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Ralph Ellison and “The Educated, Articulate, Self-Aware” ‘Invisible Man’

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  • multiracialbookclub
    Soon after his move to New York in 1936, his book reviews, short stories, and articles began to appear in numerous magazines and anthologies, and Ellison was
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 30, 2005
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      "Soon after his move to New York in 1936, his book
      reviews, short stories, and articles began to appear
      in numerous magazines and anthologies, and Ellison
      was on his way to becoming an acclaimed author.

      Ellison described `Invisible Man', published in 1952,
      as "a novel about innocence and human error,
      a struggle through illusion to reality."

      Ellison claimed that his novel comprised
      "a series of reversals," providing a
      "portrait of the artist as rabble-rouser."

      Responding to questions concerning the
      narrator's journey as a reflection of the
      "black" struggle for justice and equality,
      Ellison contended that "there is
      "no dichotomy between art and protest".

      To illustrate, he cited works such as Cervantes' `Don
      Quixote'and Dostoyevski's `Notes from Underground',
      arguing that these literary works not only embody
      protest against social and political constraints,
      but ultimately protest against the
      limitations of human life itself.

      http://education.yahoo.com/homework_help/cliffsnotes/invisible_man/2.html
      http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/database/ellison_r.html
      http://www.uncp.edu/home/canada/work/allam/1914-/lit/ellison.htm

      http://partners.nytimes.com/library/magazine/home/19990523mag-feeley.html
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