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The "Coloureds" of South Africa

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  • multiracialbookclub
    The Coloureds do not have one racial identity. They form a number of racially and culturally distinct groups and were legally considered a separate group
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 28, 2005
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      The "Coloureds" do not have one racial identity.
      They form a number of racially and culturally distinct
      groups and were legally considered a separate group
      under Apartheid's racial classification legislation

      In the 1950s and 1960s, laws ... attempted to
      make the "Coloureds" appear to be far more of one
      identifiable ethnic group than they are in reality.

      Indeed, many sub-classifications were required in the law to
      include all those that the government categorised Coloured.

      The Apartheid bureaucracy devised complex (and often arbitrary)
      criteria at the time that the Population Registration Act was
      implemented to determine who was Coloured.

      Minor officials would administer tests such as the
      pencil test (testing the curliness of hair) to determine if someone
      should be categorised Coloured or Black, or Coloured or White.

      ---Different members of the same family found
      themselves in different race groups ---


      Further test detemined membership of the
      various sub-racial groups of the "Coloureds".

      http://dirs.org/wiki-article-tab.cfm/coloured
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/101
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/93
    • j s
      there s a website called bruin-ou.com that is for mixed South Africans. multiracialbookclub wrote:The Coloureds do not have one racial
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 8, 2005
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        there's a website called bruin-ou.com that is for mixed South Africans.

        multiracialbookclub <soaptalk@...> wrote:

        The "Coloureds" do not have one racial identity.
        They form a number of racially and culturally distinct
        groups and were legally considered a separate group
        under Apartheid's racial classification legislation

        In the 1950s and 1960s, laws ...  attempted to
        make the "Coloureds" appear to be far more of one
        identifiable ethnic group than they are in reality.

        Indeed, many sub-classifications were required in the law to
        include all those that the government categorised Coloured.

        The Apartheid bureaucracy devised complex (and often arbitrary)
        criteria at the time that the Population Registration Act was
        implemented to determine who was Coloured.

        Minor officials would administer tests such as the
        pencil test (testing the curliness of hair) to determine if someone
        should be categorised Coloured or Black, or Coloured or White.

        ---Different members of the same family found
        themselves in different race groups ---


        Further test detemined membership of the
        various sub-racial groups of the "Coloureds".

        http://dirs.org/wiki-article-tab.cfm/coloured
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/101
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/93


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      • quallagirl
        I know I am late replying but I just caught this. I have met some coloureds several years ago when I worked at Sears . I was basically showing them around
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 22, 2005
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          I know I am late replying but I just caught this.  I have met some coloureds several years ago when I worked at  Sears .  I was basically showing them around the store .  Anyway, there was this older lady I was talking to and asked her were she was from.  She then told me that she was from South Africa.  From the looks of her and her family, you could tell they were multi-racial.  I think I may have asked her if they were coloured and she told me yes.  After that,  I asked her if I would be considered the same over in Africa and she told me yes.  I didn't even tell her my racial background.  It's interesting because over here, I am considered black.  It does depend on were a person is from to be coonsidered something totally different in that society. 
           
          Tonya

          multiracialbookclub <soaptalk@...> wrote:
          The "Coloureds" do not have one racial identity.
          They form a number of racially and culturally distinct
          groups and were legally considered a separate group
          under Apartheid's racial classification legislation

          In the 1950s and 1960s, laws ...  attempted to
          make the "Coloureds" appear to be far more of one
          identifiable ethnic group than they are in reality.

          Indeed, many sub-classifications were required in the law to
          include all those that the government categorised Coloured.

          The Apartheid bureaucracy devised complex (and often arbitrary)
          criteria at the time that the Population Registration Act was
          implemented to determine who was Coloured.

          Minor officials would administer tests such as the
          pencil test (testing the curliness of hair) to determine if someone
          should be categorised Coloured or Black, or Coloured or White.

          ---Different members of the same family found
          themselves in different race groups ---


          Further test detemined membership of the
          various sub-racial groups of the "Coloureds".

          http://dirs.org/wiki-article-tab.cfm/coloured
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/101
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/93



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        • multiracialbookclub
          You make a really good point here!! Thanks for sharing this, Tonya!! :D (Related link: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/732) quallagirl
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 22, 2005
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            You make a really good point here!!
            Thanks for sharing this, Tonya!! :D

            (Related link:
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/732)

            quallagirl <latonyabeatty76@y...> wrote:

            I know I am late replying but I just caught this.
            I have met some coloureds several years ago when I worked at Sears .
            I was basically showing them around the store .
            Anyway, there was this older lady I was
            talking to and asked her were she was from.
            She then told me that she was from South Africa.
            From the looks of her and her family,
            you could tell they were multi-racial.
            I think I may have asked her if they
            were coloured and she told me yes.
            After that, I asked her if I would be considered
            the same over in Africa and she told me yes.
            I didn't even tell her my racial background.
            It's interesting because over here, I am considered black.
            It does depend on were a person is from to be coonsidered
            something totally different in that society.

            Tonya

            multiracialbookclub <soaptalk@...> wrote:

            The "Coloureds" do not have one racial identity.
            They form a number of racially and culturally distinct
            groups and were legally considered a separate group
            under Apartheid's racial classification legislation

            In the 1950s and 1960s, laws ... attempted to
            make the "Coloureds" appear to be far more of one
            identifiable ethnic group than they are in reality.

            Indeed, many sub-classifications were required in the law to
            include all those that the government categorised Coloured.

            The Apartheid bureaucracy devised complex (and often arbitrary)
            criteria at the time that the Population Registration Act was
            implemented to determine who was Coloured.

            Minor officials would administer tests such as the
            pencil test (testing the curliness of hair) to determine if someone
            should be categorised Coloured or Black, or Coloured or White.

            ---Different members of the same family found
            themselves in different race groups ---


            Further test detemined membership of the
            various sub-racial groups of the "Coloureds".

            http://dirs.org/wiki-article-tab.cfm/coloured
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/101
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/93
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