Pitt - just dye the hair, get him some hair grease and get him some contacts multiracialbookclub
            Message 5 of 15 , Nov 21, 2006
              You know, he kind of looks like Brad Pitt - just dye the hair, get him some hair grease and get him some contacts

              multiracialbookclub <soaptalk@...> wrote:
              Listed below are some articles on the results of  the
              rather `curious case' of a `Coloured' young person 
              from South Africa by the name of `Happy Sindane'.


              Happy Sindane

              The one article that I found to be of particular
              interest --- was found at the following link:

              http://forum. mg.co.za/ showthreaded. php?Number= 80694


              ************ ********* ********* ********* *****

              THE CURIOUS CASE OF HAPPY SINDANE


              ************ ********* ********* ********* *****

              The Controversy:

              http://reti. blogspot. com/2004/ 02/black- or-white. html

              The Ruling:

              http://www.freerepu blic.com/ focus/f-news/ 918541/posts
              http://www.buzzle. com/editorials/ text7-16- 2003-42983. asp
              http://www.buzzle. com/editorials/ text6-21- 2003-41993. asp

              DNA tests on him and scores of putative
              parents showed him to be a so-called
              Coloured (a person of Mixed-Race) …


              In October, magistrate Marthinus Kruger,
              in Bronkhorstspruit, a rural town 75 miles
              north-east of Johannesburg, said police
              evidence suggested the youth was
              the son of a German by his Black
              domestic worker, Rina Mzayiya.

              He had been abandoned at the age of six …
              and brought up by another Black woman …



              The youth, who is olive-skinned, became convinced
              he was an abducted White boy when he saw the
              photo of a missing White infant on television
              .

              http://www.sundayti mes.co.za/ 2003/07/20/ news/news11. asp
              http://forum. mg.co.za/ showthreaded. php?Number= 80694

              Related Links of Interest:
              http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 71
              http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 70

              The Testing:
              http://www.thestar. co.za/index. php?fSectionId= 129&fArticleId=153314
              http://thescotsman. scotsman. com/s2.cfm? id=592152003

              The Claims:
              http://news. bbc.co.uk/ 1/hi/world/ africa/3047923. stm

              The Media Exploitation:
              http://www.witness. co.za/content/ 2003_06/16124. htm
              http://wap.busrep. co.za/index. php?fSectionId= 129&fArticleId=188243



              ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* *****

              'Lost Boy' Shines Light on Race in South Africa"

              ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* *****


              (June 19, 2003 / By Lydia Polgreen
              Bronkhorstpruit, South Africa, June 17) –

              Happy Sindane was always an
              oddity in Tweefontein township.

              In a country where, almost a decade after the end of
              apartheid, the races seldom live side by side, Happy's
              blond head bobbed in a sea of tight black curls.

              In soccer games, played on dusty fields by barefoot
              boys with a homemade ball of plastic bags
              and twine, his pale feet stood out.

              Then, last month, Happy walked into a police
              station in this sleepy town about 60 miles
              northeast of Johannesburg.

              Speaking in Ndebele, his only tongue, Happy,
              now a teenager, told an officer that he was White
              and had been kidnapped from his Afrikaner parents
              by a family maid when he was a little boy.

              The woman had taken him to a black township,
              he said, where he was virtually enslaved
              by the Black family that raised him.

              Overnight, Happy was transformed from
              a local curiosity into a national sensation

              The Bronkhorstspruit police station was flooded
              with callers claiming to be Happy's parents.

              Jan and Sarie Botha, a poor White couple from Pretoria,
              emerged as the most credible of the White claimants

              But no sooner had they stepped forward than Tozi Ben,
              a Xhosa woman, announced that Happy was actually of
              Mixed-Race, or 'Colored' ... e issue of a romance between
              her cousin and a White Zimbabwean shopkeeper.

              A judge ordered DNA tests performed,
              hoping for a scientific resolution of the matter

              Meanwhile, a paint company began running
              newspaper advertisements last weekend
              with his photograph and the tagline:

              "Any color you can think of" .

              No matter what his true lineage,  Happy has come
              to symbolize the intensity with which South Africans
              still scrutinize matters of race - years after apartheid's
              demise and despite real progress toward
              building an integrated society.

              Of course, under apartheid, Happy's case would
              have been much more than a custody battle.

              The court's decision on his race would have determined
              where and with whom, as a White, Black or Colored
              person, he could legally live, work and play.

              Such formal barriers between the races
              have now disappeared, but not their legacy.

              Indeed, parsing the racial makeup of others

              "has always nbeen a bizarre obsession in this society,"

              said Graeme Simpson, executive director of
              the Center for the Study of Violence and
              Reconciliation, which studies racial attitudes

              "Who you are and where you come from
              completely dictated what you had access
              to and what your place in society was".

              To Blacks, especially those in the all-Black
              township of Tweefontein, Happy's
              accusation of having been enslaved
              smacks of ingratitude.

              "He should be grateful," said Martha Jiane,
              a neighbor of the family that raised Happy
              and the mother of one of his playmates.

              "No one should have raised a White boy here,
              paying his school fees and taking care of him.

              Black people are poor, but as for White
              people, all I know is that they are rich".

              Happy, who the authorities believe is 16 years old, first
              appeared in Tweefontein in 1990, in the company of Betty
              Sindane, the daughter of a successful local farmer.

              Koos Sindane, Betty's father, said he asked
              his daughter where she had found this White boy.

              "She said his mother had abandoned him,"
              Mr. Sindane said, sitting in a shady spot
              of the grassy courtyard of his home
              "I felt sorry for him and treated him as one
              of my grandsons even if he was a White".

              Mr. Sindane said his daughter, who died last year,
              told him she was in Johannesburg when a woman
              named Rina asked her if she could watch the little
              boy who was with her, whom she called Happy,
              while Rina went to the liquor store Ms. Sindane
              agreed, but Rina never returned.

              Worried that his mother would miss
              him, Ms. Sindane took the boy to a
              police station and filed a report.

              The police said she should take Happy
              home and wait for them to call.

              But they never did, and eventually Ms. Sindane
              secured an affidavit that said Happy had been abandoned.

              She informally adopted the boy, and eventually
              brought him to her father's house.

              Happy had a relatively normal boyhood in Tweefontein,
              despite his physical differences from those around him.

              But as the years passed, most of the people who
              knew him simply forgot that he was different.

              But Happy's attitude seemed to change when
              Betty Sindane, whom he called his mother, died.

              Friends said he was inconsolable,
              often going to her grave to weep.

              He felt very alone, Mr. Nkabinde said.

              On May 19, Happy told his friend Petros
              he was going to leave home for good.

              He took a minibus to the police
              station in Bronkhorstspruit.

              Since his case became news, government officials
              have kept Happy in protective custody.

              Before being placed in the government's care, however,
              he gave interviews to local newspapers in which
              he said he simply wanted find his real family.

              Today, government officials informed the Bothas and
              another White couple that the results of Happy's DNA
              tests showed that he could not be their son.

              His link to Ms. Ben's family was inconclusive,
              officials said, and more tests would be required.

              The court hearing to establish Happy's legal
              identity has been postponed to next month.

              Mr. Simpson, of the Center for the Study of
              Violence and Reconciliation, said the public's
              interest in Happy Sindane reminded him of
              nothing so much as the Population Registration
              Act, the apartheid-era law under which people
              were classified into RACIAL GROUPS.

              It INCLUDED MORE THAN A DOZEN
              VARIATIONS OF 'COLORED'.

              "This just goes to show that you can rid the
              Population Registration Act from the statute books,"
              Mr. Simpson said, "but how deeply this is
              ingrained in South African's view of each
              other is incredibly powerful and symbolic
              of the difficulty of changing a society. "

              http://www.nytimes. com/2003/ 06/19/internatio nal/africa/ 19AFRI.html?ex=1106536834&ei=1&en=f9d642de24775826  


              Sponsored Link

              Want a degree but can't afford to quit? Online degrees from top schools - in as fast as 1 year

            • j s
              Here it is, with a little help from Photoshop [[NOTE: Picture is at bottom of page]] j s wrote: You know, he kind of looks like Brad
              Message 6 of 15 , Nov 21, 2006
                Here it is, with a little help from Photoshop

                [[NOTE: Picture is at bottom of page]]



                j s <creolescience@...> wrote:
                You know, he kind of looks like Brad Pitt - just dye the
                hair, get him some hair grease and get him some contacts

                multiracialbookclub <soaptalk@hotmail. com> wrote:
                Listed below are some articles on the results of  the
                rather `curious case' of a `Coloured' young person 
                from South Africa by the name of `Happy Sindane'.


                Happy Sindane

                The one article that I found to be of particular
                interest --- was found at the following link:

                http://forum. mg.co.za/ showthreaded. php?Number= 80694


                ************ ********* ********* ********* *****

                THE CURIOUS CASE OF HAPPY SINDANE


                ************ ********* ********* ********* *****

                The Controversy:

                http://reti. blogspot. com/2004/ 02/black- or-white. html

                The Ruling:

                http://www.freerepu blic.com/ focus/f-news/ 918541/posts
                http://www.buzzle. com/editorials/ text7-16- 2003-42983. asp
                http://www.buzzle. com/editorials/ text6-21- 2003-41993. asp

                DNA tests on him and scores of putative
                parents showed him to be a so-called
                Coloured (a person of Mixed-Race) …


                In October, magistrate Marthinus Kruger,
                in Bronkhorstspruit, a rural town 75 miles
                north-east of Johannesburg, said police
                evidence suggested the youth was
                the son of a German by his Black
                domestic worker, Rina Mzayiya.

                He had been abandoned at the age of six …
                and brought up by another Black woman …



                The youth, who is olive-skinned, became convinced
                he was an abducted White boy when he saw the
                photo of a missing White infant on television
                .

                http://www.sundayti mes.co.za/ 2003/07/20/ news/news11. asp
                http://forum. mg.co.za/ showthreaded. php?Number= 80694

                Related Links of Interest:
                http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 71
                http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 70

                The Testing:
                http://www.thestar. co.za/index. php?fSectionId= 129&fArticleId=153314
                http://thescotsman. scotsman. com/s2.cfm? id=592152003

                The Claims:
                http://news. bbc.co.uk/ 1/hi/world/ africa/3047923. stm

                The Media Exploitation:
                http://www.witness. co.za/content/ 2003_06/16124. htm
                http://wap.busrep. co.za/index. php?fSectionId= 129&fArticleId=188243



                ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* *****

                'Lost Boy' Shines Light on Race in South Africa"

                ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* *****


                (June 19, 2003 / By Lydia Polgreen
                Bronkhorstpruit, South Africa, June 17) –

                Happy Sindane was always an
                oddity in Tweefontein township.

                In a country where, almost a decade after the end of
                apartheid, the races seldom live side by side, Happy's
                blond head bobbed in a sea of tight black curls.

                In soccer games, played on dusty fields by barefoot
                boys with a homemade ball of plastic bags
                and twine, his pale feet stood out.

                Then, last month, Happy walked into a police
                station in this sleepy town about 60 miles
                northeast of Johannesburg.

                Speaking in Ndebele, his only tongue, Happy,
                now a teenager, told an officer that he was White
                and had been kidnapped from his Afrikaner parents
                by a family maid when he was a little boy.

                The woman had taken him to a black township,
                he said, where he was virtually enslaved
                by the Black family that raised him.

                Overnight, Happy was transformed from
                a local curiosity into a national sensation

                The Bronkhorstspruit police station was flooded
                with callers claiming to be Happy's parents.

                Jan and Sarie Botha, a poor White couple from Pretoria,
                emerged as the most credible of the White claimants

                But no sooner had they stepped forward than Tozi Ben,
                a Xhosa woman, announced that Happy was actually of
                Mixed-Race, or 'Colored' ... e issue of a romance between
                her cousin and a White Zimbabwean shopkeeper.

                A judge ordered DNA tests performed,
                hoping for a scientific resolution of the matter

                Meanwhile, a paint company began running
                newspaper advertisements last weekend
                with his photograph and the tagline:

                "Any color you can think of" .

                No matter what his true lineage,  Happy has come
                to symbolize the intensity with which South Africans
                still scrutinize matters of race - years after apartheid's
                demise and despite real progress toward
                building an integrated society.

                Of course, under apartheid, Happy's case would
                have been much more than a custody battle.

                The court's decision on his race would have determined
                where and with whom, as a White, Black or Colored
                person, he could legally live, work and play.

                Such formal barriers between the races
                have now disappeared, but not their legacy.

                Indeed, parsing the racial makeup of others

                "has always nbeen a bizarre obsession in this society,"

                said Graeme Simpson, executive director of
                the Center for the Study of Violence and
                Reconciliation, which studies racial attitudes

                "Who you are and where you come from
                completely dictated what you had access
                to and what your place in society was".

                To Blacks, especially those in the all-Black
                township of Tweefontein, Happy's
                accusation of having been enslaved
                smacks of ingratitude.

                "He should be grateful," said Martha Jiane,
                a neighbor of the family that raised Happy
                and the mother of one of his playmates.

                "No one should have raised a White boy here,
                paying his school fees and taking care of him.

                Black people are poor, but as for White
                people, all I know is that they are rich".

                Happy, who the authorities believe is 16 years old, first
                appeared in Tweefontein in 1990, in the company of Betty
                Sindane, the daughter of a successful local farmer.

                Koos Sindane, Betty's father, said he asked
                his daughter where she had found this White boy.

                "She said his mother had abandoned him,"
                Mr. Sindane said, sitting in a shady spot
                of the grassy courtyard of his home
                "I felt sorry for him and treated him as one
                of my grandsons even if he was a White".

                Mr. Sindane said his daughter, who died last year,
                told him she was in Johannesburg when a woman
                named Rina asked her if she could watch the little
                boy who was with her, whom she called Happy,
                while Rina went to the liquor store Ms. Sindane
                agreed, but Rina never returned.

                Worried that his mother would miss
                him, Ms. Sindane took the boy to a
                police station and filed a report.

                The police said she should take Happy
                home and wait for them to call.

                But they never did, and eventually Ms. Sindane
                secured an affidavit that said Happy had been abandoned.

                She informally adopted the boy, and eventually
                brought him to her father's house.

                Happy had a relatively normal boyhood in Tweefontein,
                despite his physical differences from those around him.

                But as the years passed, most of the people who
                knew him simply forgot that he was different.

                But Happy's attitude seemed to change when
                Betty Sindane, whom he called his mother, died.

                Friends said he was inconsolable,
                often going to her grave to weep.

                He felt very alone, Mr. Nkabinde said.

                On May 19, Happy told his friend Petros
                he was going to leave home for good.

                He took a minibus to the police
                station in Bronkhorstspruit.

                Since his case became news, government officials
                have kept Happy in protective custody.

                Before being placed in the government's care, however,
                he gave interviews to local newspapers in which
                he said he simply wanted find his real family.

                Today, government officials informed the Bothas and
                another White couple that the results of Happy's DNA
                tests showed that he could not be their son.

                His link to Ms. Ben's family was inconclusive,
                officials said, and more tests would be required.

                The court hearing to establish Happy's legal
                identity has been postponed to next month.

                Mr. Simpson, of the Center for the Study of
                Violence and Reconciliation, said the public's
                interest in Happy Sindane reminded him of
                nothing so much as the Population Registration
                Act, the apartheid-era law under which people
                were classified into RACIAL GROUPS.

                It INCLUDED MORE THAN A DOZEN
                VARIATIONS OF 'COLORED'.

                "This just goes to show that you can rid the
                Population Registration Act from the statute books,"
                Mr. Simpson said, "but how deeply this is
                ingrained in South African's view of each
                other is incredibly powerful and symbolic
                of the difficulty of changing a society. "

                http://www.nytimes. com/2003/ 06/19/internatio nal/africa/ 19AFRI.html?ex=1106536834&ei=1&en=f9d642de24775826  


                Sponsored Link






              • tlbaker1
                You re insane, LOLOLOL!!! just dye the hair, get him some hair grease and get him some contacts Lynne _____ From: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
                Message 7 of 15 , Nov 21, 2006

                  You're insane, LOLOLOL!!!

                   

                  just dye the hair, get him some hair grease and get him some contacts

                   

                  Lynne

                   


                  From: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
                  [mailto: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com ]
                  On Behalf Of
                  j s
                  Sent: Tuesday, November 21, 2006 3:38 PM
                  To: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: The 'Results' of the 'Curious' Case of Happy Sindane

                   

                  You know, he kind of looks like Brad Pitt - just dye the
                  hair, get him some hair grease and get him some contacts

                  multiracialbookclub <soaptalk@...> wrote:

                  Listed below are some articles on the results of  the
                  rather `curious case' of a `Coloured' young person 
                  from South Africa by the name of `Happy Sindane'.


                  Happy Sindane

                  The one article that I found to be of particular
                  interest --- was found at the following link:

                  http://forum. mg.co.za/ showthreaded. php?Number= 80694


                  ************ ********* ********* ********* *****

                  THE CURIOUS CASE OF HAPPY SINDANE

                  ************ ********* ********* ********* *****

                  The Controversy:

                  http://reti. blogspot. com/2004/ 02/black- or-white. html

                  The Ruling:

                  http://www.freerepu blic.com/ focus/f-news/ 918541/posts
                  http://www.buzzle. com/editorials/ text7-16- 2003-42983. asp
                  http://www.buzzle. com/editorials/ text6-21- 2003-41993. asp

                  DNA tests on him and scores of putative
                  parents showed him to be a so-called
                  Coloured (a person of Mixed-Race) …


                  In October, magistrate Marthinus Kruger,
                  in Bronkhorstspruit, a rural town 75 miles
                  north-east of Johannesburg , said police
                  evidence suggested the youth was
                  the son of a German by his Black
                  domestic worker, Rina Mzayiya.

                  He had been abandoned at the age of six …
                  and brought up by another Black woman …



                  The youth, who is olive-skinned, became convinced
                  he was an abducted White boy when he saw the
                  photo of a missing White infant on television
                  .
                  http://www.sundayti mes.co.za/ 2003/07/20/ news/news11. asp
                  http://forum. mg.co.za/ showthreaded. php?Number= 80694

                  Related Links of Interest:
                  http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 71
                  http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 70

                  The Testing:
                  http://www.thestar. co.za/index. php?fSectionId= 129&fArticleId=153314
                  http://thescotsman. scotsman. com/s2.cfm? id=592152003

                  The Claims:
                  http://news. bbc.co.uk/ 1/hi/world/ africa/3047923. stm

                  The Media Exploitation:
                  http://www.witness. co.za/content/ 2003_06/16124. htm
                  http://wap.busrep. co.za/index. php?fSectionId= 129&fArticleId=188243



                  ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* *****

                  'Lost Boy' Shines Light on Race in South Africa "

                  ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* *****


                  (June 19, 2003 / By Lydia Polgreen
                  Bronkhorstpruit , South Africa , June 17) –

                  Happy Sindane was always an
                  oddity in Tweefontein township.

                  In a country where, almost a decade after the end of
                  apartheid, the races seldom live side by side, Happy's
                  blond head bobbed in a sea of tight black curls.

                  In soccer games, played on dusty fields by barefoot
                  boys with a homemade ball of plastic bags
                  and twine, his pale feet stood out.

                  Then, last month, Happy walked into a police
                  station in this sleepy town about 60 miles
                  northeast of Johannesburg .

                  Speaking in Ndebele, his only tongue, Happy,
                  now a teenager, told an officer that he was White
                  and had been kidnapped from his Afrikaner parents
                  by a family maid when he was a little boy.

                  The woman had taken him to a black township,
                  he said, where he was virtually enslaved
                  by the Black family that raised him.

                  Overnight, Happy was transformed from
                  a local curiosity into a national sensation

                  The Bronkhorstspruit police station was flooded
                  with callers claiming to be Happy's parents.

                  Jan and Sarie Botha, a poor White couple from Pretoria ,
                  emerged as the most credible of the White claimants

                  But no sooner had they stepped forward than Tozi Ben,
                  a Xhosa woman, announced that Happy was actually of
                  Mixed-Race, or 'Colored' ... e issue of a romance between
                  her cousin and a White Zimbabwean shopkeeper.

                  A judge ordered DNA tests performed,
                  hoping for a scientific resolution of the matter

                  Meanwhile, a paint company began running
                  newspaper advertisements last weekend
                  with his photograph and the tagline:

                  "Any color you can think of" .

                  No matter what his true lineage,  Happy has come
                  to symbolize the intensity with which South Africans
                  still scrutinize matters of race - years after apartheid's
                  demise and despite real progress toward
                  building an integrated society.

                  Of course, under apartheid, Happy's case would
                  have been much more than a custody battle.

                  The court's decision on his race would have determined
                  where and with whom, as a White, Black or Colored
                  person, he could legally live, work and play.

                  Such formal barriers between the races
                  have now disappeared, but not their legacy.

                  Indeed, parsing the racial makeup of others

                  "has always nbeen a bizarre obsession in this society,"

                  said Graeme Simpson, executive director of
                  the Center for the Study of Violence and
                  Reconciliation, which studies racial attitudes

                  "Who you are and where you come from
                  completely dictated what you had access
                  to and what your place in society was".

                  To Blacks, especially those in the all-Black
                  township of Tweefontein , Happy's
                  accusation of having been enslaved
                  smacks of ingratitude.

                  "He should be grateful," said Martha Jiane,
                  a neighbor of the family that raised Happy
                  and the mother of one of his playmates.

                  "No one should have raised a White boy here,
                  paying his school fees and taking care of him.

                  Black people are poor, but as for White
                  people, all I know is that they are rich".

                  Happy, who the authorities believe is 16 years old, first
                  appeared in Tweefontein in 1990, in the company of Betty
                  Sindane, the daughter of a successful local farmer.

                  Koos Sindane, Betty's father, said he asked
                  his daughter where she had found this White boy.

                  "She said his mother had abandoned him,"
                  Mr. Sindane said, sitting in a shady spot
                  of the grassy courtyard of his home
                  "I felt sorry for him and treated him as one
                  of my grandsons even if he was a White".

                  Mr. Sindane said his daughter, who died last year,
                  told him she was in Johannesburg when a woman
                  named Rina asked her if she could watch the little
                  boy who was with her, whom she called Happy,
                  while Rina went to the liquor store Ms. Sindane
                  agreed, but Rina never returned.

                  Worried that his mother would miss
                  him, Ms. Sindane took the boy to a
                  police station and filed a report.

                  The police said she should take Happy
                  home and wait for them to call.

                  But they never did, and eventually Ms. Sindane
                  secured an affidavit that said Happy had been abandoned.

                  She informally adopted the boy, and eventually
                  brought him to her father's house.

                  Happy had a relatively normal boyhood in Tweefontein,
                  despite his physical differences from those around him.

                  But as the years passed, most of the people who
                  knew him simply forgot that he was different.

                  But Happy's attitude seemed to change when
                  Betty Sindane, whom he called his mother, died.

                  Friends said he was inconsolable,
                  often going to her grave to weep.

                  He felt very alone, Mr. Nkabinde said.

                  On May 19, Happy told his friend Petros
                  he was going to leave home for good.

                  He took a minibus to the police
                  station in Bronkhorstspruit.

                  Since his case became news, government officials
                  have kept Happy in protective custody.

                  Before being placed in the government's care, however,
                  he gave interviews to local newspapers in which
                  he said he simply wanted find his real family.

                  Today, government officials informed the Bothas and
                  another White couple that the results of Happy's DNA
                  tests showed that he could not be their son.

                  His link to Ms. Ben's family was inconclusive,
                  officials said, and more tests would be required.

                  The court hearing to establish Happy's legal
                  identity has been postponed to next month.

                  Mr. Simpson, of the Center for the Study of
                  Violence and Reconciliation, said the public's
                  interest in Happy Sindane reminded him of
                  nothing so much as the Population Registration
                  Act, the apartheid-era law under which people
                  were classified into RACIAL GROUPS.

                  It INCLUDED MORE THAN A DOZEN
                  VARIATIONS OF 'COLORED'.

                  "This just goes to show that you can rid the
                  Population Registration Act from the statute books,"
                  Mr. Simpson said, "but how deeply this is
                  ingrained in South African's view of each
                  other is incredibly powerful and symbolic
                  of the difficulty of changing a society. "

                  http://www.nytimes. com/2003/ 06/19/internatio nal/africa/ 19AFRI.html?ex=1106536834&ei=1&en=f9d642de24775826  

                   

                   




                • multiracialbookclub
                  LOLOL !!! That s great Jeff !!! [:)] But ... now that I think about it .... hmmmmmmmm ...twins ... separated at birth perhaps ... hhhhhmmmmmm [:-?] and,
                  Message 8 of 15 , Nov 21, 2006

                    LOLOL !!! That's great Jeff !!! :)

                    But ... now that I think about it .... hmmmmmmmm ...twins ...
                    separated at birth perhaps ... hhhhhmmmmmm :-? and, let's
                    face it, the name Happy Pitt does have sort of a ring to it!!!=D>


                    Go to fullsize image    Go to fullsize image  Go to fullsize image

                      Go to fullsize image    Go to fullsize image  Go to fullsize image

                    (But ... in all honesty ... some of their features
                    -- ex. nose -- really are rather strikingly similar)


                    BTW -- 'Gen-Mixed' family ... let's try to keep Brad in our
                    thoughts -- as apparently 'new-found fatherhood' has been a lot
                    harder on him, and taking a lot more of his time, than many people
                    realized .... and he's starting to let himself go  --- just a tad bit.
                      ;)

                    http://www.banane.be/images/personnalites/Brad_Pitt_a_pris_du_poids.jpg


                    j s <creolescience@...> wrote:


                    You know, he kind of looks like Brad Pitt - just dye the hair,
                    get him some hair grease and get him some contacts


                    multiracialbookclub
                    <soaptalk@...>
                    wrote:


                    Listed below are some articles on the results of  the
                    rather `curious case' of a `Coloured' young person 
                    from South Africa by the name of `Happy Sindane'.


                    Happy Sindane

                    The one article that I found to be of particular
                    interest --- was found at the following link:

                    http://forum. mg.co.za/ showthreaded. php?Number= 80694


                    ************ ********* ********* ********* *****

                    THE CURIOUS CASE OF HAPPY SINDANE


                    ************ ********* ********* ********* *****

                    The Controversy:

                    http://reti. blogspot. com/2004/ 02/black- or-white. html

                    The Ruling:

                    http://www.freerepu blic.com/ focus/f-news/ 918541/posts
                    http://www.buzzle. com/editorials/ text7-16- 2003-42983. asp
                    http://www.buzzle. com/editorials/ text6-21- 2003-41993. asp

                    DNA tests on him and scores of putative
                    parents showed him to be a so-called
                    Coloured (a person of Mixed-Race) …


                    In October, magistrate Marthinus Kruger,
                    in Bronkhorstspruit, a rural town 75 miles
                    north-east of Johannesburg, said police
                    evidence suggested the youth was
                    the son of a German by his Black
                    domestic worker, Rina Mzayiya.

                    He had been abandoned at the age of six …
                    and brought up by another Black woman …



                    The youth, who is olive-skinned, became convinced
                    he was an abducted White boy when he saw the
                    photo of a missing White infant on television
                    .

                    http://www.sundayti mes.co.za/ 2003/07/20/ news/news11. asp
                    http://forum. mg.co.za/ showthreaded. php?Number= 80694

                    Related Links of Interest:
                    http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 71
                    http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 70

                    The Testing:
                    http://www.thestar. co.za/index. php?fSectionId= 129&fArticleId=153314
                    http://thescotsman. scotsman. com/s2.cfm? id=592152003

                    The Claims:
                    http://news. bbc.co.uk/ 1/hi/world/ africa/3047923. stm

                    The Media Exploitation:
                    http://www.witness. co.za/content/ 2003_06/16124. htm
                    http://wap.busrep. co.za/index. php?fSectionId= 129&fArticleId=188243



                    ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* *****

                    'Lost Boy' Shines Light on Race in South Africa"

                    ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* *****


                    (June 19, 2003 / By Lydia Polgreen
                    Bronkhorstpruit, South Africa, June 17) –

                    Happy Sindane was always an
                    oddity in Tweefontein township.

                    In a country where, almost a decade after the end of
                    apartheid, the races seldom live side by side, Happy's
                    blond head bobbed in a sea of tight black curls.

                    In soccer games, played on dusty fields by barefoot
                    boys with a homemade ball of plastic bags
                    and twine, his pale feet stood out.

                    Then, last month, Happy walked into a police
                    station in this sleepy town about 60 miles
                    northeast of Johannesburg.

                    Speaking in Ndebele, his only tongue, Happy,
                    now a teenager, told an officer that he was White
                    and had been kidnapped from his Afrikaner parents
                    by a family maid when he was a little boy.

                    The woman had taken him to a black township,
                    he said, where he was virtually enslaved
                    by the Black family that raised him.

                    Overnight, Happy was transformed from
                    a local curiosity into a national sensation

                    The Bronkhorstspruit police station was flooded
                    with callers claiming to be Happy's parents.

                    Jan and Sarie Botha, a poor White couple from Pretoria,
                    emerged as the most credible of the White claimants

                    But no sooner had they stepped forward than Tozi Ben,
                    a Xhosa woman, announced that Happy was actually of
                    Mixed-Race, or 'Colored' ... e issue of a romance between
                    her cousin and a White Zimbabwean shopkeeper.

                    A judge ordered DNA tests performed,
                    hoping for a scientific resolution of the matter

                    Meanwhile, a paint company began running
                    newspaper advertisements last weekend
                    with his photograph and the tagline:

                    "Any color you can think of" .

                    No matter what his true lineage,  Happy has come
                    to symbolize the intensity with which South Africans
                    still scrutinize matters of race - years after apartheid's
                    demise and despite real progress toward
                    building an integrated society.

                    Of course, under apartheid, Happy's case would
                    have been much more than a custody battle.

                    The court's decision on his race would have determined
                    where and with whom, as a White, Black or Colored
                    person, he could legally live, work and play.

                    Such formal barriers between the races
                    have now disappeared, but not their legacy.

                    Indeed, parsing the racial makeup of others

                    "has always nbeen a bizarre obsession in this society,"

                    said Graeme Simpson, executive director of
                    the Center for the Study of Violence and
                    Reconciliation, which studies racial attitudes

                    "Who you are and where you come from
                    completely dictated what you had access
                    to and what your place in society was".

                    To Blacks, especially those in the all-Black
                    township of Tweefontein, Happy's
                    accusation of having been enslaved
                    smacks of ingratitude.

                    "He should be grateful," said Martha Jiane,
                    a neighbor of the family that raised Happy
                    and the mother of one of his playmates.

                    "No one should have raised a White boy here,
                    paying his school fees and taking care of him.

                    Black people are poor, but as for White
                    people, all I know is that they are rich".

                    Happy, who the authorities believe is 16 years old, first
                    appeared in Tweefontein in 1990, in the company of Betty
                    Sindane, the daughter of a successful local farmer.

                    Koos Sindane, Betty's father, said he asked
                    his daughter where she had found this White boy.

                    "She said his mother had abandoned him,"
                    Mr. Sindane said, sitting in a shady spot
                    of the grassy courtyard of his home
                    "I felt sorry for him and treated him as one
                    of my grandsons even if he was a White".

                    Mr. Sindane said his daughter, who died last year,
                    told him she was in Johannesburg when a woman
                    named Rina asked her if she could watch the little
                    boy who was with her, whom she called Happy,
                    while Rina went to the liquor store Ms. Sindane
                    agreed, but Rina never returned.

                    Worried that his mother would miss
                    him, Ms. Sindane took the boy to a
                    police station and filed a report.

                    The police said she should take Happy
                    home and wait for them to call.

                    But they never did, and eventually Ms. Sindane
                    secured an affidavit that said Happy had been abandoned.

                    She informally adopted the boy, and eventually
                    brought him to her father's house.

                    Happy had a relatively normal boyhood in Tweefontein,
                    despite his physical differences from those around him.

                    But as the years passed, most of the people who
                    knew him simply forgot that he was different.

                    But Happy's attitude seemed to change when
                    Betty Sindane, whom he called his mother, died.

                    Friends said he was inconsolable,
                    often going to her grave to weep.

                    He felt very alone, Mr. Nkabinde said.

                    On May 19, Happy told his friend Petros
                    he was going to leave home for good.

                    He took a minibus to the police
                    station in Bronkhorstspruit.

                    Since his case became news, government officials
                    have kept Happy in protective custody.

                    Before being placed in the government's care, however,
                    he gave interviews to local newspapers in which
                    he said he simply wanted find his real family.

                    Today, government officials informed the Bothas and
                    another White couple that the results of Happy's DNA
                    tests showed that he could not be their son.

                    His link to Ms. Ben's family was inconclusive,
                    officials said, and more tests would be required.

                    The court hearing to establish Happy's legal
                    identity has been postponed to next month.

                    Mr. Simpson, of the Center for the Study of
                    Violence and Reconciliation, said the public's
                    interest in Happy Sindane reminded him of
                    nothing so much as the Population Registration
                    Act, the apartheid-era law under which people
                    were classified into RACIAL GROUPS.

                    It INCLUDED MORE THAN A DOZEN
                    VARIATIONS OF 'COLORED'.

                    "This just goes to show that you can rid the
                    Population Registration Act from the statute books,"
                    Mr. Simpson said, "but how deeply this is
                    ingrained in South African's view of each
                    other is incredibly powerful and symbolic
                    of the difficulty of changing a society. "

                    http://www.nytimes. com/2003/ 06/19/internatio nal/africa/ 19AFRI.html?ex=1106536834&ei=1&en=f9d642de24775826  

                  • TLBaker
                    LOLOLOL, actually he s right they do look alike!!! Lynne _____ From: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                    Message 9 of 15 , Nov 21, 2006

                      LOLOLOL, actually he's right they do look alike!!!

                       

                      Lynne

                       


                      From: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
                      [mailto: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com ]
                      On Behalf Of
                      multiracialbookclub
                      Sent: Tuesday, November 21, 2006 9:24 PM
                      To: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: The 'Results' of the 'Curious' Case of Happy Sindane

                       

                      LOLOL !!! That's great Jeff !!! :)

                      But ... now that I think about it .... hmmmmmmmm ...twins ...
                      separated at birth perhaps ... hhhhhmmmmmm :-? and, let's
                      face it, the name Happy Pitt does have sort of a ring to it!!!=D>


                      Go to fullsize image    Go to fullsize image  Go to fullsize image

                        Go to fullsize image    Go to fullsize image  Go to fullsize image

                      (But ... in all honesty ... some of their features
                      -- ex. nose -- really are rather strikingly similar)


                      BTW -- 'Gen-Mixed' family ... let's try to keep Brad in our
                      thoughts -- as apparently 'new-found fatherhood' has been a lot
                      harder on him, and taking a lot more of his time, than many people
                      realized .... and he's starting to let himself go  --- just a tad bit.
                        ;)

                      http://www.banane.be/images/personnalites/Brad_Pitt_a_pris_du_poids.jpg


                      j s <creolescience@...> wrote:


                      You know, he kind of looks like Brad Pitt - just dye the hair,
                      get him some hair grease and get him some contacts


                      multiracialbookclub
                      <soaptalk@...>
                      wrote:


                      Listed below are some articles on the results of  the
                      rather `curious case' of a `Coloured' young person 
                      from South Africa by the name of `Happy Sindane'.


                      Happy Sindane

                      The one article that I found to be of particular
                      interest --- was found at the following link:

                      http://forum. mg.co.za/ showthreaded. php?Number= 80694


                      ************ ********* ********* ********* *****

                      THE CURIOUS CASE OF HAPPY SINDANE

                      ************ ********* ********* ********* *****

                      The Controversy:

                      http://reti. blogspot. com/2004/ 02/black- or-white. html

                      The Ruling:

                      http://www.freerepu blic.com/ focus/f-news/ 918541/posts
                      http://www.buzzle. com/editorials/ text7-16- 2003-42983. asp
                      http://www.buzzle. com/editorials/ text6-21- 2003-41993. asp

                      DNA tests on him and scores of putative
                      parents showed him to be a so-called
                      Coloured (a person of Mixed-Race) …


                      In October, magistrate Marthinus Kruger,
                      in Bronkhorstspruit, a rural town 75 miles
                      north-east of Johannesburg , said police
                      evidence suggested the youth was
                      the son of a German by his Black
                      domestic worker, Rina Mzayiya.

                      He had been abandoned at the age of six …
                      and brought up by another Black woman …



                      The youth, who is olive-skinned, became convinced
                      he was an abducted White boy when he saw the
                      photo of a missing White infant on television
                      .
                      http://www.sundayti mes.co.za/ 2003/07/20/ news/news11. asp
                      http://forum. mg.co.za/ showthreaded. php?Number= 80694

                      Related Links of Interest:
                      http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 71
                      http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 70

                      The Testing:
                      http://www.thestar. co.za/index. php?fSectionId= 129&fArticleId=153314
                      http://thescotsman. scotsman. com/s2.cfm? id=592152003

                      The Claims:
                      http://news. bbc.co.uk/ 1/hi/world/ africa/3047923. stm

                      The Media Exploitation:
                      http://www.witness. co.za/content/ 2003_06/16124. htm
                      http://wap.busrep. co.za/index. php?fSectionId= 129&fArticleId=188243



                      ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* *****

                      'Lost Boy' Shines Light on Race in South Africa "

                      ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* *****


                      (June 19, 2003 / By Lydia Polgreen
                      Bronkhorstpruit , South Africa , June 17) –

                      Happy Sindane was always an
                      oddity in Tweefontein township.

                      In a country where, almost a decade after the end of
                      apartheid, the races seldom live side by side, Happy's
                      blond head bobbed in a sea of tight black curls.

                      In soccer games, played on dusty fields by barefoot
                      boys with a homemade ball of plastic bags
                      and twine, his pale feet stood out.

                      Then, last month, Happy walked into a police
                      station in this sleepy town about 60 miles
                      northeast of Johannesburg .

                      Speaking in Ndebele, his only tongue, Happy,
                      now a teenager, told an officer that he was White
                      and had been kidnapped from his Afrikaner parents
                      by a family maid when he was a little boy.

                      The woman had taken him to a black township,
                      he said, where he was virtually enslaved
                      by the Black family that raised him.

                      Overnight, Happy was transformed from
                      a local curiosity into a national sensation

                      The Bronkhorstspruit police station was flooded
                      with callers claiming to be Happy's parents.

                      Jan and Sarie Botha, a poor White couple from Pretoria ,
                      emerged as the most credible of the White claimants

                      But no sooner had they stepped forward than Tozi Ben,
                      a Xhosa woman, announced that Happy was actually of
                      Mixed-Race, or 'Colored' ... e issue of a romance between
                      her cousin and a White Zimbabwean shopkeeper.

                      A judge ordered DNA tests performed,
                      hoping for a scientific resolution of the matter

                      Meanwhile, a paint company began running
                      newspaper advertisements last weekend
                      with his photograph and the tagline:

                      "Any color you can think of" .

                      No matter what his true lineage,  Happy has come
                      to symbolize the intensity with which South Africans
                      still scrutinize matters of race - years after apartheid's
                      demise and despite real progress toward
                      building an integrated society.

                      Of course, under apartheid, Happy's case would
                      have been much more than a custody battle.

                      The court's decision on his race would have determined
                      where and with whom, as a White, Black or Colored
                      person, he could legally live, work and play.

                      Such formal barriers between the races
                      have now disappeared, but not their legacy.

                      Indeed, parsing the racial makeup of others

                      "has always nbeen a bizarre obsession in this society,"

                      said Graeme Simpson, executive director of
                      the Center for the Study of Violence and
                      Reconciliation, which studies racial attitudes

                      "Who you are and where you come from
                      completely dictated what you had access
                      to and what your place in society was".

                      To Blacks, especially those in the all-Black
                      township of Tweefontein , Happy's
                      accusation of having been enslaved
                      smacks of ingratitude.

                      "He should be grateful," said Martha Jiane,
                      a neighbor of the family that raised Happy
                      and the mother of one of his playmates.

                      "No one should have raised a White boy here,
                      paying his school fees and taking care of him.

                      Black people are poor, but as for White
                      people, all I know is that they are rich".

                      Happy, who the authorities believe is 16 years old, first
                      appeared in Tweefontein in 1990, in the company of Betty
                      Sindane, the daughter of a successful local farmer.

                      Koos Sindane, Betty's father, said he asked
                      his daughter where she had found this White boy.

                      "She said his mother had abandoned him,"
                      Mr. Sindane said, sitting in a shady spot
                      of the grassy courtyard of his home
                      "I felt sorry for him and treated him as one
                      of my grandsons even if he was a White".

                      Mr. Sindane said his daughter, who died last year,
                      told him she was in Johannesburg when a woman
                      named Rina asked her if she could watch the little
                      boy who was with her, whom she called Happy,
                      while Rina went to the liquor store Ms. Sindane
                      agreed, but Rina never returned.

                      Worried that his mother would miss
                      him, Ms. Sindane took the boy to a
                      police station and filed a report.

                      The police said she should take Happy
                      home and wait for them to call.

                      But they never did, and eventually Ms. Sindane
                      secured an affidavit that said Happy had been abandoned.

                      She informally adopted the boy, and eventually
                      brought him to her father's house.

                      Happy had a relatively normal boyhood in Tweefontein,
                      despite his physical differences from those around him.

                      But as the years passed, most of the people who
                      knew him simply forgot that he was different.

                      But Happy's attitude seemed to change when
                      Betty Sindane, whom he called his mother, died.

                      Friends said he was inconsolable,
                      often going to her grave to weep.

                      He felt very alone, Mr. Nkabinde said.

                      On May 19, Happy told his friend Petros
                      he was going to leave home for good.

                      He took a minibus to the police
                      station in Bronkhorstspruit.

                      Since his case became news, government officials
                      have kept Happy in protective custody.

                      Before being placed in the government's care, however,
                      he gave interviews to local newspapers in which
                      he said he simply wanted find his real family.

                      Today, government officials informed the Bothas and
                      another White couple that the results of Happy's DNA
                      tests showed that he could not be their son.

                      His link to Ms. Ben's family was inconclusive,
                      officials said, and more tests would be required.

                      The court hearing to establish Happy's legal
                      identity has been postponed to next month.

                      Mr. Simpson, of the Center for the Study of
                      Violence and Reconciliation, said the public's
                      interest in Happy Sindane reminded him of
                      nothing so much as the Population Registration
                      Act, the apartheid-era law under which people
                      were classified into RACIAL GROUPS.

                      It INCLUDED MORE THAN A DOZEN
                      VARIATIONS OF 'COLORED'.

                      "This just goes to show that you can rid the
                      Population Registration Act from the statute books,"
                      Mr. Simpson said, "but how deeply this is
                      ingrained in South African's view of each
                      other is incredibly powerful and symbolic
                      of the difficulty of changing a society. "

                      http://www.nytimes. com/2003/ 06/19/internatio nal/africa/ 19AFRI.html?ex=1106536834&ei=1&en=f9d642de24775826  

                    • j s
                      You know, all kidding aside, I think Brad may be Mixed - like octoroon or something - look at the bottom middle pic and his lips and nose etc. He s from the
                      Message 10 of 15 , Nov 21, 2006
                        You know, all kidding aside, I think Brad may be
                        Mixed - like octoroon or something - look at the
                        bottom middle pic and his lips and nose etc.

                        He's from the Midwest and that was
                        a notorious place for "passing".

                        multiracialbookclub <soaptalk@...> wrote:
                        LOLOL !!! That's great Jeff !!! :)

                        But ... now that I think about it .... hmmmmmmmm ...twins ...
                        separated at birth perhaps ... hhhhhmmmmmm :-? and, let's
                        face it, the name Happy Pitt does have sort of a ring to it!!!=D>


                        Go to fullsize image    Go to fullsize image  Go to fullsize image

                          Go to fullsize image    Go to fullsize image  Go to fullsize image

                        (But ... in all honesty ... some of their features
                        -- ex. nose -- really are rather strikingly similar)


                        BTW -- 'Gen-Mixed' family ... let's try to keep Brad in our
                        thoughts -- as apparently 'new-found fatherhood' has been a lot
                        harder on him, and taking a lot more of his time, than many people
                        realized .... and he's starting to let himself go  --- just a tad bit.
                          ;)

                        http://www.banane. be/images/ personnalites/ Brad_Pitt_ a_pris_du_ poids.jpg


                        j s <creolescience@ ...> wrote:


                        You know, he kind of looks like Brad Pitt - just dye the hair,
                        get him some hair grease and get him some contacts


                        multiracialbookclub
                        <soaptalk@hotmail. com>
                        wrote:


                        Listed below are some articles on the results of  the
                        rather `curious case' of a `Coloured' young person 
                        from South Africa by the name of `Happy Sindane'.


                        Happy Sindane

                        The one article that I found to be of particular
                        interest --- was found at the following link:

                        http://forum. mg.co.za/ showthreaded. php?Number= 80694


                        ************ ********* ********* ********* *****

                        THE CURIOUS CASE OF HAPPY SINDANE


                        ************ ********* ********* ********* *****

                        The Controversy:

                        http://reti. blogspot. com/2004/ 02/black- or-white. html

                        The Ruling:

                        http://www.freerepu blic.com/ focus/f-news/ 918541/posts
                        http://www.buzzle. com/editorials/ text7-16- 2003-42983. asp
                        http://www.buzzle. com/editorials/ text6-21- 2003-41993. asp

                        DNA tests on him and scores of putative
                        parents showed him to be a so-called
                        Coloured (a person of Mixed-Race) …


                        In October, magistrate Marthinus Kruger,
                        in Bronkhorstspruit, a rural town 75 miles
                        north-east of Johannesburg, said police
                        evidence suggested the youth was
                        the son of a German by his Black
                        domestic worker, Rina Mzayiya.

                        He had been abandoned at the age of six …
                        and brought up by another Black woman …



                        The youth, who is olive-skinned, became convinced
                        he was an abducted White boy when he saw the
                        photo of a missing White infant on television
                        .

                        http://www.sundayti mes.co.za/ 2003/07/20/ news/news11. asp
                        http://forum. mg.co.za/ showthreaded. php?Number= 80694

                        Related Links of Interest:
                        http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 71
                        http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 70

                        The Testing:
                        http://www.thestar. co.za/index. php?fSectionId= 129&fArticleId=153314
                        http://thescotsman. scotsman. com/s2.cfm? id=592152003

                        The Claims:
                        http://news. bbc.co.uk/ 1/hi/world/ africa/3047923. stm

                        The Media Exploitation:
                        http://www.witness. co.za/content/ 2003_06/16124. htm
                        http://wap.busrep. co.za/index. php?fSectionId= 129&fArticleId=188243



                        ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* *****

                        'Lost Boy' Shines Light on Race in South Africa"

                        ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* *****


                        (June 19, 2003 / By Lydia Polgreen
                        Bronkhorstpruit, South Africa, June 17) –

                        Happy Sindane was always an
                        oddity in Tweefontein township.

                        In a country where, almost a decade after the end of
                        apartheid, the races seldom live side by side, Happy's
                        blond head bobbed in a sea of tight black curls.

                        In soccer games, played on dusty fields by barefoot
                        boys with a homemade ball of plastic bags
                        and twine, his pale feet stood out.

                        Then, last month, Happy walked into a police
                        station in this sleepy town about 60 miles
                        northeast of Johannesburg.

                        Speaking in Ndebele, his only tongue, Happy,
                        now a teenager, told an officer that he was White
                        and had been kidnapped from his Afrikaner parents
                        by a family maid when he was a little boy.

                        The woman had taken him to a black township,
                        he said, where he was virtually enslaved
                        by the Black family that raised him.

                        Overnight, Happy was transformed from
                        a local curiosity into a national sensation

                        The Bronkhorstspruit police station was flooded
                        with callers claiming to be Happy's parents.

                        Jan and Sarie Botha, a poor White couple from Pretoria,
                        emerged as the most credible of the White claimants

                        But no sooner had they stepped forward than Tozi Ben,
                        a Xhosa woman, announced that Happy was actually of
                        Mixed-Race, or 'Colored' ... e issue of a romance between
                        her cousin and a White Zimbabwean shopkeeper.

                        A judge ordered DNA tests performed,
                        hoping for a scientific resolution of the matter

                        Meanwhile, a paint company began running
                        newspaper advertisements last weekend
                        with his photograph and the tagline:

                        "Any color you can think of" .

                        No matter what his true lineage,  Happy has come
                        to symbolize the intensity with which South Africans
                        still scrutinize matters of race - years after apartheid's
                        demise and despite real progress toward
                        building an integrated society.

                        Of course, under apartheid, Happy's case would
                        have been much more than a custody battle.

                        The court's decision on his race would have determined
                        where and with whom, as a White, Black or Colored
                        person, he could legally live, work and play.

                        Such formal barriers between the races
                        have now disappeared, but not their legacy.

                        Indeed, parsing the racial makeup of others

                        "has always nbeen a bizarre obsession in this society,"

                        said Graeme Simpson, executive director of
                        the Center for the Study of Violence and
                        Reconciliation, which studies racial attitudes

                        "Who you are and where you come from
                        completely dictated what you had access
                        to and what your place in society was".

                        To Blacks, especially those in the all-Black
                        township of Tweefontein, Happy's
                        accusation of having been enslaved
                        smacks of ingratitude.

                        "He should be grateful," said Martha Jiane,
                        a neighbor of the family that raised Happy
                        and the mother of one of his playmates.

                        "No one should have raised a White boy here,
                        paying his school fees and taking care of him.

                        Black people are poor, but as for White
                        people, all I know is that they are rich".

                        Happy, who the authorities believe is 16 years old, first
                        appeared in Tweefontein in 1990, in the company of Betty
                        Sindane, the daughter of a successful local farmer.

                        Koos Sindane, Betty's father, said he asked
                        his daughter where she had found this White boy.

                        "She said his mother had abandoned him,"
                        Mr. Sindane said, sitting in a shady spot
                        of the grassy courtyard of his home
                        "I felt sorry for him and treated him as one
                        of my grandsons even if he was a White".

                        Mr. Sindane said his daughter, who died last year,
                        told him she was in Johannesburg when a woman
                        named Rina asked her if she could watch the little
                        boy who was with her, whom she called Happy,
                        while Rina went to the liquor store Ms. Sindane
                        agreed, but Rina never returned.

                        Worried that his mother would miss
                        him, Ms. Sindane took the boy to a
                        police station and filed a report.

                        The police said she should take Happy
                        home and wait for them to call.

                        But they never did, and eventually Ms. Sindane
                        secured an affidavit that said Happy had been abandoned.

                        She informally adopted the boy, and eventually
                        brought him to her father's house.

                        Happy had a relatively normal boyhood in Tweefontein,
                        despite his physical differences from those around him.

                        But as the years passed, most of the people who
                        knew him simply forgot that he was different.

                        But Happy's attitude seemed to change when
                        Betty Sindane, whom he called his mother, died.

                        Friends said he was inconsolable,
                        often going to her grave to weep.

                        He felt very alone, Mr. Nkabinde said.

                        On May 19, Happy told his friend Petros
                        he was going to leave home for good.

                        He took a minibus to the police
                        station in Bronkhorstspruit.

                        Since his case became news, government officials
                        have kept Happy in protective custody.

                        Before being placed in the government's care, however,
                        he gave interviews to local newspapers in which
                        he said he simply wanted find his real family.

                        Today, government officials informed the Bothas and
                        another White couple that the results of Happy's DNA
                        tests showed that he could not be their son.

                        His link to Ms. Ben's family was inconclusive,
                        officials said, and more tests would be required.

                        The court hearing to establish Happy's legal
                        identity has been postponed to next month.

                        Mr. Simpson, of the Center for the Study of
                        Violence and Reconciliation, said the public's
                        interest in Happy Sindane reminded him of
                        nothing so much as the Population Registration
                        Act, the apartheid-era law under which people
                        were classified into RACIAL GROUPS.

                        It INCLUDED MORE THAN A DOZEN
                        VARIATIONS OF 'COLORED'.

                        "This just goes to show that you can rid the
                        Population Registration Act from the statute books,"
                        Mr. Simpson said, "but how deeply this is
                        ingrained in South African's view of each
                        other is incredibly powerful and symbolic
                        of the difficulty of changing a society. "

                        http://www.nytimes. com/2003/ 06/19/internatio nal/africa/ 19AFRI.html?ex=1106536834&ei=1&en=f9d642de24775826  

                      • multiracialbookclub
                        Jeff -- Yahoo!Groups Administration won t store the photo inside the post. [:(] (This new precautionary or space saving thing or whatever they are doing is
                        Message 11 of 15 , Nov 21, 2006

                          Jeff -- Yahoo!Groups Administration
                          won't "store" the photo inside the post. :(


                          (This new precautionary or space saving thing
                          or whatever they are doing is so very annoying)8-|

                          Would you mind saving a copy of it
                          in the 'Photo's' section -- and then
                          re-sending your post with a link to it?;;)


                          You have  absolutely got to share this
                          photo with everyone -- it's hysterical!! :D


                          j s <creolescience@...> wrote:


                          Here it is, with a little help from Photoshop

                          [[NOTE: Picture is at bottom of page]]



                          j s <creolescience@...> wrote:


                          You know, he kind of looks like Brad Pitt - just dye the
                          hair, get him some hair grease and get him some contacts


                          multiracialbookclub
                          <soaptalk@hotmail. com>
                          wrote:

                          Listed below are some articles on the results of  the
                          rather `curious case' of a `Coloured' young person 
                          from South Africa by the name of `Happy Sindane'.


                          Happy Sindane

                          The one article that I found to be of particular
                          interest --- was found at the following link:

                          http://forum. mg.co.za/ showthreaded. php?Number= 80694


                          ************ ********* ********* *********

                          THE CURIOUS CASE OF HAPPY SINDANE


                          ************ ********* ********* ********* *

                          The Controversy:

                          http://reti. blogspot. com/2004/ 02/black- or-white. html

                          The Ruling:

                          http://www.freerepu blic.com/ focus/f-news/ 918541/posts
                          http://www.buzzle. com/editorials/ text7-16- 2003-42983. asp
                          http://www.buzzle. com/editorials/ text6-21- 2003-41993. asp

                          DNA tests on him and scores of putative
                          parents showed him to be a so-called
                          Coloured (a person of Mixed-Race) …


                          In October, magistrate Marthinus Kruger,
                          in Bronkhorstspruit, a rural town 75 miles
                          north-east of Johannesburg, said police
                          evidence suggested the youth was
                          the son of a German by his Black
                          domestic worker, Rina Mzayiya.

                          He had been abandoned at the age of six …
                          and brought up by another Black woman …



                          The youth, who is olive-skinned, became
                          convinced he was an abducted White boy
                          when he saw the photo of a missing
                          White infant on television
                          .

                          http://www.sundayti mes.co.za/ 2003/07/20/ news/news11. asp
                          http://forum. mg.co.za/ showthreaded. php?Number= 80694

                          Related Links of Interest:
                          http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 71
                          http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 70

                          The Testing:
                          http://www.thestar. co.za/index. php?fSectionId= 129&fArticleId=153314
                          http://thescotsman. scotsman. com/s2.cfm? id=592152003

                          The Claims:
                          http://news. bbc.co.uk/ 1/hi/world/ africa/3047923. stm

                          The Media Exploitation:
                          http://www.witness. co.za/content/ 2003_06/16124. htm
                          http://wap.busrep. co.za/index. php?fSectionId= 129&fArticleId=188243


                          ************ ********* ************ *****

                          'Lost Boy' Shines Light on Race in South Africa"

                          ************ ********* ********* ********


                          (June 19, 2003 / By Lydia Polgreen
                          Bronkhorstpruit, South Africa, June 17) –

                          Happy Sindane was always an
                          oddity in Tweefontein township.

                          In a country where, almost a decade after the end of
                          apartheid, the races seldom live side by side, Happy's
                          blond head bobbed in a sea of tight black curls.

                          In soccer games, played on dusty fields by barefoot
                          boys with a homemade ball of plastic bags
                          and twine, his pale feet stood out.

                          Then, last month, Happy walked into a police
                          station in this sleepy town about 60 miles
                          northeast of Johannesburg.

                          Speaking in Ndebele, his only tongue, Happy,
                          now a teenager, told an officer that he was White
                          and had been kidnapped from his Afrikaner parents
                          by a family maid when he was a little boy.

                          The woman had taken him to a black township,
                          he said, where he was virtually enslaved
                          by the Black family that raised him.

                          Overnight, Happy was transformed from
                          a local curiosity into a national sensation

                          The Bronkhorstspruit police station was flooded
                          with callers claiming to be Happy's parents.

                          Jan and Sarie Botha, a poor White couple from Pretoria,
                          emerged as the most credible of the White claimants

                          But no sooner had they stepped forward than Tozi Ben,
                          a Xhosa woman, announced that Happy was actually of
                          Mixed-Race, or 'Colored' ... e issue of a romance between
                          her cousin and a White Zimbabwean shopkeeper.

                          A judge ordered DNA tests performed,
                          hoping for a scientific resolution of the matter

                          Meanwhile, a paint company began running
                          newspaper advertisements last weekend
                          with his photograph and the tagline:

                          "Any color you can think of" .

                          No matter what his true lineage,  Happy has come
                          to symbolize the intensity with which South Africans
                          still scrutinize matters of race - years after apartheid's
                          demise and despite real progress toward
                          building an integrated society.

                          Of course, under apartheid, Happy's case would
                          have been much more than a custody battle.

                          The court's decision on his race would
                          have determined where and with whom,
                          as a White, Black or Colored person,
                          he could legally live, work and play.

                          Such formal barriers between the races
                          have now disappeared, but not their legacy.

                          Indeed, parsing the racial makeup of others

                          "has always nbeen a bizarre obsession in this society,"

                          said Graeme Simpson, executive director of
                          the Center for the Study of Violence and
                          Reconciliation, which studies racial attitudes

                          "Who you are and where you come from
                          completely dictated what you had access
                          to and what your place in society was".

                          To Blacks, especially those in the
                          all-Black township of Tweefontein,
                          Happy'saccusation of having been
                          enslaved smacks of ingratitude.

                          "He should be grateful," said Martha Jiane,
                          a neighbor of the family that raised Happy
                          and the mother of one of his playmates.

                          "No one should have raised a White boy here,
                          paying his school fees and taking care of him.

                          Black people are poor, but as for White
                          people, all I know is that they are rich".

                          Happy, who the authorities believe is 16 years
                          old, first appeared in Tweefontein in 1990,
                          in the company of Betty Sindane, the
                          daughter of a successful local farmer.

                          Koos Sindane, Betty's father, said he asked
                          his daughter where she had found this White boy.

                          "She said his mother had abandoned him,"
                          Mr. Sindane said, sitting in a shady spot
                          of the grassy courtyard of his home
                          "I felt sorry for him and treated him as one
                          of my grandsons even if he was a White".

                          Mr. Sindane said his daughter, who died last year,
                          told him she was in Johannesburg when a woman
                          named Rina asked her if she could watch the little
                          boy who was with her, whom she called Happy,
                          while Rina went to the liquor store Ms. Sindane
                          agreed, but Rina never returned.

                          Worried that his mother would miss
                          him, Ms. Sindane took the boy to a
                          police station and filed a report.

                          The police said she should take Happy
                          home and wait for them to call.

                          But they never did, and eventually
                          Ms. Sindane secured an affidavit
                          that said Happy had been abandoned.

                          She informally adopted the boy, and eventually
                          brought him to her father's house.

                          Happy had a relatively normal boyhood in Tweefontein,
                          despite his physical differences from those around him.

                          But as the years passed, most of the people who
                          knew him simply forgot that he was different.

                          But Happy's attitude seemed to change when
                          Betty Sindane, whom he called his mother, died.

                          Friends said he was inconsolable,
                          often going to her grave to weep.

                          He felt very alone, Mr. Nkabinde said.

                          On May 19, Happy told his friend Petros
                          he was going to leave home for good.

                          He took a minibus to the police
                          station in Bronkhorstspruit.

                          Since his case became news, government officials
                          have kept Happy in protective custody.

                          Before being placed in the government's care,
                          however, he gave interviews to local newspapers
                          in which he said he simply wanted find his real family.

                          Today, government officials informed the Bothas and
                          another White couple that the results of Happy's DNA
                          tests showed that he could not be their son.

                          His link to Ms. Ben's family was inconclusive,
                          officials said, and more tests would be required.

                          The court hearing to establish Happy's legal
                          identity has been postponed to next month.

                          Mr. Simpson, of the Center for the Study of
                          Violence and Reconciliation, said the public's
                          interest in Happy Sindane reminded him of
                          nothing so much as the Population Registration
                          Act, the apartheid-era law under which people
                          were classified into RACIAL GROUPS.

                          It INCLUDED MORE THAN A DOZEN
                          VARIATIONS OF 'COLORED'.

                          "This just goes to show that you can rid the
                          Population Registration Act from the statute books,"
                          Mr. Simpson said, "but how deeply this is
                          ingrained in South African's view of each
                          other is incredibly powerful and symbolic
                          of the difficulty of changing a society. "

                          http://www.nytimes. com/2003/ 06/19/internatio nal/africa/ 19AFRI.html?ex=1106536834&ei=1&en=f9d642de24775826  
                          Attachment(not stored)
                          brad_pitt_10.jpg
                          Type:
                          image/pjpeg
                        • j s
                          You have no idea ;) tlbaker1 wrote: You re insane, LOLOLOL!!! just dye the hair, get him some hair grease and get him some contacts Lynne
                          Message 12 of 15 , Nov 21, 2006
                            You have no idea ;)

                            tlbaker1 <tlbaker1@...> wrote:
                            You're insane, LOLOLOL!!!

                            just dye the hair, get him some hair grease and get him some contacts


                            Lynne



                            From: Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com
                            [mailto: Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com ]
                            On Behalf Of
                            j s
                            Sent: Tuesday, November 21, 2006 3:38 PM
                            To: Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com
                            Subject: Re: The 'Results' of the 'Curious' Case of Happy Sindane


                            You know, he kind of looks like Brad Pitt - just dye the
                            hair, get him some hair grease and get him some contacts


                            multiracialbookclub <soaptalk@hotmail. com> wrote:


                            Listed below are some articles on the results of  the
                            rather `curious case' of a `Coloured' young person 
                            from South Africa by the name of `Happy Sindane'.


                            Happy Sindane

                            The one article that I found to be of particular
                            interest --- was found at the following link:

                            http://forum. mg.co.za/ showthreaded. php?Number= 80694


                            ************ ********* ********* ********* *****

                            THE CURIOUS CASE OF HAPPY SINDANE

                            ************ ********* ********* ********* *****

                            The Controversy:

                            http://reti. blogspot. com/2004/ 02/black- or-white. html

                            The Ruling:

                            http://www.freerepu blic.com/ focus/f-news/ 918541/posts
                            http://www.buzzle. com/editorials/ text7-16- 2003-42983. asp
                            http://www.buzzle. com/editorials/ text6-21- 2003-41993. asp

                            DNA tests on him and scores of putative
                            parents showed him to be a so-called
                            Coloured (a person of Mixed-Race) …


                            In October, magistrate Marthinus Kruger,
                            in Bronkhorstspruit, a rural town 75 miles
                            north-east of Johannesburg , said police
                            evidence suggested the youth was
                            the son of a German by his Black
                            domestic worker, Rina Mzayiya.

                            He had been abandoned at the age of six …
                            and brought up by another Black woman …



                            The youth, who is olive-skinned, became convinced
                            he was an abducted White boy when he saw the
                            photo of a missing White infant on television
                            .
                            http://www.sundayti mes.co.za/ 2003/07/20/ news/news11. asp
                            http://forum. mg.co.za/ showthreaded. php?Number= 80694

                            Related Links of Interest:
                            http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 71
                            http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 70

                            The Testing:
                            http://www.thestar. co.za/index. php?fSectionId= 129&fArticleId=153314
                            http://thescotsman. scotsman. com/s2.cfm? id=592152003

                            The Claims:
                            http://news. bbc.co.uk/ 1/hi/world/ africa/3047923. stm

                            The Media Exploitation:
                            http://www.witness. co.za/content/ 2003_06/16124. htm
                            http://wap.busrep. co.za/index. php?fSectionId= 129&fArticleId=188243



                            ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* *****

                            'Lost Boy' Shines Light on Race in South Africa "

                            ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* *****


                            (June 19, 2003 / By Lydia Polgreen
                            Bronkhorstpruit , South Africa , June 17) –

                            Happy Sindane was always an
                            oddity in Tweefontein township.

                            In a country where, almost a decade after the end of
                            apartheid, the races seldom live side by side, Happy's
                            blond head bobbed in a sea of tight black curls.

                            In soccer games, played on dusty fields by barefoot
                            boys with a homemade ball of plastic bags
                            and twine, his pale feet stood out.

                            Then, last month, Happy walked into a police
                            station in this sleepy town about 60 miles
                            northeast of Johannesburg .

                            Speaking in Ndebele, his only tongue, Happy,
                            now a teenager, told an officer that he was White
                            and had been kidnapped from his Afrikaner parents
                            by a family maid when he was a little boy.

                            The woman had taken him to a black township,
                            he said, where he was virtually enslaved
                            by the Black family that raised him.

                            Overnight, Happy was transformed from
                            a local curiosity into a national sensation

                            The Bronkhorstspruit police station was flooded
                            with callers claiming to be Happy's parents.

                            Jan and Sarie Botha, a poor White couple from Pretoria ,
                            emerged as the most credible of the White claimants

                            But no sooner had they stepped forward than Tozi Ben,
                            a Xhosa woman, announced that Happy was actually of
                            Mixed-Race, or 'Colored' ... e issue of a romance between
                            her cousin and a White Zimbabwean shopkeeper.

                            A judge ordered DNA tests performed,
                            hoping for a scientific resolution of the matter

                            Meanwhile, a paint company began running
                            newspaper advertisements last weekend
                            with his photograph and the tagline:

                            "Any color you can think of" .

                            No matter what his true lineage,  Happy has come
                            to symbolize the intensity with which South Africans
                            still scrutinize matters of race - years after apartheid's
                            demise and despite real progress toward
                            building an integrated society.

                            Of course, under apartheid, Happy's case would
                            have been much more than a custody battle.

                            The court's decision on his race would have determined
                            where and with whom, as a White, Black or Colored
                            person, he could legally live, work and play.

                            Such formal barriers between the races
                            have now disappeared, but not their legacy.

                            Indeed, parsing the racial makeup of others

                            "has always nbeen a bizarre obsession in this society,"

                            said Graeme Simpson, executive director of
                            the Center for the Study of Violence and
                            Reconciliation, which studies racial attitudes

                            "Who you are and where you come from
                            completely dictated what you had access
                            to and what your place in society was".

                            To Blacks, especially those in the all-Black
                            township of Tweefontein , Happy's
                            accusation of having been enslaved
                            smacks of ingratitude.

                            "He should be grateful," said Martha Jiane,
                            a neighbor of the family that raised Happy
                            and the mother of one of his playmates.

                            "No one should have raised a White boy here,
                            paying his school fees and taking care of him.

                            Black people are poor, but as for White
                            people, all I know is that they are rich".

                            Happy, who the authorities believe is 16 years old, first
                            appeared in Tweefontein in 1990, in the company of Betty
                            Sindane, the daughter of a successful local farmer.

                            Koos Sindane, Betty's father, said he asked
                            his daughter where she had found this White boy.

                            "She said his mother had abandoned him,"
                            Mr. Sindane said, sitting in a shady spot
                            of the grassy courtyard of his home
                            "I felt sorry for him and treated him as one
                            of my grandsons even if he was a White".

                            Mr. Sindane said his daughter, who died last year,
                            told him she was in Johannesburg when a woman
                            named Rina asked her if she could watch the little
                            boy who was with her, whom she called Happy,
                            while Rina went to the liquor store Ms. Sindane
                            agreed, but Rina never returned.

                            Worried that his mother would miss
                            him, Ms. Sindane took the boy to a
                            police station and filed a report.

                            The police said she should take Happy
                            home and wait for them to call.

                            But they never did, and eventually Ms. Sindane
                            secured an affidavit that said Happy had been abandoned.

                            She informally adopted the boy, and eventually
                            brought him to her father's house.

                            Happy had a relatively normal boyhood in Tweefontein,
                            despite his physical differences from those around him.

                            But as the years passed, most of the people who
                            knew him simply forgot that he was different.

                            But Happy's attitude seemed to change when
                            Betty Sindane, whom he called his mother, died.

                            Friends said he was inconsolable,
                            often going to her grave to weep.

                            He felt very alone, Mr. Nkabinde said.

                            On May 19, Happy told his friend Petros
                            he was going to leave home for good.

                            He took a minibus to the police
                            station in Bronkhorstspruit.

                            Since his case became news, government officials
                            have kept Happy in protective custody.

                            Before being placed in the government's care, however,
                            he gave interviews to local newspapers in which
                            he said he simply wanted find his real family.

                            Today, government officials informed the Bothas and
                            another White couple that the results of Happy's DNA
                            tests showed that he could not be their son.

                            His link to Ms. Ben's family was inconclusive,
                            officials said, and more tests would be required.

                            The court hearing to establish Happy's legal
                            identity has been postponed to next month.

                            Mr. Simpson, of the Center for the Study of
                            Violence and Reconciliation, said the public's
                            interest in Happy Sindane reminded him of
                            nothing so much as the Population Registration
                            Act, the apartheid-era law under which people
                            were classified into RACIAL GROUPS.

                            It INCLUDED MORE THAN A DOZEN
                            VARIATIONS OF 'COLORED'.

                            "This just goes to show that you can rid the
                            Population Registration Act from the statute books,"
                            Mr. Simpson said, "but how deeply this is
                            ingrained in South African's view of each
                            other is incredibly powerful and symbolic
                            of the difficulty of changing a society. "

                            http://www.nytimes. com/2003/ 06/19/internatio nal/africa/ 19AFRI.html?ex=1106536834&ei=1&en=f9d642de24775826  
                             





                            Sponsored Link

                            Mortgage rates near 39yr lows. $510,000 Mortgage for $1,698/mo - Calculate new house payment

                          • tlbaker1
                            always a possibility, you could always do some research and then an expose in one of the rag sheet newspapers, LOLOLOL!!!! You will be RICH or sued for
                            Message 13 of 15 , Nov 22, 2006

                              always a possibility, you could always do some research and
                              then an expose in one of the rag sheet newspapers, LOLOLOL!!!!
                              You will be RICH or sued for ... "slander"...

                               

                              Lynne

                               


                              From: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
                              [mailto: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com ]
                              On Behalf Of
                              j s
                              Sent: Tuesday, November 21, 2006 10:22 PM
                              To: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: The 'Results' of the 'Curious' Case of Happy Sindane

                               

                              You know, all kidding aside, I think Brad may be
                              Mixed - like octoroon or something - look at the
                              bottom middle pic and his lips and nose etc.

                              He's from the Midwest and that was
                              a notorious place for "passing".


                              multiracialbookclub <soaptalk@...>
                              wrote:

                              LOLOL !!! That's great Jeff !!! :)

                              But ... now that I think about it .... hmmmmmmmm ...twins ...
                              separated at birth perhaps ... hhhhhmmmmmm :-? and, let's
                              face it, the name Happy Pitt does have sort of a ring to it!!!=D>


                              Go to fullsize image    Go to fullsize image  Go to fullsize image

                                Go to fullsize image    Go to fullsize image  Go to fullsize image

                              (But ... in all honesty ... some of their features
                              -- ex. nose -- really are rather strikingly similar)


                              BTW -- 'Gen-Mixed' family ... let's try to keep Brad in our
                              thoughts -- as apparently 'new-found fatherhood' has been a lot
                              harder on him, and taking a lot more of his time, than many people
                              realized .... and he's starting to let himself go  --- just a tad bit.
                                ;)

                              http://www.banane. be/images/ personnalites/ Brad_Pitt_ a_pris_du_ poids.jpg


                              j s <creolescience@ ...> wrote:


                              You know, he kind of looks like Brad Pitt - just dye the hair,
                              get him some hair grease and get him some contacts


                              multiracialbookclub
                              <soaptalk@hotmail. com>
                              wrote:


                              Listed below are some articles on the results of  the
                              rather `curious case' of a `Coloured' young person 
                              from South Africa by the name of `Happy Sindane'.


                              Happy Sindane

                              The one article that I found to be of particular
                              interest --- was found at the following link:

                              http://forum. mg.co.za/ showthreaded. php?Number= 80694


                              ************ ********* ********* ********* *****

                              THE CURIOUS CASE OF HAPPY SINDANE

                              ************ ********* ********* ********* *****

                              The Controversy:

                              http://reti. blogspot. com/2004/ 02/black- or-white. html

                              The Ruling:

                              http://www.freerepu blic.com/ focus/f-news/ 918541/posts
                              http://www.buzzle. com/editorials/ text7-16- 2003-42983. asp
                              http://www.buzzle. com/editorials/ text6-21- 2003-41993. asp

                              DNA tests on him and scores of putative
                              parents showed him to be a so-called
                              Coloured (a person of Mixed-Race) …


                              In October, magistrate Marthinus Kruger,
                              in Bronkhorstspruit, a rural town 75 miles
                              north-east of Johannesburg , said police
                              evidence suggested the youth was
                              the son of a German by his Black
                              domestic worker, Rina Mzayiya.

                              He had been abandoned at the age of six …
                              and brought up by another Black woman …



                              The youth, who is olive-skinned, became convinced
                              he was an abducted White boy when he saw the
                              photo of a missing White infant on television
                              .
                              http://www.sundayti mes.co.za/ 2003/07/20/ news/news11. asp
                              http://forum. mg.co.za/ showthreaded. php?Number= 80694

                              Related Links of Interest:
                              http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 71
                              http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 70

                              The Testing:
                              http://www.thestar. co.za/index. php?fSectionId= 129&fArticleId=153314
                              http://thescotsman. scotsman. com/s2.cfm? id=592152003

                              The Claims:
                              http://news. bbc.co.uk/ 1/hi/world/ africa/3047923. stm

                              The Media Exploitation:
                              http://www.witness. co.za/content/ 2003_06/16124. htm
                              http://wap.busrep. co.za/index. php?fSectionId= 129&fArticleId=188243



                              ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* *****

                              'Lost Boy' Shines Light on Race in South Africa "

                              ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* *****


                              (June 19, 2003 / By Lydia Polgreen
                              Bronkhorstpruit , South Africa , June 17) –

                              Happy Sindane was always an
                              oddity in Tweefontein township.

                              In a country where, almost a decade after the end of
                              apartheid, the races seldom live side by side, Happy's
                              blond head bobbed in a sea of tight black curls.

                              In soccer games, played on dusty fields by barefoot
                              boys with a homemade ball of plastic bags
                              and twine, his pale feet stood out.

                              Then, last month, Happy walked into a police
                              station in this sleepy town about 60 miles
                              northeast of Johannesburg .

                              Speaking in Ndebele, his only tongue, Happy,
                              now a teenager, told an officer that he was White
                              and had been kidnapped from his Afrikaner parents
                              by a family maid when he was a little boy.

                              The woman had taken him to a black township,
                              he said, where he was virtually enslaved
                              by the Black family that raised him.

                              Overnight, Happy was transformed from
                              a local curiosity into a national sensation

                              The Bronkhorstspruit police station was flooded
                              with callers claiming to be Happy's parents.

                              Jan and Sarie Botha, a poor White couple from Pretoria ,
                              emerged as the most credible of the White claimants

                              But no sooner had they stepped forward than Tozi Ben,
                              a Xhosa woman, announced that Happy was actually of
                              Mixed-Race, or 'Colored' ... e issue of a romance between
                              her cousin and a White Zimbabwean shopkeeper.

                              A judge ordered DNA tests performed,
                              hoping for a scientific resolution of the matter

                              Meanwhile, a paint company began running
                              newspaper advertisements last weekend
                              with his photograph and the tagline:

                              "Any color you can think of" .

                              No matter what his true lineage,  Happy has come
                              to symbolize the intensity with which South Africans
                              still scrutinize matters of race - years after apartheid's
                              demise and despite real progress toward
                              building an integrated society.

                              Of course, under apartheid, Happy's case would
                              have been much more than a custody battle.

                              The court's decision on his race would have determined
                              where and with whom, as a White, Black or Colored
                              person, he could legally live, work and play.

                              Such formal barriers between the races
                              have now disappeared, but not their legacy.

                              Indeed, parsing the racial makeup of others

                              "has always nbeen a bizarre obsession in this society,"

                              said Graeme Simpson, executive director of
                              the Center for the Study of Violence and
                              Reconciliation, which studies racial attitudes

                              "Who you are and where you come from
                              completely dictated what you had access
                              to and what your place in society was".

                              To Blacks, especially those in the all-Black
                              township of Tweefontein , Happy's
                              accusation of having been enslaved
                              smacks of ingratitude.

                              "He should be grateful," said Martha Jiane,
                              a neighbor of the family that raised Happy
                              and the mother of one of his playmates.

                              "No one should have raised a White boy here,
                              paying his school fees and taking care of him.

                              Black people are poor, but as for White
                              people, all I know is that they are rich".

                              Happy, who the authorities believe is 16 years old, first
                              appeared in Tweefontein in 1990, in the company of Betty
                              Sindane, the daughter of a successful local farmer.

                              Koos Sindane, Betty's father, said he asked
                              his daughter where she had found this White boy.

                              "She said his mother had abandoned him,"
                              Mr. Sindane said, sitting in a shady spot
                              of the grassy courtyard of his home
                              "I felt sorry for him and treated him as one
                              of my grandsons even if he was a White".

                              Mr. Sindane said his daughter, who died last year,
                              told him she was in Johannesburg when a woman
                              named Rina asked her if she could watch the little
                              boy who was with her, whom she called Happy,
                              while Rina went to the liquor store Ms. Sindane
                              agreed, but Rina never returned.

                              Worried that his mother would miss
                              him, Ms. Sindane took the boy to a
                              police station and filed a report.

                              The police said she should take Happy
                              home and wait for them to call.

                              But they never did, and eventually Ms. Sindane
                              secured an affidavit that said Happy had been abandoned.

                              She informally adopted the boy, and eventually
                              brought him to her father's house.

                              Happy had a relatively normal boyhood in Tweefontein,
                              despite his physical differences from those around him.

                              But as the years passed, most of the people who
                              knew him simply forgot that he was different.

                              But Happy's attitude seemed to change when
                              Betty Sindane, whom he called his mother, died.

                              Friends said he was inconsolable,
                              often going to her grave to weep.

                              He felt very alone, Mr. Nkabinde said.

                              On May 19, Happy told his friend Petros
                              he was going to leave home for good.

                              He took a minibus to the police
                              station in Bronkhorstspruit.

                              Since his case became news, government officials
                              have kept Happy in protective custody.

                              Before being placed in the government's care, however,
                              he gave interviews to local newspapers in which
                              he said he simply wanted find his real family.

                              Today, government officials informed the Bothas and
                              another White couple that the results of Happy's DNA
                              tests showed that he could not be their son.

                              His link to Ms. Ben's family was inconclusive,
                              officials said, and more tests would be required.

                              The court hearing to establish Happy's legal
                              identity has been postponed to next month.

                              Mr. Simpson, of the Center for the Study of
                              Violence and Reconciliation, said the public's
                              interest in Happy Sindane reminded him of
                              nothing so much as the Population Registration
                              Act, the apartheid-era law under which people
                              were classified into RACIAL GROUPS.

                              It INCLUDED MORE THAN A DOZEN
                              VARIATIONS OF 'COLORED'.

                              "This just goes to show that you can rid the
                              Population Registration Act from the statute books,"
                              Mr. Simpson said, "but how deeply this is
                              ingrained in South African's view of each
                              other is incredibly powerful and symbolic
                              of the difficulty of changing a society. "

                              http://www.nytimes. com/2003/ 06/19/internatio nal/africa/ 19AFRI.html?ex=1106536834&ei=1&en=f9d642de24775826  


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